Archive for Thursday, September 4, 2008

Also from September 4

Births
Blog entries
Chats
Obituaries
On the street
Photo galleries
Monarch watch LHS football practice Republican National Convention
Podcasts
Polls
In a cost savings move, Kansas University has stopped the tradition of sounding a steam whistle to announce the end of classes. Will you miss the whistle?

Poll results

Response Percent
Yes.
 
82%
No.
 
17%
Total 765
Videos

Lead stories

12:00 a.m.
Kansas University's Facilities Operations workers, from left, Jack
Bame, Floyd Grant and Bob Sieber affix the new steam whistle as
fellow worker George Cone watches. The whistle was installed Friday
on KU's power plant, where it signals the end of classes. The old
whistle cracked in January.
KU unplugs steam whistle to cut costs
September 3, 2008 in print edition on 1A
Don Steeples embraces tradition, understands the importance of getting to class on time, and respects the public’s communal reliance on familiar on-campus rituals.He also knows that tooting KU’s familiar steam whistle costs about $3,000 a year.So he’s pulled the plug.
6:00 a.m.
Cat Monroe, seventh- and ninth-grade social studies teacher at Central Junior High School, was honored Wednesday with the Lawrence public schools' Horizon Award. The award is given to one elementary and one secondary school educator each year. CJHS teacher touched by award
September 4, 2008 in print edition on 10B
Cat Monroe received kind of a wake-up call Wednesday morning. Monroe, a seventh- and ninth-grade social studies teacher at Central Junior High School, received the Lawrence Horizon Award, in front of an assembly of students. “I am stunned. It’s an awesome feeling. I’m totally stunned about it,” she said.
10:00 a.m.
A monarch butterfly feeds Aug. 28 at the Butterfly Garden at Foley Hall on the KU campus. There will be an open house at the garden from 8 a.m. until about 3 p.m. Saturday The butterfly effect: KU’s Monarch Watch brings nature’s wonders to community
September 4, 2008 in print edition on 1C
We are so fortunate here in Lawrence to have connections with Kansas University. While you can live much of your life here and not get involved with KU at all, that would a true shame. After all, life is about connections, and the university offers many opportunities that foster greatness, even in gardening.
11:00 a.m.
Online chat
KU Provost Richard Lariviere discusses upcoming issues facing the university
September 4, 2008
Kansas University Provost Richard Lariviere will discuss upcoming issues and events facing KU.
11:00 a.m.
Online chat
KU Provost Richard Lariviere discusses upcoming issues facing the university
September 4, 2008
Kansas University Provost Richard Lariviere will discuss upcoming issues and events facing KU.
3:30 p.m.
Hit and run suspects Ramona I. Morgan, left, and daughter Sabrina J. Morgan are escorted by Osage County Sheriff's officers from the Osage County Courthouse Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2007 following their first court appearance a day after a hit and run incident on US Highway 59 four miles south of Lawrence which left one KDOT worker, Tyrone T. Korte, 30, Seneca, and a contract worker Rolland "Ron" Griffith, 24, El Dorado, dead. Ramona I. Morgan was ordered held on a $2 million bond and Sabrina J. Morgan ordered held on a $1 million bond at the request of Osage County Attorney Brandon Jones. Daughter says mom feared she was being chased on day of double fatality on U.S. 59
September 4, 2008 in print edition on 3A
A woman accused of killing two highway workers and injuring a third didn’t stop until she was more than 25 miles away from the scene of the fatal accident, according to a Kansas Highway Patrol trooper. The trooper’s testimony came during the third day of trial for 49-year-old Ramona Morgan. Morgan is charged with two counts of second-degree murder and one count of aggravated battery in connection with the Sept. 11, 2007, accident in a construction zone on U.S. Highway 59.

All stories

Residents trickle back after Gustav
September 4, 2008 in print edition on A10
Thousands of people who fled Hurricane Gustav forced the city to reluctantly open its doors Wednesday, but nearly