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Archive for Saturday, February 7, 2009

Also from February 7

Audio clips
Births
Couples
Obituaries
On the street
Photo galleries
KU vs. OSU The day in photos, Feb. 7, 2009 Lawrence High School girls vs. Olathe East Lawrence High School boys vs. Olathe East Free State boys vs. Shawnee Mission South
Podcasts
Polls
Which of next week's games will be tougher for KU?

Poll results

Response Percent
KU at Missouri
 
86%
KU at Kansas State
 
13%
Total 783
Who was KU's first-half MVP against Oklahoma State?

Poll results

Response Percent
Cole Aldrich
 
59%
Mario Little
 
18%
Sherron Collins
 
11%
Brady Morningstar
 
9%
Other
 
1%
Total 61
Which point guard will score more points today?

Poll results

Response Percent
Sherron Collins
 
72%
Byron Eaton
 
27%
Total 37

Lead stories

12:00 a.m.
Cem Basoflas, left, has been accused of sodomizing and killing a dog. Basoflas made his first appearance in court Friday from the Douglas County Jail. KU student faces animal cruelty charge in dog’s death
10:05 a.m., February 6, 2009 Updated 4:55 p.m. in print edition on 4B
Lawrence police on Friday were continuing to investigate an animal cruelty case involving a dead dog and which may include other animals, Sgt. Bill Cory said.
6:00 a.m.
Dr. Dennis Sale, Jozia Lutackas and Rumpa Yeasin guide Carmela Huston through a cardiac stress test at The Leo Center. The center operates on about $450,000 per year. The funding comes from grants, about 20 Lawrence churches, individual supporters and patient fees. Center’s funding, donations shrinking as demand rises
February 7, 2009 in print edition on 1A
There’s a little-known nonprofit organization in Lawrence that has a unique perspective on the economy. It’s called The Leo Center, and it’s nestled inside the east end of the Riverfront Mall. The faith-based center has a medical clinic, food pantry and a pregnancy care center. It also offers counseling services.
10:00 a.m.
Tom Curley, CEO of The Associated Press, responds Friday to a journalism student’s question in the University Daily Kansan newsroom at Stauffer-Flint Hall on the Kansas University campus. Curley was awarded the William Allen White National Citation on Friday. AP leader: U.S. should expand access for journalists in wartime
February 7, 2009 in print edition on 1B
The president and CEO of The Associated Press called Friday for the government to increase access to journalists on the battlefield. “No government will give us our rights if we are not willing to stand up and fight for them,” said Tom Curley, who received the William Allen White National Citation at Kansas University on Friday.
2:30 p.m.
Kansas forward Mario Little pulls up for a jumper during warmups befire tipoff against Oklahoma State Saturday, Feb. 7, 2009 at Allen Fieldhouse. FINAL: Little’s 13 points help KU to 78-67 victory
1:26 p.m., February 7, 2009 Updated 6:31 p.m.
Cole Aldrich added 12 points and 18 rebounds as KU improved to 8-0 in conference play.
6:00 p.m.
From left, Jonathan Wiens Blum, Danny Spence, Chelsea Zhou and Jenn Hunt collaborate on dinner in the basement of the Ecumentical Christian Ministries building, 1204 Oread Ave., in this October 2008 photo. Six residents and a cat live in the basement of the ECM in a co-op living community called Koinonia. Church home: KU students live co-op style at Ecumenical Christian Ministries
February 7, 2009 in print edition on 1D
Well before MTV’s “The Real World” and even before the iconic Sunflower House cooperative, there was Koinonia. It’s the original test of what happens when strangers are picked to live together — warts, homework, undone chores and all.

All stories

KU student killed on Shawnee Mission Parkway
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B2
A suspected drunk driver struck and killed a 23-year-old Kansas University student early Saturday morning as the student was assisting a disabled car along Shawnee Mission Parkway.
KU women fall to Missouri, 74-60
February 7, 2009
Danielle McCray had 20 points and LaChelda Jacobs added 17, but Kansas University’s women’s basketball team suffered a 74-60 setback at Missouri on Saturday.
FINAL: Little’s 13 points help KU to 78-67 victory
01:26 p.m., February 7, 2009 Updated 06:31 p.m.
Cole Aldrich added 12 points and 18 rebounds as KU improved to 8-0 in conference play.
Census adds 25,000 to K.C.’s population
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B1
Kansas City has added more than 25,000 residents to its official population. The city announced Friday that it had successfully appealed to the U.S. Census Bureau to increase its population to nearly 476,000.City Manager Wayne Cauthen says the numbers are important because state and federal officials take population information into account when deciding how to allocate certain types of funding.
School support
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B7
To the editor: In times of economic difficulty, the easiest targets are always the public schools, the less well-off and the powerless. I feel compelled to respond to Ralph Gagnon’s letter of Feb. 4.First, I commend the Lawrence public schools for their strong fiscal responsibility during the tenure of Superintendent Weseman.
Biden will set U.S. tone in European trip
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A3
En route to a security conference in Germany, Vice President Joe Biden warned Friday that the United States faces daunting economic and security problems in Afghanistan and will need help from allies to deal with them.“We’ve got to make Afghanistan the world’s responsibility, not just the United States’ responsibility,” Biden told a House Democratic retreat before heading to Munich as the new administration’s first envoy to Europe.
One-horse town loses its horse
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B4
This one-horse town is now a no-horse town. An elderly horse that drew worldwide attention for his owner’s refusal to comply with an ordinance barring livestock inside city limits has been moved to a new pasture.The 32-year-old Morgan-quarter horse crossbreed named Peter Rabbit was taken in Thursday by Anderson Equine Services of Firth, Neb.
Around and about
February 7, 2009 in print edition on D3
Jacob Esau, Lawrence, was named to the dean’s list for the fall 2008 quarter at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, Ind., by earning at 3.3 grade-point average or higher. Esau, a computer engineering major, is the son of John Esau and Mary Dillon.
Old Home Town - 40 years ago
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B6
James Black filed for another term on the City Commission. He was a local builder. Meanwhile, Bob Gerard, manager of the Penny Ready Mix firm, announced his candidacy for the school board.
FDA: Peanut plant knowingly sold salmonella-laced food
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A3
A Georgia peanut plant knowingly shipped salmonella-laced products as far back as 2007, at times sending out tainted products after tests confirmed contamination, according to inspection records released Friday.
Deep shame
A recent investigation reveals the Pentagon’s horrible judgment regarding Humvees and their capabilities.
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B6
The headline in Wednesday’s USA Today is a shameful indictment: “Pentagon ignored Humvee warnings: ‘94 report: Combat vehicle a ‘deathtrap.’” We’re then told that U.S. Army and Marine Corps officials knew nearly a decade before the invasion of Iraq that the workhorse Humvee vehicle was a major hazard to troops even with armor added to protect it against roadside bombs.
Center’s funding, donations shrinking as demand rises
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A1
There’s a little-known nonprofit organization in Lawrence that has a unique perspective on the economy. It’s called The Leo Center, and it’s nestled inside the east end of the Riverfront Mall. The faith-based center has a medical clinic, food pantry and a pregnancy care center. It also offers counseling services.
KU swimmers shine
Jayhawks dominate ISU in odd meet
February 7, 2009 in print edition on C5
Kansas University took a huge lead over Iowa State in the first day of an unusual two-day meet at Robinson Natatorium.
City Commission agenda: Environmental preservation revisited
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B2
Type of environmental features that could require preservation include floodplains, wetlands, streams, woodland areas, individually significant trees of 12 inches in diameter or more, prominent geological features with rocky outcroppings, archaeological and historical sites, prairie remnants of 1 acre or larger and lands with steep slopes.
Gimzo propels Perry
February 7, 2009 in print edition on C7
Shane Gimzo scored 19 points to lift Perry-Lecompton past Tonganoxie, 49-45.
People in the news
February 7, 2009 in print edition on D7
• Gov. Iceman? Kilmer ponders political run• Simpson forgets lyrics, fights tears at show• Christian Bale says rant ’inexcusable’• Hudson plans ’surprise duet’ at Davis party• James says she mocked Beyonce for laughs
No leadership
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B7
To the editor: We have budget shortfalls at every political level. People have lost their life’s savings; they are out of work and are losing their homes. Meanwhile, our “law-givers” are playing political budget games. Lawrence has a million-dollar near-term problem. We propose to balance it on the backs of the most vulnerable.
Cessna cuts work week, warns of furloughs
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B5
Cessna Aircraft Co. said Friday that it plans to cut the work week of some production workers to just three or four days a week as part of its ongoing effort to reduce costs amid a slumping economy. The move by the nation’s largest manufacturer of general aviation aircraft comes a week after the Wichita-based company announced a total of 4,600 job cuts.
Journalist shows confidence in news industry’s future
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B3
In an interview Friday before accepting the William Allen White National Citation at Kansas University, the chief executive of The Associated Press expressed optimism about the future of the news industry. While the overall demand for news remains high, said Tom Curley, president and CEO of The AP, organizations will have to take advantage of new opportunities.
Haskell’s president, regents hash out differences at Washington meeting
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B1
Haskell Indian Nations University’s president, its the board of regents and federal officials found common ground this week. “It just reaffirmed what we always believe: We are a policymaking advisory board,” said George Tiger, regents vice chairman.
Eutin example
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B7
To the editor: I was embarrassed that you decided to print the remarks of Dave Spangler in the Feb. 3 On The Street column. Mr. Spangler answered the question “How should the city address the proposed budget cuts” by remarking that “They need to adopt (the policy) ‘If you don’t work, you don’t eat.’”
SM South stops Free State rally
February 7, 2009 in print edition on C3
Free State’s free fall has left the Firebirds at a loss for words. “It’s really frustrating to some so close,” senior guard Connor Monarez said after Free State High’s 13th straight basketball defeat on Friday night. “I can’t explain how frustrating it is.”
Stubblefield gets probation
February 7, 2009 in print edition on C2
A federal judge on Friday sentenced former NFL and Kansas University player Dana Stubblefield to two years’ probation for lying to investigators about his steroid use.
Intensity needed against Mizzou
February 7, 2009 in print edition on C3
Nicollette Smith remembers Kansas University’s last basketball trip to Missouri and hopes the memory serves as incentive.
Stem cell, cloning expert Yang dead at 49
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A3
Xiangzhong “Jerry” Yang, a stem cell scientist who successfully cloned the first farm animal in the United States, has died after a long battle with cancer. He was 49. Yang, director of the Center for Regenerative Biology at the University of Connecticut, died Thursday at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, school spokesman David Bauman said Friday.
Gary Bedore’s KU basketball notebook
February 7, 2009 in print edition on C4
Kansas University recruited Oklahoma State starters Obi Muonelo, a 6-foot-5 junior guard from Edmond, Okla., and James Anderson, a 6-6 sophomore guard from Junction City, Ark. “We’ve recruited the last couple years with a lot of uncertainty who’ll be back and who will not be back. My deal to him was, ‘Don’t make an early decision. Wait and see how it’ll play out,’’’ KU coach Bill Self said of Muonelo.
Portions, not fast food, to blame for obesity
February 7, 2009 in print edition on D8
With all the finger-pointing at fast food as a factor in America’s obesity epidemic, you’d think people would be fatter where the supply of restaurants is greater.
LHS wrestler reaches finals at Rose Hill
February 7, 2009 in print edition on C7
Reece Wright-Conklin made it to the championship match of the Rose Hill Invitational.
Dangerous curve
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B7
To the editor: This is regarding the 90-degree curve at Michigan and Riverridge. When is someone within the city going to properly warn drivers of the upcoming curve? Maybe when someone actually dies, or kids are playing in the backyard just behind the curve and they get injured.
Call center’s hours to be extended
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B1
The Kansas Department of Labor will expand its call center hours on Monday. The department is trying to meet the increasing demand of thousands of Kansans seeking unemployment benefits and emergency unemployment compensation. The department’s unemployment contact center will extend its hours from 7 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays.
Club news
February 7, 2009 in print edition on D3
University Bridge Club announce results of its Jan. 31 meetings. Hosts were Florence McNicoll, Alice Akin, Lois Liebert and Virginia Williams. Blue winners were Walt Hicks, first; Tom Waller, second; Lois Liebert, third; Marc Kuepker, fourth; and Florence McNicoll, fifth. Pink winners were Bebe Huxtable, first; Edna Galle, second; Janet Dunn, third; Cora Kuepker, fourth; and Carolyn Harden, fifth.
Athletes must make better choices
February 7, 2009 in print edition on C2
It was a rough weekend for role models. Michael Phelps, riding high during his historic Olympic performance, was apparently a different kind of high in a photograph that appeared in the English tabloid News of the World. Phelps issued a statement acknowledging it was him, misusing his heralded lung capacity by smoking from a marijuana pipe at a party.
Furloughs begin for California workers
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A3
California’s first-ever furloughs began Friday with more than 200,000 state workers expected to stay home without pay amid the state’s fiscal crisis. Among the offices forced to close Friday were the Department of Motor Vehicles and the Department of Consumer Affairs. The governor’s Office of Emergency Services also was dark as part of the cash-saving move ordered by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger.
Global forum not bullish on America
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B6
With its stellar cast of political and economic leaders, the World Economic Forum here provides an excellent barometer of the latest economic and political trends. But this year’s Davos was positively scary. Its overwhelming message was that the world is changing in ways more unnerving than most of us have grasped.
Man arrested, issued 50 traffic citations
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A2
Elvis has left the vehicle. A man was arrested on more than 50 traffic citations — all in one day. Police said Elvis Alonzo Barrett, 46, fled from police trying to stop him for a traffic violation Thursday morning. Police said he ran through red lights, crashed into another car and a fence. Police said they found crack cocaine and a crack pipe in his car.
Miller paces KU at track meet
February 7, 2009 in print edition on C7
KU’s Amanda Miller was third in the women’s 3,000 meters at the New Balance Collegiate Invitational.
Identity doubt saves twins in drug trial
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A2
Identical twin brothers escaped the death penalty in a Malaysian drug trafficking trial after the court ruled authorities could not prove which man committed the alleged crime, news reports said today. “I … can’t be sending the wrong person to the gallows,” the New Straits Times newspaper quoted the judge in the case as saying.
Face transplant patient leaves hospital
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A2
She can eat pizza. And hamburgers. She can smell perfume, drink coffee from a cup, and purse her lips as if to blow a kiss. Except that one lip is hers, and the other is from a dead woman. She is the nation’s first face transplant patient, and on Thursday night, she went home from a Cleveland hospital. “I’m happy about myself,” she told her doctors.
Faith Forum: How do you define a miracle?
February 7, 2009 in print edition on D1
An Internet dictionary definition of a miracle is “an event that appears inexplicable by the laws of nature and so is held to be supernatural in origin or an act of God.” I would guess that most of us operate with a very similar definition of “miracle.” Now an important second question is, what events do you think are “inexplicable by the laws of nature” and thus, by definition, a miracle?
Shooter at Kansas Speedway sentenced
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B2
A man has been sentenced to more than 48 years in prison for shooting a detective as she guarded a Kansas Speedway vault. Fredrick Douglas was sentenced Friday for attempted capital murder, aggravated robbery, aggravated burglary and attempted aggravated robbery.
Officials: Fire danger extreme in Australia
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A2
Crews battled to contain dozens of wildfires across southeastern Australia on Saturday as temperatures soared to record levels and officials warned conditions were perfect for a deadly inferno. At least 40 fires were blazing in New South Wales state, and more burned in Victoria and South Australia. Most were in parks and bush land away from residential areas.
‘Gifted’ story can be heavy-handed
February 7, 2009 in print edition on D7
Classical music soars as a very important brain surgeon (Cuba Gooding Jr.) rushes to diagnose a hopeless case. Stirring strings and angelic operatic voices commingle in beautiful contrast to the clinical austerity of hospital corridors. But there is no cure. We are watching a TV movie being suffocated under ceaseless waves of nobility, good taste and uplift.
On the record
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B2
A 44-year-old woman reported battery in the 900 block of Vermont Street. The incident occurred in the west alley at 7:20 p.m. Thursday night.
KC police investigate 2 double slayings
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B3
Kansas City police are investigating a second double slaying. The first set of victims — both men — were found around 3:30 a.m. Friday in the parking lot of a club called Gerry’s Silver Slipper. Police spokesman Darin Snapp says officers also caught a man who dropped a gun and ran when they arrived.
Russia allows transit of U.S. military supplies
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A2
Russia granted transit rights Friday to non-lethal U.S. military supplies headed to Afghanistan but only after apparently pressuring a former Soviet state to close an air base leased to the Americans. The signal from Moscow: Russia is willing to help on Afghanistan, but only on the Kremlin’s terms.
U.S. events raise debate over need for Black History Month
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A8
Should Black History Month itself fade into history? Many have long argued that African-American history should be incorporated into year-round education. Now, claims that Black History Month is outdated are gaining a new potency, as schools diversify their curricula and President Barack Obama’s election opens a new chapter in the nation’s racial journey.
KU softball 1-1 on opening day
February 7, 2009 in print edition on C7
Kansas University lost to UTEP, 3-1, but beat Arizona, 5-1.
Cowardly ‘no-snitch’ culture
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B7
In Los Angeles, there is a park named in honor of Griffith J. Griffith, whose claim to fame is that he made a fortune speculating in gold mining and gave the city a large tract of land. In Chicago, there is a park named in honor of Ulysses S. Grant, whose claim to fame is that he commanded Union forces in the Civil War and was the 18th president of the United States.
Old Home Town - 100 years ago
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B6
From the Lawrence Daily World for Feb. 7, 1909: “Many of those who came here for the huge and successful YMCA convention, which drew nearly 1,000, will be speakers at local churches this Sunday. Many fine speakers are being lined up.
Church home: KU students live co-op style at Ecumenical Christian Ministries
February 7, 2009 in print edition on D1
Well before MTV’s “The Real World” and even before the iconic Sunflower House cooperative, there was Koinonia. It’s the original test of what happens when strangers are picked to live together — warts, homework, undone chores and all.
Park still struggling as economy tanks
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B8
With three months before a planned reopening, owners of a Wichita-area amusement park are struggling to find an operator. An industry analyst says the tightening credit and a struggling economy makes it make it unlikely Wild West World at Park City will reopen at all. Gary Slade, publisher of Amusement Today, says the longer the gap before the theme park reopens, the harder it is going to be to get it going.
Milestone victory
Lions rally to give coach Mallory her 100th win
February 7, 2009 in print edition on C1
It’s possible that, 10 years from now, Lawrence High girls basketball coach Kristin Mallory will remember Friday’s 57-40 victory against Olathe East as one of the biggest milestones of her coaching career.
Scouting news
February 7, 2009 in print edition on D5
Troop 59 will be host to its annual chili feed today from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 2415 Clinton Parkway. Tickets are $5 and will be available at the door with all you can eat chili, hot dogs and baked potatoes. Home-baked cinnamon rolls also will be available.
Veritas boys, girls lose
February 7, 2009 in print edition on C3
Veritas Christian School’s boys basketball team fell to Waverly High, 63-41 on Friday night.
Cessna worker accused in eBay sales
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B8
An aircraft mechanic is charged with stealing parts from Cessna Aircraft in Wichita and selling them on eBay. The U.S. Attorney’s Office said Friday that 31-year-old Diego Alejandro Paz Teran of Wichita is charged with one count of selling stolen aircraft parts. If convicted, Teran faces a maximum 10 years in federal prison and a fine up to $250,000.
Justice Ginsburg plans quick return to court
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A3
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg plans to be back at work for the court’s next public session, less than three weeks after surgery for pancreatic cancer. Ginsburg intends to be in court when the justices hear arguments on Feb. 23, Supreme Court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg said Friday.
D.C. status as pseudo-state advances
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B6
One answer is: Six rows of stars — the top, third and fifth rows with nine, the second, fourth and sixth rows with eight. The question is: How might the nation reconfigure its flag to acknowledge a 51st state. Or “state.”
KU tennis suffers 7-0 setback
February 7, 2009 in print edition on C7
Kansas’ tennis team fell to Illinois, 7-0.
Kansas men’s golf 15th in Hawaii
12:00 a.m., February 7, 2009 Updated 12:36 p.m. in print edition on C7
Kansas University’s men’s golf team placed 15th at the Hawaii-Hilo Invitational.
Assistant not an OSU fan today
February 7, 2009 in print edition on C1
Kyle Keller — who helped recruit all five of Oklahoma State University’s basketball starters — roots for the Cowboys to win just about every game.
Phones, Facebook bridge information gap in ice storm
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A1
When an ice storm brought down telephone poles and power lines across much of Kentucky, one small-town mayor pulled out his iPhone and began tapping away, posting rapid-fire updates on Facebook to let his constituents know what was going on.
Consumer watchdog in Kansas questions KCP&L expenses
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B5
A Kansas consumer group wants regulators to reject making Kansas City Power & Light customers shoulder some of the utility’s recent expenses, such as tickets to Worlds of Fun and sporting events. KCP&L is seeking a 17.5 percent rate increase, but in a regulatory filing this week, the Citizens’ Utility Ratepayer Board, which represents Kansas customers on utility issues, criticized some expenses, including $200,000 for Worlds of Fun tickets.
To the cleaners
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B7
To the editor: Talk about student pricing! I just returned from Flagstaff Ariz. Yes, a “resort” community. Staffed laundromat washers were available for $1.75 in clean locations where everything worked as expected. I went to three local laundromats to get some clothes cleaned when I returned. The first two locations charged $4.25 per load!
Haley’s family tree impresses Chiefs
February 7, 2009 in print edition on C1
Whenever conversation at the Haley family dinner table turned to football, it was more than just talk. It was education. While Dick Haley was personnel director at Pittsburgh and helping craft the great Steelers dynasty of the 1970s, Todd Haley was absorbing skills and insights to which few youngsters could hope to be exposed.
Stimulus deal reached, weekend vote likely
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A1
With job losses soaring nationwide, Senate Democrats reached agreement with a small group of Republicans on Friday night on an economic stimulus measure at the heart of President Barack Obama’s plan for combatting the worst recession in decades.
Disgraced A-bomb scientist who shared secrets is freed
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A3
For five years, the Pakistani nuclear scientist lived under virtual house arrest for allegedly leaking atomic weapons secrets to Iran, North Korea and Libya. On Friday, he strolled across the patio of his villa, smiling and waving, and announced to reporters: “I have got my freedom.”
California Medical Board probes octuplets birth
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A2
The fertility doctor who helped a California woman have 14 children, including octuplets born last month, is now facing a state investigation on top of harsh criticism from medical ethicists. The Medical Board of California did not identify the doctor who helped Nadya Suleman, 33, of Whittier, become pregnant with the six boys and two girls born on Jan. 26. Suleman has six other children.
Job killer for the books: 600K jobs lost in January
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A2
It’s now a job killer for the history books. And this recession is a long way from over. The nation lost nearly 600,000 jobs last month, the worst showing in a third of a century, as a vicious cycle of cutbacks by consumers forced ever more layoffs by beleaguered employers. The unemployment rate catapulted to 7.6 percent, the highest in 16 years, and seemed headed for double digits.
AP leader: U.S. should expand access for journalists in wartime
Fourth estate’s importance increases with growth of government ‘influence operations,’ he says
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B1
The president and CEO of The Associated Press called Friday for the government to increase access to journalists on the battlefield. “No government will give us our rights if we are not willing to stand up and fight for them,” said Tom Curley, who received the William Allen White National Citation at Kansas University on Friday.
Horoscopes
February 7, 2009 in print edition on D7
You discover the power of focus this year. A new pattern in which the process from thought to accomplishment seems as one is easily created. If you are single, you could meet someone through your day-to-day life. If you are attached, a common hobby could consume the attention of both of you, drawing you much closer.
Lions’ Green has a bright future
February 7, 2009 in print edition on C1
Some smart college basketball coach will venture into the Jungle, Lawrence High’s old and charming basketball gymnasium, to watch the skinny guard with long arms and broad shoulders. Then that smart coach will close his eyes and picture what Dorian Green will look like five years from now.
Comparison of economic stimulus plans
February 7, 2009
A comparison of the $827 billion economic recovery plan drafted by Senate Democrats and moderate Republicans with a $820 billion version passed by the House. Additional debt costs would add about $350 billion or more over 10 years. Many provisions expire in two years.
Pump patrol
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B1
The Journal-World found gas prices as low as $1.77 at several locations.
Early childhood screenings offered
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B4
Lawrence Early Childhood Special Services will provide free developmental screenings for children from 3 to 5 years old. The screenings test walking, talking, hearing, seeing, thinking and play skills. The free tests will be offered Tuesday and Feb. 24, and March 10 and 24.
Obama weighing additional Iraq withdrawal options
February 7, 2009 in print edition on A7
The White House is considering at least two troop withdrawal options as it weighs a new Iraq strategy — one that would preserve President Barack Obama’s campaign pledge to get all combat brigades out within 16 months and a second that would stretch it to 23 months, two officials said Friday.
$10M Cosmosphere expansion planned
February 7, 2009 in print edition on B3
A worsening economy isn’t enough to deter Kansas Cosmosphere officials from planning to do more than $10 million in expansions at the Hutchinson space center. A centerpiece of the improvements is a new, 30,000-square-foot Space Science Education Facility that’s estimated to cost $8 million. It would be built across the street from the Cosmosphere at the site of a former flower shop, and an enclosed bridge would link the two buildings.
Baldwin City artist, 92, will be honored at annual chocolate auction
February 7, 2009 in print edition on D1
Tom Russell has been painting for 75 years. At 92, he can’t think of anything he would rather have done. “Oh, Lord, yes, I love it,” Russell says from his Baldwin City studio, where he was working on his latest painting. “I don’t know what else I would have done.”