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Videos for October 29, 2011

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KU coach Turner Gill opening statement after 43-0 loss to Texas

KU coach Turner Gill makes an opening statement following his team's 43-0 loss to Texas on Oct. 29, 2011.

Published on October 29, 2011

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Field Leadership Exercise

KU Air Force ROTC student took to West Campus to refine their skills they've learned as they set up some scenarios ranging from a downed pilot to extracting POWs from prison and dealing with locals in a combat zone.

Published on October 29, 2011

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Eyewitness Identification

Lawrence Wrightsman, a KU psychology professor, talks about the problems with eyewitness misidentification, particularly in cases where a victim and an offender are of different races. Wrightsman submitted a report to the court in at Jones' 1986 trial, highlighting the issue.

Published on October 29, 2011

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Exoneration

With lawyers who always believed in his innocence, Joe Jones in 1992 was able to secure DNA testing to prove he didn't commit the rape. Jones was the first Kansan, and only the seventh in the country, to be exonerated by DNA evidence. Jones' attorneys said the crime didn't fit their client, who was gay and had no criminal history.

Published on October 29, 2011

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'They got away with it'

Seasoned investigator Jim Kenney worked for Jones' original defense team. Kenney, who always believed in Jones' innocence, began focusing his investigative efforts on showing that another man, Joel Russell, possibly committed the crimes. At the time, Kenney said Jones and Russell looked very similar. However, it's not clear if there were any efforts by police or prosecutors to investigate Russell following Jones' exoneration. The DNA in the case, though, is still in storage at the original testing lab, and could possibly be tested now.

Published on October 29, 2011

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On the outside

After leaving prison in 1992, the state of Kansas awarded Jones a $350,000 payment following his exoneration. The money added up to about $6 for every hour Jones was behind bars. On the outside, however, Jones struggled and eventually became addicted to cocaine.

Published on October 29, 2011

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DONOTUSE'They got away'

Seasoned investigator Jim Kenney worked for Jones' original defense team. Kenney, who always believed in Jones' innocence, began focusing his investigative efforts on showing that another man, Joel Russell, possibly committed the crimes. At the time, Kenney said Jones and Russell looked very similar. However, it's not clear if there were any efforts by police or prosecutors to investigate Russell following Jones' exoneration. The DNA in the case, though, is still in storage at the original testing lab, and could possibly be tested now.

Published on October 29, 2011

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DONOT USEOn the Outisde

After leaving prison in 1992, the state of Kansas awarded Jones a $350,000 payment following his exoneration. The money added up to about $6 for every day Jones was behind bars. On the outside, however, Jones struggled and eventually became addicted to cocaine.

Published on October 29, 2011

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DONOTUSEExoneration

With lawyers who always believed in his innocence, Joe Jones in 1992 was able to secure DNA testing to prove he didn't commit the rape. Jones was the first Kansan, and only the seventh in the country, to be exonerated by DNA evidence.

Published on October 29, 2011

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Wrong place, wrong time

Topeka man Joe Jones, talks about being spotted on Kansas Avenue in the early morning hours of Aug. 25, 1985, by a woman who was raped the night before. The woman identified Jones as the rapist, eventually sending him to prison on a life sentence.

Published on October 29, 2011