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Archive for Sunday, July 7, 2002

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Firefighters being sent home as huge Arizona forest fire nears containment
July 7, 2002
(Web Posted Sunday at 2:10 p.m.) After weeks of battling the largest wildfire in Arizona history, firefighters from around the country were being reassigned to other states or sent home as the fire neared full containment Sunday.
Senators says U.S. needs to consider active role in providing security in Afghanistan
July 7, 2002
(Updated Sunday at 2:10 p.m.) The assassination of an Afghan leader threatens the fragile central government and should compel the United States to consider an active role in providing security in the country, lawmakers said Sunday.
Protestants fight Northern Ireland police preventing parade through Portadown
July 7, 2002
(Updated Sunday at 11:08 a.m.) Protestant hard-liners battled riot police Sunday after being barred from parading through the main Catholic section of Portadown, an annual confrontation that often triggers sectarian violence across Northern Ireland.
Israeli soldiers capture two armed Palestinians near Jewish settlement
July 7, 2002
(Web Posted Sunday at 8:19 a.m.) Prime Minister Ariel Sharon praised Israel’s efforts to fight terrorism Sunday, hours after Israeli forces captured two armed Palestinians approaching a Jewish settlement in the Gaza Strip.
People
July 7, 2002
Whistleblower cautions on July 4 about Americans’ loss of liberties Bowie knifes British media Director works past stereotype of emotionless American Indians Ad-lib turns into a life-saver
Arts Note
July 7, 2002
Steam show is part of Farm Heritage Days
Armstrong sheds burden of early lead in Tour’s first stage
July 7, 2002
In the long run, losing the Tour de France lead in Sunday’s first stage could help Lance Armstrong win a fourth straight title.
Outdoors Briefs
July 7, 2002
Cross, Simmons win Cheever-Frank team wins US-CATS title Carp shoot slated
Proceed with caution on PWCs
Personal watercraft fun, easy to ride, but boaters should be wary
July 7, 2002
Few things raise your heart rate like a personal watercraft. For the people who ride them, personal watercraft are exciting. For boaters who have to share the water with them, PWCs are perceived as a menace.
Fowl play is cheap fun
Birds in particular can put on wonderful wildlife shows
July 7, 2002
Johnnie Hudman is one of those outdoorsmen who appreciates the big picture. Hudman is wildlife manager for Stasney’s Cook Ranch in Shackelford County, Texas. He mostly concentrates on deer, turkeys, quail and doves, but he never passes up an opportunity to observe something interesting in the wild.
Sykora shipped to Anaheim
Mighty Ducks acquire four players
July 7, 2002
Petr Sykora, a 20-goal scorer the last four seasons, was among four players acquired by the Anaheim Mighty Ducks on Saturday night in a trade with the New Jersey Devils for defenseman Oleg Tverdovsky, forward Jeff Friesen and another player.
Armstrong nabs early Tour lead over Frenchman
Jalabert two seconds out of first
July 7, 2002
Lance Armstrong needed just over four miles to take the lead in the Tour de France. Armstrong started his bid for a fourth straight Tour title by winning Saturday’s 4.34-mile prologue and gaining the leader’s yellow jersey.
WNBA Roundup: Sting socks Rockers
Charlotte’s Feaster scores career-best 24 points
July 7, 2002
Allison Feaster scored a career-high 24 points and made a team-record six 3-pointers as the Charlotte Sting beat the Cleveland Rockers 78-67 on Saturday night. Feaster’s fifth 3-pointer with 9:32 tied it at 57, and her record-breaking shot gave the Sting (9-7) the lead for good with 7:22 left.
British Grand Prix: Montoya wins fourth consecutive pole
July 7, 2002
Juan Pablo Montoya will be on the pole for the fourth consecutive race today. The BMW Williams’ driver clocked a time of 1 minute, 18.998 seconds on his final lap of qualifying for the British Grand Prix on Saturday. It was the fifth pole of the season and eighth of Montoya’s career.
Gamble costs Earnhardt second place
July 7, 2002
It’s a situation Dale Earnhardt Jr. didn’t want to be in and a decision he didn’t want to make. What was more important: An individual victory or being a team player to help the family business?
IRL announces expanded, international schedule
July 7, 2002
The Indy Racing League’s eighth season will be the circuit’s longest, with 16 events from early March through mid-October on the 2003 schedule. The schedule includes the IRL’s first international race, set for April 13 the third race of the season at Twin Ring Motegi, Honda’s track north of Tokyo
Notebook: Kournikova loses twice in doubles matches
July 7, 2002
Anna Kournikova was a double loser Saturday. Nearly two weeks after being eliminated in the opening round of singles, Kournikova and Chanda Rubin lost their semifinal doubles match 6-7 (3), 6-0, 6-3 to Serena and Venus Williams on Centre Court.
Men’s Final: Nalbandian, Hewitt to take center stage
Wimbledon rookie will meet No. 1-ranked player for championship
July 7, 2002
David Nalbandian’s first appearance on Centre Court at the All England Club will be for the Wimbledon final against No. 1-ranked Lleyton Hewitt. It’s one of many firsts for the 20-year-old Argentine.
Notebook: Ex-champ says Dunes ‘fantastic’
Davies calls course her favorite for Open
July 7, 2002
Maybe it was because of the 68 she shot Saturday. Or maybe it’s because it reminds her of the links-style courses back home in England.
McGill ‘excited’
Golfer in final group for first time
July 7, 2002
By David Mitchell Jill McGill has never played in a final pairing during a final round of an LPGA tournament. She’s also never won on tour. Today the 30-year-old American could do both.
Marlins’ Floyd expects trade
July 7, 2002
Florida outfielder Cliff Floyd expects to be traded by the All-Star break, but the Marlins haven’t given him any indication when or if it will happen.
Strike, streroids casting shadows on All-Star game
July 7, 2002
As baseball prepares for what might be its last big event for a long time, a possible strike and steroid use among stars cast dark shadows over Tuesday’s All-Star game. The union’s executive board gathers Monday at a hotel near Chicago.
No funeral planned for Williams
July 7, 2002
No funeral services are planned for Ted Williams, his attorney said Saturday, as a dispute arose over the plans for the remains of the baseball great. Williams died Friday in a hospital near his home in west-central Florida. He was 83.
National League Roundup: Dodgers deck Cards in 11 innings
Los Angeles takes 4-2 victory in battle of division leaders
July 7, 2002
Eric Gagne slammed the door on the St. Louis Cardinals after Jason Isringhausen let another one get away. Isringhausen blew his third save in six games Saturday, opening the door for the Los Angeles Dodgers’ 4-2, 11-inning victory in a battle of division leaders.
Wizards settle for 1-all tie with Burn
July 7, 2002
Matt McKeon scored his first goal of the season to lift the Kansas City Wizards into a 1-1 tie against the Dallas Burn on Saturday night. The Wizards (5-5-6) scored first in the 52nd minute when Dallas goalkeeper D.J. Countess deflected a shot directly into the path of McKeon, who scored.
Youth Baseball Roundup: Raiders third in tourney; Renegades split
July 7, 2002
Enid, Okla., edged Lawrence’s Raiders 4-1, on Saturday in the semifinals of the Enid Woodbat Tournament, an 18-and-under American Legion tournament. Blake Dickson had a two-hitter entering the seventh. He allowed two earned runs on three hits.
Ex-Jayhawk Thomas to play with Pacers
July 7, 2002
Former Kansas University guard Billy Thomas will play at the Indiana Pacers’ rookie league camp this week in Indianapolis with hopes of making the squad’s summer team roster.
Carefree Ostertag generous, too
Former high school coach, teammates not surprised ‘Big O’ donated kidney to sister
July 7, 2002
Sam Lowe remembers the time the Duncanville basketball team lost its star 7-foot center. Not to an injury, but in a crowd in downtown Chicago. For two hours, Greg Ostertag was missing. How this happens is anybody’s guess.
Allenby leads Western Open
Lancaster second; 16 golfers within six strokes of top spot
July 7, 2002
The third round of the Western Open should have come with a warning label. Caution: Watching the leaderboard could cause motion sickness. After six players charged to the top and just as quickly slid back, Robert Allenby finally took charge Saturday. He eagled the par-5 15th and then followed it with a birdie, shooting a 7-under 65 to take a two-stroke lead.
Despite baserunning blunder in 10th, Royals slip past A’s, 4-3
July 7, 2002
Michael Tucker hit a 405-foot single. Tucker’s 10th inning homer turned into a base hit because of a base-running mistake, but it still gave the Kansas City Royals a 4-3 victory over the Oakland Athletics on Saturday.
Serena tops Venus in best sister showdown yet
July 7, 2002
At the trophy ceremony following the first one-family final at Wimbledon in 118 years, Venus Williams leaned over to sister Serena and whispered. “You have to curtsy,” Venus said. “Did you know that?”
Late pass propels Bliss to victory in truck race
July 7, 2002
By Andy Samuelson Mike Bliss’ story Saturday isn’t as spectacular as Sarava’s. The odds weren’t quite as stacked against Bliss, a NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series driver, as they were against the horse that ended War Emblem’s bid for the Triple Crown last month.
Rookie Scheckter snares pole for Ameristar Casino Indy 200
July 7, 2002
By Andy Samuelson There was no PlayStation practice by Tomas Scheckter on Saturday. But the young Indy Racing League driver’s owner and teammate, Eddie Cheever Jr., probably wishes he had a pause button.
Roy rested, ready to recruit
KU basketball coach tees up before taking off
July 7, 2002
By Gary Bedore Roy Williams had R&R on his mind last week. “I am going on a vacation before the summer recruiting period starts. I’m only going to play golf on any day that ends in a ‘y,”’ Williams, Kansas University’s basketball coach, quipped.
U.S. Women’s Open: Sorenstam in control
July 7, 2002
By David Mitchell Give Annika Sorenstam a final-round lead, and a tournament is usually as good as over. This time around, however, one of the women chasing Sorenstam has a long history of coming from behind.
Author Edna Ferber graces new stamp
July 7, 2002
Novelist, short-story writer, playwright, and one of the most prolific authors of the 20th century, Edna Ferber is hailed on a new U.S. 83-cent stamp to be released this month.
Bull-running kicks off with a bang
July 7, 2002
Tens of thousands of cheering, champagne-soaked revelers packed the central streets and plaza of this northern city Saturday to kick off Spain’s most famous fiesta the bull-running festival.
Venezuelan peace mission begins
July 7, 2002
Former President Carter launched a Venezuela peace mission Saturday sanctioned by leftist President Hugo Chavez but met with skepticism by many of Chavez’s opponents.
Weather hampers probe into crash
July 7, 2002
Rain and muddy fields slowed efforts Saturday to gather the wreckage as investigators tried to piece together clues about the collision of two jetliners at 35,000 feet over the German-Swiss border.
Houdini stamp gets fitting unveiling
July 7, 2002
Harry Houdini would have been proud. A trick often performed by the master of escapes was repeated Friday outside the Houdini Historical Center for the hometown unveiling of the 37-cent Harry Houdini stamp.
President starts 56th birthday on golf course
July 7, 2002
In a baseball cap labeling him “The Boss,” President Bush greeted his 56th birthday on Saturday with a crack-of-dawn round of golf and a common gripe against aging.
Airport patrols to be beefed up
July 7, 2002
The new government agency responsible for airline security said Saturday it would place armed law enforcement officers uniformed and plainclothes at ticket counters and other public areas of airports.
Officials call for new AIDS alliance
July 7, 2002
As 15,000 scientists, health care workers and activists gathered here for the 14th International AIDS Conference, three of the most important organizations involved in the global AIDS epidemic called Saturday for a new alliance to bring AIDS medicines to the world’s poor on a massive scale.
Networks announce news show lineups
July 7, 2002
Guest lineup for the Sunday TV news shows.
Sun shines again on Apollo
Famed Harlem theater undergoing renovation, rebirth
July 7, 2002
Sammy Davis Jr. strolled out, stared at the audience and lost his voice. Smokey Robinson taught the Temptations the words to his latest song, “My Girl,” moments before they took the stage. And a family named Jackson appeared on Amateur Night and became superstars.
Assassins gun down vice president of Afghanistan
July 7, 2002
A pair of gunmen assassinated Afghan Vice President Haji Abdul Qadir in broad daylight Saturday as he drove away from his office in the capital a crime that clearly destabilized this nation’s fledgling democracy.
Kansas schools on ‘blacklist’
Federal law allowing student transfers to better institutions may affect many districts
July 7, 2002
By Dave Ranney More than 100 Kansas schools have been listed by the U.S. Department of Education as low-achieving, opening the door for students to transfer to better schools if their current school is on the list.
Lake event celebrates America
Tens of thousands of Kansans turn out for belated Independence Day bash
July 7, 2002
By Mindie Paget After watching skydivers plummet to the ground at Perry Lake’s Fourth of July festival Saturday, 5-year-old Cody Hoover’s pretty sure he wants to jump out of an airplane someday.
Gas explosion firm’s fault, suit claims
July 7, 2002
The Oklahoma company that owns Kansas Gas Service misled regulators about the safety of its storage fields outside Hutchinson, the family of a couple killed in a gas explosion claims in court documents.
Larned raises funds to reopen cinema
July 7, 2002
After this central Kansas town’s only movie theater closed two years ago, residents raised $90,000 to buy and renovate it. Then they pitched in to run the place. With a volunteer work force manning the ticket booth and concession stands, the State Theater began showing the summer blockbuster “Spider-Man” Friday night.
Fast-food chains scrutinized for ‘portion distortion’
July 7, 2002
The fast-food industry’s highly profitable practice of serving bigger portions has become a lightning rod for criticism by nutritionists and health advocacy groups who blame “portion distortion” for the bloating of America, a trend with unhealthy consequences.
Airport shooter was nearly deported in ‘96
July 7, 2002
The government had started deportation proceedings in 1996 against the Egyptian immigrant who gunned down two people at Los Angeles International Airport.
Chain of accidents leaves two injured
July 7, 2002
Two people were injured Saturday when one accident led to another about 1:40 p.m. on Kansas Highway 10 east of Lawrence.
John H. Shumaker
July 7, 2002
Donald Gene Gragg
July 7, 2002
On the record
July 7, 2002
Local briefs
July 7, 2002
Kansas Politics: Overland Park surgeon will challenge Moore Topeka An Overland Park surgeon has filed in the 3rd Congressional District, making him the first Republican to get on the ballot for a chance to challenge incumbent Democrat Dennis Moore. Jeff Colyer filed his paperwork Friday with the secretary of state’s office to guarantee himself a spot on the Aug. 6 primary ballot. The filing deadline is 5 p.m. Tuesday. Moore is the only Democrat among the state’s four congressmen. The winner of the GOP primary faces Moore in November. Another Republican, Adam Taff of Lenexa, an airline pilot, is attempting to file by petition. However, the signatures of registered voters he submitted have not been verified. The 3rd District includes Wyandotte, Johnson and the eastern portion of Douglas County, including much of Lawrence. _____________________________________________ Kansas University: Parking director to retire After a 25-year tenure as head of the Kansas University parking department, Donald L. Kearns will retire this month. Donna Hultine, assistant director of parking services, has been appointed interim director until a permanent replacement is named. Kearns will retire effective July 19. Kearns was named director of parking in 1977, capping a 15-year career with the Kansas Highway Patrol. Before his appointment, he was senior trooper for the Lawrence district. At that time, the parking department was a division of the KU Police Department, now the Public Safety Office. Shortly after his appointment, Kearns oversaw the department’s reorganization as Parking Services, a self-supporting, autonomous unit. During his tenure, Parking Services built the Allen Fieldhouse and Mississippi Street parking garages on campus and modernized the parking system. The KU campus contains more than 12,000 parking spaces. _____________________________________________ Gasoline Prices: Pump Patrol seeks best deal The Journal-World has found a gasoline price as low as $1.30 per gallon at the Presto station, 1802 W. 23rd St. If you find a lower price, call us at 832-7154. Be prepared to leave the name and address of the business and the price.
What are you reading?
July 7, 2002
Lawrence Humane Society responds to a number of heat-related calls
July 7, 2002
By Midge Grinstead In the last three weeks, Animal Control and Lawrence Humane Society have responded to numerous calls regarding heat-related incidences with companion animals. The humane society had as many as 14 calls in one day, resulting in the seizure of four animals.
Apple Valley Farm continues ‘Drunkard’ tradition, debuts musical
July 7, 2002
The Karen Hastings Players have kicked off its summer season at the Dale Easton Barn Theatre at Apple Valley Farm with another turn of its longtime running melodrama, “The Drunkard.”
Single tickets for Lied Center events to go on sale
July 7, 2002
Single tickets for the Lied Center Series events will go on sale Monday. The lineup includes:
Flawed process
July 7, 2002
Journal-World Editorial Barring another appeal, the 2002 redistricting process in Kansas is over. Now’s the time to look ahead to 2010. In all probability, a ruling on Wednesday by a panel of judges on the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals closed the book on the 2002 redistricting process in Kansas.
Introducing another financial gimmick: Life Diversification
July 7, 2002
I’ve always wanted to run a cult. I’d like to be showered with adoration and money. But these jobs don’t open up very often. Not a single cult headhunter has called. So I’ve decided to start one from scratch.
DQ bites into upscale market
July 7, 2002
On her 63rd birthday, the Queen is getting a facelift. She’ll be spending more of her time uptown, too. International Dairy Queen, which introduced Americans to “the cone with the curl on top” in 1940, is cautiously rolling out a new restaurant format with more food choices and warm, earth-toned dining rooms where customers can enjoy lingering.
Bear likely to continue prowl
Lawrence brokers expect stocks to improve in 2003
July 7, 2002
By Chad Lawhorn The bear got mighty heavy during the second three months of 2002. And the weight of a falling market, or what Wall Street calls a bear market, probably won’t lessen anytime soon.
Broadway’s best
Youthful cast brings renewed energy to songs, dances
July 7, 2002
By Jan Biles “Lullaby of Broadway,” a song and dance extravaganza being staged July 14 at the Lied Center, has the feel of a “Little Rascals” episode: A bunch of friends and colleagues get together and decide to put on a show.
Wine, food festival salutes Cottonwood
July 7, 2002
By Jan Biles Leann Johnson attended her first “Salute! A Festival of Wine and Food” event three years ago. And she was so impressed with the fund-raiser for Cottonwood Inc. that she sought out its organizers and volunteered to help.
Head for the bat cave!
Carlsbad Caverns offers breathtaking subterranean tours and bats, too
July 7, 2002
Rangers sit visitors on stone benches at the huge mouth of Carlsbad Caverns National Park and warn them: Don’t touch the formations. Stay on the trails. No gum or food in the cave. No running. No shouting.
Sense for seniors: Keep track of regular screenings, shots
July 7, 2002
I get confused about what medical screening tests I need and what Medicare will cover. Is this information all together in one place somewhere?
Breakthroughs offer relief from poor vision
July 7, 2002
To doctors’ amazement, experimental new medicines are rescuing people from the brink of blindness so they can read and drive and sometimes even regain perfect vision. These lucky few are the first beneficiaries of an entirely new category of drugs that many hope will revolutionize the care of common eye diseases.
Freedom: Who does it better than U.S.?
July 7, 2002
By George Gurley Landing in New York’s La Guardia Airport is a different experience from what it was a year ago. The great canyon of skyscrapers fails to excite giddy anticipation of the Big Apple.
United ants shouldn’t be trifled with
July 7, 2002
By Dave Barry Miami Herald Summer is a lazy, relaxed, carefree time of year, when our thoughts turn to the possibility that our flesh will be stripped from our bones by millions of razor-sharp mandibles. At least my thoughts do, ever since a gang of ants started a colony somewhere in my office, which is located in my home in South Florida. (In fact, for tax purposes, this office occupies 248 percent of my home’s square footage).
Dot.com mania gets back to reality
July 7, 2002
By Philip Terzian Providence Journal Having helped to promote the dot.com bubble during the past decade, the media seem to have embarked on a scorched-earth policy. It is not just that American business is, as they say, in a period of adjustment; business itself is now under siege.
Candidates skirt budget details
July 7, 2002
By Mike Shields They’re not saying because they probably don’t know. Nor do they have time or reason to figure out plausible cover stories. Especially if the press and public don’t hold their feet to the fire.
Williams earned title of ‘greatest hitter’
July 7, 2002
By George Will Washington Post Writers Group There is no joy in Red Sox nation, aka New England, or in any heart where baseball matters. When Ted Williams arrived in Boston at age 20 in 1939, a spindly 6-foot-4, the Splendid Splinter said, “All I want out of life is that when I walk down the street folks will say, ‘There goes the greatest hitter that ever lived.’”
Whad’ya know?
Radio host Michael Feldman bones up on Lawrence
July 7, 2002
By Jan Biles Ask radio quizmaster Michael Feldman “Whad’ya know about Lawrence?” and his responses reveal the answer: very little. “You have an electric chair there,” he says. Uh, no.
Rooms & Roots
HGTV show to spotlight Rockhill design in Baldwin
July 7, 2002
This week, “Home and Away” host Cathy Hamilton, right, visits a new and unique home in Baldwin, designed and built by Lawrence architect Dan Rockhill. The home will be featured on a winter episode of Home & Garden Television’s “Dream Builders.”
Printed Art and Social Radicalism” draws from museum’s collection
Print exhibit at Spencer Museum focuses on radical politics
July 7, 2002
By Michael Newman In describing the exhibit “Printed Art and Social Radicalism,” Kansas University’s Spencer Museum of Art senior curator Stephen Goddard observes “graphic arts can be efficiently and inexpensively distributed in large numbers and they therefore lend themselves to such political image making.”
Cancer patient awaiting transplant
July 7, 2002
By Mindie Paget Since the weather warmed up, Jamie Kelley has been riding his bike, playing disc golf and cooking his favorite meals. Nothing too extraordinary, except that this is the first time he’s been allowed to perform such seemingly harmless activities in months doctor’s orders.
Remap decision not a surprise
July 7, 2002
It wasn’t surprising when three federal judges moved quickly to uphold the state’s new congressional districts and declared that communities of interest could be split up. Legal precedents had suggested Atty. Gen. Carla Stovall’s challenge would fail.
Education fuels GOP schism
School funding a key issue in conservative vs. moderate contests
July 7, 2002
By Scott Rothschild The Republican Party war over public schools and taxes that raged during the recent legislative session has found a new battleground: the Aug. 6 primary. So-called moderate Republicans are trying to defeat conservative Republican incumbents in numerous state House races across Kansas.
Youth Baseball Roundup: Raiders third in tourney
July 7, 2002
Enid, Okla., edged Lawrence’s Raiders 4-1, on Saturday in the semifinals of the Enid Woodbat Tournament, an 18-and-under American Legion tournament. Blake Dickson had a two-hitter entering the seventh. He allowed two earned runs on three hits.
tradition, debuts musical
July 7, 2002
The Karen Hastings Players have kicked off its summer season at the Dale Easton Barn Theatre at Apple Valley Farm with another turn of its longtime running melodrama, “The Drunkard.”
Let water slowly seep into the soil
July 7, 2002
Here are some basic watering techniques:
Dancers use torsos, sign language to tell tales
July 7, 2002
By Kristin Callaway A Turkish folk tale, Iraqi music, Lebanese dance steps and American Sign Language will combine to create a unique night of Middle Eastern culture during “Cairo on the Kaw VIII Â Tell Me a Story.”
s hot temperatures
July 7, 2002
By Carol Boncella The combination of sun and heat takes a toll on gardens during the summer. The duo, especially when accompanied by dry winds or a vacation absence, strikes a deadly blow to plants.
Candidates skirt budget details
July 7, 2002
By Mike Shields They’re not saying because they probably don’t know. Nor do they have time or reason to figure out plausible cover stories. Especially if the press and public don’t hold their feet to the fire.
School funding a key issue in conservative vs. moderate contests
July 7, 2002
By Scott Rothschild The Republican Party war over public schools and taxes that raged during the recent legislative session has found a new battleground: the Aug. 6 primary. So-called moderate Republicans are trying to defeat conservative Republican incumbents in numerous state House races across Kansas.
Cancer patient awaiting transplant
July 7, 2002
By Mindie Paget Since the weather warmed up, Jamie Kelley has been riding his bike, playing disc golf and cooking his favorite meals. Nothing too extraordinary, except that this is the first time he’s been allowed to perform such seemingly harmless activities in months  doctor’s orders.
Federal law allowing student transfers to better institutions may affect many districts
July 7, 2002
By Dave Ranney More than 100 Kansas schools have been listed by the U.S. Department of Education as low-achieving, opening the door for students to transfer to better schools if their current school is on the list.
Bring back double-duty football
July 7, 2002
By Bill Mayer The National Football League would wretch in agony. Some support people  like assistant coaches in specialty categories  might be out of jobs. But college football wouldn’t collapse if the scholarship limit was set at 50 instead of 85 and the platoon system was minimized.
Rookie Scheckter snares pole for Ameristar Casino Indy 200
July 7, 2002
By Andy Samuelson There was no PlayStation practice by Tomas Scheckter on Saturday. But the young Indy Racing League driver’s owner and teammate, Eddie Cheever Jr., probably wishes he had a pause button.
Flawed process
July 7, 2002
Journal-World Editorial Barring another appeal, the 2002 redistricting process in Kansas is over. Now’s the time to look ahead to 2010. In all probability, a ruling on Wednesday by a panel of judges on the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals closed the book on the 2002 redistricting process in Kansas.
Lawrence brokers expect stocks to improve in 2003
July 7, 2002
By Chad Lawhorn The bear got mighty heavy during the second three months of 2002. And the weight of a falling market, or what Wall Street calls a bear market, probably won’t lessen anytime soon.
Radio host Michael Feldman bones up on Lawrence
July 7, 2002
By Jan Biles Ask radio quizmaster Michael Feldman “Whad’ya know about Lawrence?” and his responses reveal the answer: very little. “You have an electric chair there,” he says. Uh, no.
Arts Notes
July 7, 2002
Photo Alliance to meet at arts center Oskaloosa quilters to have show Shape note singers to gather at museum
Arts Notes
July 7, 2002
Spencer exhibit explores art and social radicalism Journal-World is looking for most eligible bachelor
Arts Note
July 7, 2002
KU student portrays Amelia Earhart
Briefly
July 7, 2002
Jerusalem: Officers challenge Arafat’s security pick Greece: Raid uncovers more of terrorists’ cache Malaysia: Baby-smuggling racket broken up by police India: Flooding situation ‘grim’ for 700,000 Philippines: U.S. Navy Seabees end support mission
Briefly
July 7, 2002
Washington: Federal funds approved for stem cell research project Kuwait: Iraq agrees to return looted national archives New York: King of Pop accuses Sony of racism, exploitation Iraq: Farrakhan visits Baghdad
Freedom: Who does it better than U.S.?
July 7, 2002
By George Gurley Landing in New York’s La Guardia Airport is a different experience from what it was a year ago. The great canyon of skyscrapers fails to excite giddy anticipation of the Big Apple.
Youthful cast brings renewed energy to songs, dances
July 7, 2002
By Jan Biles “Lullaby of Broadway,” a song and dance extravaganza being staged July 14 at the Lied Center, has the feel of a “Little Rascals” episode: A bunch of friends and colleagues get together and decide to put on a show.
Etiquette an issue as trails grow
July 7, 2002
Two weeks ago in the Nemadji State Forest near Moose Lake, Minn., an all-terrain-vehicle rider confronted some horseback riders. “Get off our trail,” he told them, even though the trail is open to both uses.
Report skewers Enron’s board
July 7, 2002
The members of Enron Corp.’s board of directors contributed to the firm’s collapse by failing to curb the Houston energy trader’s risky accounting tactics, approving conflicts of interest, and rubber-stamping enormous cash payouts to executives, according to a harshly worded Senate report to be released today.
Florida city is nation’s launching pad for divorces
Cape Canaveral has country’s largest percentage of divorced adults, census report says
July 7, 2002
To the untrained eye, this sleepy seaside town seems so ordinary. The kind of place where spunky retirees pedal their beach cruisers down avenues named for obscure presidents and where children swat tennis balls at day camp, serenaded by afternoon cicadas.
Air tragedy fills parents with grief for lost son
Decision to let teen go on trip haunts mother, father
July 7, 2002
Fifteen-year-old Arsen Masagutov headed off to Spain eager to hunt for amphibians he had not encountered in the creeks and ponds around his central Russian home. Now his mother weeps ceaselessly.
Rain continues to pound Texas
Floodwaters surround homes in 29 counties in Lone Star State
July 7, 2002
Hundreds of people fled three small West Texas towns Saturday as a storm dumped more than a foot of rain on an area that rarely sees more than 2 feet a year, while rainfall tapered off in flood-weary central Texas, where water surrounded homes in 29 counties.
Lawrence commuter report
July 7, 2002
The following events and construction projects may affect commuter traffic this week in the region.
Gunsmoke’ star revels in show
Arness details his TV heyday in new autobiography
July 7, 2002
Some actors cringe at the thought of looking at performances they gave years ago. Not James Arness. The longtime Marshal Matt Dillon of Dodge City watches TV reruns of “Gunsmoke” every day.
Dogs, cats need air, water, shade
July 7, 2002
We’re in the midst of it the hottest, muggiest weather of the year. As we take care of ourselves by staying in our air-conditioned homes, we must not forget that our pets need us to also provide for their needs.
Hollywood’s in a family way with child-friendly films
July 7, 2002
The family that pays together has really caught Hollywood’s eye. It’s prime time for the family film, with studios putting more resources into wholesome fare, recognizing the value of movies that can take in four or five admissions at once when parents turn out with the entire brood.
Letters, numbers help identify dolls
July 7, 2002
Antique dolls are popular collectibles. It is often difficult to determine the age or maker of a doll, but there are clues that can help. Many dolls with bisque or china heads are marked. Look under the wig at the back of the neck.
Dancers use torsos, sign language to tell tales
July 7, 2002
By Kristin Callaway A Turkish folk tale, Iraqi music, Lebanese dance steps and American Sign Language will combine to create a unique night of Middle Eastern culture during “Cairo on the Kaw VIII Tell Me a Story.”
Tales from the prairie
Stories of settlers drive KU professor’s plays
July 7, 2002
By Jan Biles Marianne Kubik didn’t know much about the prairie before signing on to direct and choreograph “Prairie Fire,” a pair of new plays for Kansas Summer Theatre. The plays, written by KU theater professor John Gronbeck-Tedesco, are based on reminiscences and oral histories about early Kansas history.
With a snip and a spray
Basic care keeps plants thriving in July’s hot temperatures
July 7, 2002
By Carol Boncella The combination of sun and heat takes a toll on gardens during the summer. The duo, especially when accompanied by dry winds or a vacation absence, strikes a deadly blow to plants.
Caregivers can save cash
July 7, 2002
Beleaguered caregivers may benefit from a new discount service for medical products that may not be covered by insurance or Medicare but they may want to do the math first. The Caregivers Marketplace (TCM) offers discounts of 5 to 15 percent on items including adult diapers and nutritional supplements.
Briefs
July 7, 2002
Faces and places Honors and awards Coming events
Marriages of convenience’ could land partners in big house
July 7, 2002
Late pass propels Bliss to victory in truck race
July 7, 2002
By Andy Samuelson Mike Bliss’ story Saturday isn’t as spectacular as Sarava’s. The odds weren’t quite as stacked against Bliss, a NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series driver, as they were against the horse that ended War Emblem’s bid for the Triple Crown last month.
Briefly
July 7, 2002
Missouri: Pistol-brandishing bride shoots attacker Florida: Stolen chemical truck focus of national alert Houston: NAACP to open annual convention Los Angeles: Probe continues into small-plane crash
Hewitt wins in straight sets; Williams sisters take doubles crown
July 7, 2002
In a tournament where aging former champions Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi lost in the second round, Lleyton Hewitt swept through without a hitch and put on a ruthless performance Sunday to win 6-1, 6-3, 6-2 in less than two hours.
CART Toronto Molson-Indy: Da Matta holds off Tracy for pole
July 7, 2002
Cristiano da Matta rose to the challenge again Saturday, winning a shootout with Paul Tracy to wrap up the pole for the Toronto Molson-Indy. Da Matta began the day on the provisional pole for Sunday’s race, but had a real fight on his hands before the final one-hour qualifying session was completed.
Pepsi 400: Waltrip able to enjoy win
Only other career victory overshadowed by Earnhardt’s death
July 7, 2002
Michael Waltrip won. Dale Earnhardt Jr., went for broke. And the Intimidator would have loved the whole show. At the track the late Dale Earnhardt treasured the most, it was his good friend, Waltrip, holding off a late challenge from his son, Earnhardt Jr., to win the Pepsi 400 on Saturday night.
Nebraska flash flood kills trucker on I-80
July 7, 2002
A truck caught in flash flooding in drought-stricken western Nebraska plunged off the eastbound approach to a bridge on Interstate 80 and the driver was killed.
State briefs
July 7, 2002
Law enforcement group endorses Shallenburger Riley wins endorsement of committee members Finney to wage battle against credit-card debt Voter registration forms now in Spanish
Archbishop: Church tough on priests
July 7, 2002
The Catholic Church’s new policy for dealing with priests accused of sexual abuse is tougher than most state abuse laws, the head of the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas said.
City sales tax revenues slipping
July 7, 2002
By Joel Mathis City sales tax collections, stagnant during the past year, have begun to slide in recent months, officials said last week. “It’s not the ‘90s anymore,” City Manager Mike Wildgen told the Lawrence City Commission. “The ‘90s were growth.”
Review: Wambaugh explores case of firefighter turned serial arsonist
July 7, 2002
Joseph Wambaugh, a former detective with the Los Angeles Police Department, is best-known for the gritty police tales he created in “The New Centurions,” “Blue Knight,” “The Onion Field” and “Choirboys.”
Let water slowly seep into the soil
July 7, 2002
Here are some basic watering techniques:
Briefly
July 7, 2002
Florida: Brothers’ drownings are ruled accidental Los Angeles: Former bishop sued by one-time altar boy Florida: Bogus phone calls tie up 911 service Tennessee: Black farmers end sit-in at USDA office
Scandals prompt demand for reform
July 7, 2002
President Bush and Senate Democrats are both toying with a dramatic lay-down-the-law response to the growing pile-up of corporate accounting scandals. They want to jail executives who knowingly report phony performance numbers for their companies.
American League Roundup: Martinez logs 11th win
Red Sox ace headed home for All-Star break
July 7, 2002
Pedro Martinez is headed in the right direction again back to his Dominican Republic home for a rest after winning his fourth straight start.
U.S. reverts to ‘war in the shadows’
Special Forces, CIA operatives to carry out missions, taking over for infantry
July 7, 2002
U.S. officials have concluded after 10 months of war that the combat mission of U.S. conventional military troops in Afghanistan is largely over and that whatever fighting remains is likely to be carried out by small numbers of Special Forces troops and CIA operatives.
Director of ‘Birdman of Alcatraz,’ ‘Manchurian Candidate’ dies at 72
July 7, 2002
John Frankenheimer, director of such Hollywood classics as “The Manchurian Candidate” and “Birdman of Alcatraz,” died Saturday. He was 72.
Chinese student remembered
July 7, 2002
By Michelle Burhenn Though his time in Lawrence was short, Xun Sun’s impact was long-lasting, an official at Lawrence Chinese Church said. “We know he had only been here for 10 months. Most of us only knew him for those 10 months,” said Joel Li, pastor at the church.
Business Briefcase
July 7, 2002
Wal-Mart marks milestone Survey: Poll finds investors wary of chief executives’ motives Motley Fool: Name that company Summer: Workers make time for fun
s Open: Sorenstam in control
July 7, 2002
By David Mitchell Give Annika Sorenstam a final-round lead, and a tournament is usually as good as over. This time around, however, one of the women chasing Sorenstam has a long history of coming from behind.
KU basketball coach tees up before taking off
July 7, 2002
By Gary Bedore Roy Williams had R&R on his mind last week. “I am going on a vacation before the summer recruiting period starts. I’m only going to play golf on any day that ends in a ‘y,”’ Williams, Kansas University’s basketball coach, quipped.
Horoscopes
July 7, 2002
Bookstore
July 7, 2002
Arts Notes
July 7, 2002
Lied Center names new board members KC-area water gardens listed on tour Fiction writer to offer family story workshop
Bring back double-duty football
July 7, 2002
By Bill Mayer The National Football League would wretch in agony. Some support people like assistant coaches in specialty categories might be out of jobs. But college football wouldn’t collapse if the scholarship limit was set at 50 instead of 85 and the platoon system was minimized.