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Should United States leaders follow Britain and Germany’s lead and boycott the opening ceremonies of the Summer Olympics in Beijing?

Response Percent Votes
Yes.
 
64% 211
No.
 
29% 95
Don’t know.
 
6% 20
Total 326

Comments

newsreader 7 years, 2 months ago

Why on earth did the IOC give the ceremonies to China anyway? What did they expect with China's history?

canyon_wren 7 years, 2 months ago

It seems kind of hypocritical to boycott China when we are just slobbering all over them as far as trade is concerned. Usually, I think "Don't know" is somewhat of a stupid choice, as why would anyone bother to vote at all if he/she didn't have an opinion? However, I would have to choose that in this case. As a rule, I am inclined to respect Britain's perspective on things. So much of this is such a farce, that it is hard to take it seriously.

Haiku_Cuckoo 7 years, 2 months ago

No boycott. Why punish the athletes because of the stupid decisions of world leaders?Also, does anyone else find it ironic that those who are protesting for peaceful Tibet are using violent means to do so? They ambushed a torch bearer in Paris who was confined to a wheelchair and they attacked a bus in San Francisco that they thought had the torch in it.

Haiku_Cuckoo 7 years, 2 months ago

HAIKU we don't have much latitude to single out protesters after the U.S.A has used depleted uranium,white phosphorous bombs, torture, and sold chemical weapons to Saddam Hussein ?==========Gee, I guess you're right. That totally justifies attacking a person in a wheelchair. Up until two weeks ago, I mistakenly assumed that Buddhism was a peaceful religion. The violence on its behalf tells me and the world otherwise however.

ENGWOOD 7 years, 2 months ago

No boycott. Why punish the athletes!It was in July 2001 -- on Friday the 13th -- that the International Olympic Committee awarded the 2008 Summer Games to China. Now were concerned!

erod0723 7 years, 2 months ago

Oh.... poor athletes... their plight completely surpasses the plight of the many millions of oppressed and depraved Chinese, Tibetan, Mongolian, and other ethnic people in China. We have a moral obligation to protest as forcefully against China. We need to make it the worst, most disrupted Global event in history.

Ralph Reed 7 years, 2 months ago

Granted the Olympic Games have always been politicized, even in ancient times, the athletes should not be punished. They're being used as pawns and it's inexcusable.These games have been scheduled in China for several years. We lost our chance to bitch in this manner.

jonas 7 years, 2 months ago

"I mistakenly assumed that Buddhism was a peaceful religion. The violence on its behalf tells me and the world otherwise however."There are none of those types of religion. There has never been one that people did not commit violence in its name. Except maybe pastafarian. To the best of my knowledge, that hasn't happened yet. But give it a few years.

jonas 7 years, 2 months ago

Funny that the British, of all people, should be amongst the ones spearheading the boycott, as the British have quite an impressive history of subjugating and piecing out Tibet (and China, for that matter) themselves. When are the British going to apologize for the Opium Wars?

smilboy99 7 years, 2 months ago

Olympics is one of few things can bring most (if not all) members of this small planet together. Why not give China a chance to show itself and let us see China in our own eyes before judging it based on what we hear? Don't you think boycotting the Beijing Olympics is an alternative way of continuing the cold war? You host a big part. Since we don't like you, we won't go and we will isolate you. What is the consequence of this isolation? Think hard and think about North Korea. Do you feel comfortable and safe if you have an isolated and desparate neighbor?China has big issues of itself. But let's face it: we all have our problems. We all want to see a free, open and democratic China. But boycott and isolation are definitely not the way to reach that goal. Be smart and figure out a better way to help China reach that goal. Chinese people love our lifestyle and democracy. Help them reach their dreams. After all, we are all one big family in this small planet.

smilboy99 7 years, 2 months ago

jonas (Anonymous) says: Funny that the British, of all people, should be amongst the ones spearheading the boycott, as the British have quite an impressive history of subjugating and piecing out Tibet (and China, for that matter) themselves. When are the British going to apologize for the Opium Wars?----------------------------------------------------Totally agree.

Franker 7 years, 2 months ago

Who watches the Olympics anyway?? Boycott it who cares like anyone will notice?

deskboy04 7 years, 2 months ago

Who cares? Does anyone really watch the opening ceremonies? Does anyone really watch the Olympics? The television coverage is horrible. How many human interest stories can a person be subjected to in a two week period?

Haiku_Cuckoo 7 years, 2 months ago

Didn't Tibet have slavery before China took over? Am I mistaken? Wasn't the Dalai Lama himself a slave holder?

jonas 7 years, 2 months ago

Haiku-Cuckoo: Yes, they were under a caste-system theocracy, I believe. Of course, we're really talking about sovereignty, not democracy.

Frederic Gutknecht IV 7 years, 2 months ago

The Olympics...Sport of kings...Sport of manipulation and subjugation...Gooooooooooooooooooooooooo team! Blood...Blood...Blood makes the grass grow!I do feel sorry for the injection of politics and patriarchy into sport but I don't imagine that it can be avery meaningful beyond the pushers, pomp and circumstance of political posturing.

RedwoodCoast 7 years, 2 months ago

jonas (Anonymous) says: "...Except maybe pastafarian. To the best of my knowledge, that hasn't happened yet. But give it a few years."-------------Are you talking about the almighty FSM? Or are you really talking about Rastafarianism? Because as far as I know, Rastafarianism based upon a framework that categorizes non-Rastafarians as "the Other." Peter Tosh was a particularly unstable Rastafarian. Anyway, there are good and bad things about all religions, in my opinion.As for China, they seem to me like a totalitarian nation run by a select few (in proportion to China's population) who dictate what people are allowed to know or do. Just go over there and tell people you're trying to push Falun Gong. You'll be talking to the men in suits faster than you can blink an eye.http://www.faluninfo.net/displayAnArticle.asp?ID=9510I don't mean to imply that the above site is correct in its intentions. I don't know all of the details, but I do know that Falun Dafa (Falun Gong) is based upon Buddhism.Finally, I'll just say that bennyoates (no matter the person's identity) read the cards correctly. Oh, yeah, and the British were pretty nasty on many occasions.

Uhlrick_Hetfield_III 7 years, 2 months ago

I predict we won't. Given the trade deficit and their assistance in pulling the banking industry out of the sub prime crisis, they pretty well own us.

Sean Livingstone 7 years, 2 months ago

If we support, then it's like saying Texas belongs to Mexico.

vinividivici 7 years, 2 months ago

Singling out the violent acts of these protestors as evidence that Buddism is not in fact a peaceful religion is absolutely absurd! Do you not think that there are a**holes in every religion who warp the "scriptures" to justify their actions and to push forward their own twisted agendas? Fred Phelps, anyone? `And Hitler? Devout Christians with an utterly maniacal agenda! Does their interpretation of the bible mean Christianity is a maniacal religion? Or some of the people that practice it?

jonas 7 years, 2 months ago

Redwood: No, I was actually talking about the FSM, in perhaps something of a lighthearted manner. I would not describe China as Totalitarian, either. I tend to view that sort of thing in something of a continuum, and the China of today, while certainly more repressive than what we here and in other places are going to experience, the people on the street have a good deal of personal freedom. I tend to describe it as living without our Bill of Rights. It's not something that you exercise every day, but when it comes down to it, the difference between having those rights and not having them is truly enormous.

Sean Livingstone 7 years, 2 months ago

jonas,Then, listen to this.http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=87774513If you listen to the whole thing (7 minutes), you will realize that CCP is doing something to protect workers' rights, however, it's the employers who are fighting against it.At one point, the guy (interviewed) who lost his limp (suspecting that his employer is behind that), told NPR that the workers should protest and they did. However, they prefer to tone down their protests as it will scare the foreign investors away. They have a choice now, to leave their jobs if they don't like as there are now way more opportunities than in the past.

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