Archive for Tuesday, September 7, 1999

Also from September 7

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GARDEN SPOT BREAKOUT
September 7, 1999
BAKE YOUR BEST The second annual Prairie Commons Bake-Off on Oct. 13 is open to anyone in the community 55 years or older. Contact Manager Bev Bolton, 843-1700, for more information.
VALUABLE LESSONS
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I have read with dismay the conditions surrounding the recent forced retirement of Stan Roth, who was one of my favorite teachers from my LHS years. I say this even though Stan gave me the only bad grade I ever received in my high school career — a severe downgrading one nine weeks for failing to finish a term project on time, and I richly deserved it. Learning to plan and finish projects on time proved very beneficial to me in my later Air Force career.
RICHARD D. MOORE
September 7, 1999
Services for Richard D. Moore, 57, Lawrence, will be at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Lied Center. He donated his body to Kansas University Medical Center. Mr. Moore died Friday, Sept. 3, 1999, at his home.
MANY OFFICES CLOSED TODAY FOR HOLIDAY
September 7, 1999
J-W Staff Reports You can swim today at the Lawrence Aquatic Center, but don’t expect to get your mail delivered.
CONSTRUCTION REPORT IS MIXED BAG
September 7, 1999
Future construction contracts jumped in July, though the pace is off of 1998’s, according to a new report.
SEPT 7—100 YEARS AGO
September 7, 1999
On Sept. 7, 1899, the Lawrence World editorialized “Every once in a while some notoriety crazed individual commences a crusade against something or other that is in the public eye. The Mother Hubbard has been a favorite object of attack and yet this article of feminine apparel has clung to the fair forms of the ladies despite all criticisms. It is cool, comfortable and accommodating and its mission is to make life easier. We put so much upon our women folks that the men should welcome anything that made them feel more agreeable to surroundings instead of condemning. However, the Mother Hubbard has read its title clear to the hearts of the fair sex and it has defied all attacks. The men have not even succeeded in having it belted down.”
SEPT 7-25 YEARS AGO
September 7, 1999
Officials here joined with others about the nation expressing concern about the rapidly spiraling cost for health care in America. The local Gold Cross Ambulance Service record again was in question before the city commission after complaints from patrons. Earlier, the service had been given a clean bill of health after a study at the county level.
SUNFLOWER CHANGES LOCAL SHOW LINEUP
September 7, 1999
Sunflower Cablevision is expanding its local programming. The company — owned by the World Co., which also owns the Journal-World — started “block” local programming Monday night, offering locally produced shows from 5:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. on channel 6.
DERCHER EARNS SPOT, HENLEY TO BE CUT
September 7, 1999
Dan Dercher, a rookie from Kansas University, beat the odds. Bypassed in the NFL draft last spring, Dercher has earned a spot on the San Francisco 49ers 53-man roster.
LATE TD TOSS SPARKS HINU PAST MANU
September 7, 1999
Haskell quarterback Brandon Watson hurled a 43-yard touchdown pass to wide receiver Patrick Guinn to cap Monday’s come-from-behind victory.
SCAVENGER HUNT ENDS IN INJURIES
September 7, 1999
Four participants in a motorcycle rally this weekend were injured in an accident Sunday afternoon. None were wearing helmets.
INFLUENCE
September 7, 1999
A three-day conference will explore the past, present and future of the 50-year-old NATO.
PAROLEE ACCUSED OF ATTACKING WIFE
September 7, 1999
A Linwood man on parole for less than a month is accused of stabbing his wife and beating her repeatedly with a baseball bat for an hour over the weekend, authorities said. William M. Cash, 32, was arrested Sunday afternoon on suspicion of aggravated battery, unlawful restraint, criminal threats, auto theft and a parole violation in connection with an early morning attack on the man’s wife, the Leavenworth County Sheriff’s Department said.
BLOTTER
September 7, 1999
Law enforcement report Injury accidents
LAW DEAN REMAINS
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I read with some amusement Erwin Seba’s article on the “vacant” deanships. I was particularly intrigued by his report that the deanship at KU law school had been vacant since 1998. As many of your readers know, I submitted my resignation from the deanship in September 1998 to be effective June 30, 1999. When the search for my successor failed last year, I agreed to stay on as dean until June 30, 2000. I do understand that once one leaves office, one should fade away, but I hadn’t realized that the process, in my case, had accelerated to such an extent. (By the way, if you need proof of my continuing existence, just check your editorial pages for my column which appears on alternate Wednesdays.)
DISAPPOINTED STUDENT
September 7, 1999
To the editor: My name is Brandon Elliott, currently a senior at Free State, and I had the great opportunity to have Mr. Roth as my biology teacher. I was shocked when I was about to greet him on the first day of school, and I found another teacher in his room. I asked what the deal was and the rumor was that he was fired or that he quit. I feel this is a great loss to Free State High.
CALL THEIR BLUFF
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Stan Roth is known to me only by reputation but, having heard him praised for four decades as one of the most outstanding teachers in the Lawrence schools, I was shocked to read that he had been barred from the classroom and pressured to resign by assigning him to a demeaning position. Apparently the stuffed suits that run our schools do not honor excellence in the classroom.
GOOD PREPARATION
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I, like many others, read the article describing the forced retirement of Stan Roth with dismay. I took Mr. Roth’s CP biology course ten years ago. Unlike many others that have written, I did not have a particular interest in science. However, despite this fact, Mr. Roth was one of my three favorite teachers at LHS. The other two (Paul Steuwe and Pat Nemchock) taught the two subjects I was most interested in, history and art.
NO DEFENSE NEEDED
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I often check the web site of the Journal-World. Of course, the recent headline regarding the end of Stan Roth’s teaching career caught my attention. The article contained much of what I would expect to read about the Stan Roth that I know and respect. It was the explanation of the events that led to his decision to retire earlier than he had planned that prompts me to write this letter.
CALLOUS DECISION
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I am writing in response to your article about Mr. Stan Roth, former biology teacher in the Lawrence school district.
HUNGRY CHILDREN
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Yesterday I heard a story that just made me cry. A principal at a Lawrence elementary school asked one of his pupils what he thought he was doing putting his leftover lunch in a sack. The child replied that he wouldn’t have any supper so he wanted to take the food home for later.
POOR TREATMENT
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I am deeply disturbed by your Aug. 30 article concerning Stan Roth’s dismissal as a biology teacher, apparently chiefly for his “controversial demeanor,” or direct, no-nonsense approach.
ENLIGHTENED TOWN?
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Recently I got an e-mail from a friend who works in computer technology commenting on the state Board of Education’s decision about the teaching of evolution and so-called “creation science.” He said, “I thought all classes had been suspended in Kansas for fear the students might be tainted with knowledge.” I’m afraid this is the way we look to the technological leaders who have a great influence on both intellectual and economic development. They agree with the overwhelming majority of the scientific community, who judge theories by scientific methods and evidence. On these grounds, evolution is so thoroughly accepted that there is no scientifically valid reason to “balance” it with some competing speculation.
TWIST ON ISSUE
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I am writing yet another letter in reference to the unfortunate release of Stan Roth as a biology teacher at Free State High School. My children have not taken a class under him, but I understand that Stan Roth was indeed an excellent teacher. I was saddened by the way the “system” shuffled him out the back door.
LOSS
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I am writing in defense of Mr. Stan Roth, perhaps Lawrence’s finest teacher. As a 1997 graduate of Lawrence High School and the product of Mr. Roth’s biology class, I was bitterly sad at the cause of his early retirement. Stan Roth greatly influenced my life in nothing but a positive manner. I am pursuing a degree in biology primarily because this man taught me to expect nothing less than my best. This is true for many, many other of his students.
VE HEARD OF A HEAQUARTERS IN TOWN. WHAT IS IT?
September 7, 1999
I’ve heard of a “headquarters” place in town. What is it? Headquarters Counseling Center is a local service that acts as a first call for help, providing counseling and information to assist with personal concerns. It provides free and confidential services 24 hours a day.
PARTY LITTER
September 7, 1999
To the editor: The recent news article about the ticketing of violators of misplaced yard sale signs makes me wonder why the city commission doesn’t put some teeth into their litter ordinance.
COURAGEOUS TEEN
September 7, 1999
To the editor: The Journal-World’s article on Monday, Aug. 30 about the Lawrence district high school biology “teacher” was a mistake. If it had to printed, it should have focused on the tremendous courage of a young teenage girl politely standing up for what is right in the face of a rude and bigoted elitist who claims to be a teacher. The J-W should have spent more time learning about the “teaching style” of the latter.
IMPRESSIVE RECORD
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I had Stan Roth as an advanced biology teacher almost 30 years ago. He was one of the best, if not the very best, teacher I experienced in my many years as a student. I measure that through the impact he had on my life, as well as his impact on my peers — many of whom went on to careers in science heavily influenced by the high standards and sense of scientific excitement he engendered.
PEOPLE CHANGE
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I read a lot of letters supporting poor Mr. Roth and I am very glad that years ago he made an impact on people in a possitive way at Lawrence High School. However, I dealt with Mr. Roth just last year at Free State High School where it seems Mr. Roth was not too happy.
WATER ISSUES
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Thanks for stepping up the Journal-World’s coverage of environmental issues in our Kansas River watershed. I especially appreciate Peter Hancock’s concise, aggressive reporting about clean water.
BAD IMPRESSION
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Let me begin by saying I know I’m in the minority when I state I’m elated to see Mr. Roth “retire.” I was fortunate to have only one of three children subjected to his so-called teaching methods. When a bright student makes average to above average grades on papers and tests, and ends up with an F on his report card, I view this as ludicrous. Roth’s explanation — he uses “subjective” means other than grades to determine a final grade! By subjective he means that he dislikes students who are quiet, who typically wear dark-colored clothes, and who won’t tolerate being called derrogatory names.
KANGAROO COURT
September 7, 1999
To the editor: We, as former students of Stan Roth, are outraged at the treatment he has received. To oust a teacher of his caliber is an abomination. We can only imagine the hurt and disappointment he felt when it was revealed to him that he was no longer wanted as a teacher in the Lawrence school system.
UNIFIED FRONT?
September 7, 1999
To the editor: The Lawrence school board had a retreat last Saturday to develop a team approach to publicly deliberating volatile issues. From what was reported from the team-building session, it appears more like the board is dividing into teams rather than building a team. Instead of having a retreat, the board might better spend its time attending the workshop on eliminating bullyism that was presented to the elementary schools.
WHO IS JOHN J. GUNTHER, NAMESAKE OF THE HUD AWARD?
September 7, 1999
I saw that Lawrence’s department of Housing and Neighborhood Development recently won an award — the John J. Gunther Blue Ribbon Best Practices Award — from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Who is John Gunther, the award’s namesake? The award is named for Gunther, “a legendary figure in the history of housing and community development,” said Gayle Martin, the city’s communications coordinator. “The longtime director of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, Gunther was instrumental in the 1970s in shaping key urban initiatives and in creating HUD and the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program.”
LORING DEWITT DALTON
September 7, 1999
Services for Loring DeWitt Dalton, 85, of Naples, Fla., will be at 2 p.m. Thursday at Lely Presbyterian Church, Naples. Burial of ashes will be in the Memorial Garden at the church Mr. Dalton died Sunday, Sept. 5, 1999, at Manor Care at Lely Palms, Naples.
ARISE AND THINK
September 7, 1999
To the editor: There appears to be trouble with people’s memory. Those who have written mocking Christianity over things like the flat earth forget that it was also the accepted scientific theory at that time. In fact, the church held those beliefs because it was the scientific belief at that time.
SIGN SILLINESS
September 7, 1999
To the editor: The article in reference to garage sale postings in Sunday’s paper was one that got many people’s attention. Many people have garage sales in Lawrence every weekend and post signs but do they get ticketed for such sales? Most likely not!!!
RESPECT FOR BELIEFS
September 7, 1999
To the editor: In the article regarding the retirement of the Free State biology teacher, it was unfortunate that the Journal-World attempted to make a political issue out of a personal one. The core of my difference with the teacher was never one of creation science versus evolution science. It was an issue of respect, respect of a person’s beliefs and opinions.
A STUDENT TEACHER
September 7, 1999
To the editor: In a time when biology education is under attack in Kansas, Lawrence has caused more embarrassment by “retiring” a great biology educator, Stan Roth.
ALWAYSSMILE
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I attended K-12 in Lawrence public scools. I had a lot of fine teachers through the years and some that I thought were not. I walked into sophomore biology class in the fall of 1985 and met one of the finest teachers in Lawrence public school history: Stan Roth.
SPEAKING OUT
September 7, 1999
To the editor: When Kansans look back on board of education decisions of 1999, which will be more embarrassing, the state board’s take on evolution, or the Lawrence school board’s take on one member attempting to stake out a dissenting position?
MISGUIDED ACTION
September 7, 1999
To the editor: What disillusionment! Along with our State Board of Education’s non-evolution stand, I’ve read on the front page of the J-W (8-22-99) that we are ALSO going back in time in the care our state provides our frail elderly, the most vulnerable of our citizens.
WHAT DID YOU LEARN
September 7, 1999
What did you learn? To the editor:
PUBLIC RELATIONS
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I would like to respond to Mr. Dwane Schaake’s question regarding the problem of the tar on 1200E Road.
TO THE COURTS
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Recently, the Kansas Board of Education decided to no longer require that evolution to be taught. The decision had little to do with “local control” and even less to do with real science. Rather, the decision was based on religion.
TRUST IN GOD
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I applaud the recent decision of the Kansas Board of Education. Why is it so difficult for a country that was founded on the belief of God to stand up for God? Why is it so difficult to put our trust and faith that this wonderful world in all its beauty, order and magnificent creation was not just a happening but planned in an orderly way that assures us a divine being is in control? We hear the phrase, “In God We Trust,” and so we must.
BAD DECISION
September 7, 1999
To the editor: The city commission’s action in closing the Brown Bear Brewery because the establishment failed to meet the 55 percent food sales requirement last month (only 50 percent of their sales were in food) shows an appalling lack of flexibility and common sense on the part of the commissioners. Surely some consideration could have been taken of the fact that business as a whole is down in the summer in Lawrence and has been further depressed downtown by the ongoing demolition of several major streets.
MCBRIDE AND FAMILY
September 7, 1999
School priority To the editor:
DOWNTOWN ASSET
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I was disappointed by the city commission’s decision not to renew the alcohol license of Brown Bear Brewing Company Tuesday. In the 11 months my wife and I have lived in Lawrence, the Brown Bear has been a favorite on our occasional nights out. It offered good microbrew beer at a reasonable price, excellent bands and a comfortable atmosphere, even for people older than college age (we are in our 30s).
DISCRIMINATION ISSUE
September 7, 1999
To the editor: With regard to the article “Hiring minority faculty,” and the response by D.R. Davis on 8-20 and the rest of America. It should disturb you that today we still need to discuss the problem of discrimination. I do not know what world D.R. Davis and everybody else in America live in, but discrimination is still a problem.
PROTECT PARK
September 7, 1999
To the editor: How would a resort on Clinton Lake affect life in Lawrence and Douglas County? Just who would benefit from a resort on Clinton Lake?
KANSAS NOT SO BAD
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Enough already! On July 28, the Lawrence Journal-World printed a survey by The Children’s Rights Council ranking the best states in which to raise a child.
MILITARY JOBS
September 7, 1999
To the editor: After reading the front page article 8-18 about how the political muscle keeps expensive and outmoded military depots alive, I had an uneasy feeling that a substantial portion of our defense budget goes to satisfy the job picture for certain congressmen’s constituency.
BIASED COVERAGE
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I am disappointed on how the media has overdone and biased the coverage on the board of education vote. After all, the result was to simply let the state school districts decide whether evolution, creationism or other theories ought to be presented to the students. If others across the country look down upon Kansas for this, I believe we can blame the media for hyping this as a win for “creationists” and creating the furor.
HUNGER AND TAXES
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Your recent article regarding hunger in Kansas mentions all of the possible causes except one very important one, which is the sales tax on groceries. In Douglas County there is a 6.9 percent sales tax on all groceries including infant formula and baby food. Only 12 states now tax groceries and two of them have a less than 1.25 percent tax. If you do the math, the elimination of this tax on one of life’s essentials would allow for a 6.9 percent immediate reduction of hunger in Kansas. There is a meager rebate on this tax available for poor folks but that rebate does not eliminate hunger when the money runs out before tax refund time. It is time Kansas liberals and all other Kansans who care about hungry people get with the times and eliminate this most oppressive grocery tax.
FLEXIBLE ZONING
September 7, 1999
To the editor: The city commision’s approval of the preliminary development plan for the Aberdeen South apartments as well as the zoning of the Antioch Baptist Church property in Iowa Street are two recent examples of problems associated with zoning ordinances that allow for development of properties in unpredictable ways.
TEACHING COUNTS
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Been reading about the injustices done to Mr. Stan Roth and subsequent letters in his defense. We have to add out two cents’ worth.
BAD TIMING
September 7, 1999
To the editor: ‘Xcuse me. Can someone ‘splain somethin’ to this ol’ country boy? Traffic across the Kansas River bridge has been seriously compromised for, what is it two months. Thursday all lanes of the bridge were reopened to traffic! ‘Course now it seems that someone has decided it’s time to repaint the pedesterian railings at the train underpass just north of the bridge. so, GUESS WHAT, now there’s a traffic bottleneck there. Couldn’t it have been scheduled while traffic was already a disaster during the bridge’s rebuilding?
READY FOR COLLEGE?
September 7, 1999
To the editor: The Kansas Board of Education’s ruling that, in primary and secondary public schools, no emphasis shall be given to biological and astronomical evolution and that these topics shall not be covered in the state’s assessment of students, raises important issues for the state’s public universities.
PRAISE DESERVED
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Chuck Wooling’s article about Lee Ice was long overdue. Lee is an excellent coach and baseball teacher and has been instrumental in holding the Lawrence Legion program together through some tough times. In addition, he has done it to benefit Lawrence baseball players, without personal financial gain.
CREATIONISM RULING
September 7, 1999
To the editor: The board of education passed a version of “science” standards recently that settled a long-debated issue: whether or not to allow local districts to teach evolutionary theory or the personal beliefs of Steve Abrams, Mary Douglass Brown, Scott Hill, John Bacon, Harold Voth and Linda Holloway. Voth’s swing vote opened the way for yet another version of “scientific” creationism to promote religious belief in the schools.
RESORT OPPOSED
September 7, 1999
To the editor: You don’t know what you’ve got ‘til it’s gone”
STAGGERING HYPOCRISY
September 7, 1999
To the editor: As a lifelong Kansan I am offended by the recent actions of our state board of education. In one stupefying vote, the board validated all those “yokel” stereotypes that bedevil our state.
LEGAL PRECEDENT
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Passage of the new Kansas science education standards has caused confusion among some school administrators and citizens. Nearly half of the citizens who testified at the recent board hearings believed that the standards required equal time for creationism in science classrooms, and some Kansas biology teachers have been told by their administrators that adoption of the altered standards will mean that they must adopt a textbook that includes creationism.
ROAD RANKLES
September 7, 1999
To the editor: As an employee of a business effected by Doug Compton’s closing of the frontage road on east 23rd Street, I’ve been following your coverage with more than average interest. The closure has, without question, made it extremely dangerous to cross over to any of the businesses on the frontage road, and let’s remember there are other businesses besides Don’s Steakhouse on that road.
DIFFERENT DAYS
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I would like to reply to Bill Kinnersley’s letter in the Aug. 14 Public Forum.
LACK OF EVOLUTION
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Those who puzzle about how the state board of education could vote in favor of a science education standard that discourages the teaching of evolution need only to understand that there are a number of humans on the planet who have been unaffected by evolution. Their minds have not grown and developed through the thousands of years of anthropological development but have remained static. The total number of these unfortunates on the planet is unknown, but there are at least six in Kansas, and they sit on our board of education. This is a fundamental element of civilization and one that all voters should take into account when scrutinizing candidates for any office.
OFF BASE
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Ben Habiger (“Population facts?” Public Forum, July 25) is miles off base when he refers to last year’s 78 million world population increase as “bold face propaganda,” then cites 10 European countries where population is declining. The 78 million figure comes from the United Nations Population Division and I have not seen it challenged by any reputable or responsible demographer.
LOSS TO LAWRENCE
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Thank you for the article on Mr. Roth’s early retirement.
NEXT?
September 7, 1999
To the editor: As a retired Presbyterian minister and as a person who has worked as a chemist in industry, I find the news from Kansas very disturbing.
ACTIVISM APPLAUDED
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Margaret Mead once said something like, “Never underestimate the power of one highly committed person to change the world.” I imagine she was thinking of changing the world in a positive way. However, we can all think of people who have had a singularly negative effect, as well.
S GOING ON?
September 7, 1999
To the editor, Friends and family from out of state have asked me what in the world is going on here in Kansas. I tell them I don’t know whether to laugh or cry. Thank you for running the Baltimore Sun article with excerpts from H. L. Mencken’s coverage of the Scopes trial. His words are as fitting today as they were in 1925. The letters and e-mails published Sunday were informed, articulate and to the point as well. There’s nothing further I can add about the fundamentalist majority on the State Board of Education. Besides, I’m not sure of the plural of “ignoramus.”
SPURRING REBELLION
September 7, 1999
To the editor: An open letter to the Kansas State Board of Education (Linda Holloway, John Bacon, Mary Douglass Brown, Steven Abrams, Harold Voth, and Scott Hill):
DARWINRELIGION
September 7, 1999
To the editor: The 6-4 vote of the Kansas Board of Education to delete any reference to evolution as an underlying principle of biology and other sciences shows what happens when a zealous dogmatic sectarian religious group gains political power. No longer will knowledge of evolution be required in state-sanctioned tests in Kansas although the subject may still be taught in the public schools.
POWER ISSUE
September 7, 1999
To the editor: This trend of bringing religion back into our schools that the conservative Christians are attempting is weighing on the American public. The idea of mending contemporary problems through the use of uniform Christian ideals is absurd, and alienates those of us who may be of another religious background or choose not to subscribe to religion at all.
TEACH IT ALL
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Perhaps Jack Davidson, Bill Graves and others should not be so “embarrassed” by the recent vote of the Kansas State Board of Education to de-emphasize the teaching of evolution. Perhaps we are just paving the way to bring back some scientific validity to the classroom. Perhaps in the pursuit of educational diversity, progress and intellectual integrity we should actually go a step further and ask that there be an official nationwide ruling mandating that evolution be taught in every school — as a religion. All evidence of origins is based on assumptions and presuppositions, and all assumptions and presuppositions are based on faith. Evolution as an attempt to define origins must be accepted on faith. Religious faith. Even blind faith!
SAFETY ISSUES
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Living in the country, I encounter bicyclists and farm vehicles frequently and I’d rather meet the farm vehicle. I’ve never seen tractors riding two, three or four abreast. They don’t run stop signs. They might have flashing yellow caution lights and almost always have a big red and orange “slow moving vehicle” sign on the back. When they notice a vehicle behind them most will pull over so that the car behind can pass safely. The person driving, if born after a certain year, has had special training before being able to get behind the wheel of that vehicle and possesses a permit to do so, unless they grew up on the farm. Not to mention that these people are using this vehicle to earn a living.
EQUAL TREATMENT
September 7, 1999
To the editor: This has been a hot issue of late in the letters to the editor. I have had the same problems as a driver with bicyclists since moving to the area. Not that the problem is exclusive to the area, but it seems worse here. Not blaming it on the arrogance of the riders, but many in town and on the roads do not observe safety or even road signs, such as yield signs or stop signs. This is what most drivers have the biggest problem with, not obeying the signs or safety regulations!
BOARD COMMENDED
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Personally, we commend the Kansas State of Board of Education for its decision to de-emphasize the teaching of macro-evolution in our schools despite the fierce personal attacks of some in the scientific community and the hyped coverage of the issue in the media.
COEXISTENCE URGED
September 7, 1999
To the editor: This letter is in response to Mr. Walker and Ms. Holland. As a taxpayer, motorist, and cyclist, I feel compelled to respond. What makes you feel that you have a greater right to the use of our public roadways than cyclists? I urge motorists and cyclists to work together to coexist on our roadways. But, I maintain my rights as a cyclist to use the public roadways.
BIKE SAFETY
September 7, 1999
To the editor: As president of the Lawrence Bicycle Club, I would like to respond to the letter by Dick Walker of Baldwin City regarding cyclists on his daily commute from Baldwin to Lawrence.
HELP THE VETS
September 7, 1999
To the editor: During the Vietnam War when the Buddhists wanted to make a point, one of them would douse himself with gasoline and set himself afire. It got the world’s attention. Russel Pentecost of Leavenworth had been trying unsuccessfully for years to make a point, and he felt no one was paying attention. His point was the U.S. government wasn’t keeping its promises to veterans. On July 22, 1999, he tried for the last time to get our attention. The man who adorned his pickup with a large sign which said, “One worthless U.S. veteran,” put a bullet first through his wife’s head, then his own. Russel Pentecost was not a deranged Vietnam Vet. He had fought in World War II and Korea, and retired from the Army after 20 years service, fully expecting his country to keep its promises, especially about health care and retirement benefits. According to him,
TURNOVER TIME
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Ah. We’ve just made it through another July 31/Aug. 1 cycle. One question each for the movers and the alley runners. I just do not understand the mentality of those disposing of good carpets, lamps, fans, tables, chairs, foodstuffs (unopened can goods and dry goods), children’s toys and other household items by leaving them at the curbside. If you really want to dispose of these things and are too lazy to contact one of the many local agencies that recycle these items couldn’t you at least seperate the wheat from the chaff? To the alley runners. OK, so it’s profitable to pick up many of the items. Why do you have to leave the piles in such a mess? Ah, what the heck. It’s just not worth it anyway. I guess it’s human nature. But I managed to blow off a little steam. Cheers.
FINCH/PERKINS LETTER
September 7, 1999
Punish the guilty To the editor:
WHY NURSES?
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Lawrence school district proposes a 15 percent increase in taxes and an 8 percent increase in taxes by the city for the property owners (Page 1A, July 30, Lawrence Journal-World).
UNFAIR CONCLUSION
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I wanted to write and take issue with an article that the Journal-World printed Aug. 8. The article was written by Karen Brandon, Knight-Ridder Newspapers and addresses the “Impact of Roe vs. Wade.” The article addresses a study done by Steven Levitt and John Donohue III concerning the effect abortion has had on crime statistics in the 1990s. Their conclusion was that the abortions that minority and poor women had in the 1970s, because abortion was made legal, have made a positive impact on the crime rate. The question I would like to raise is this; “How many of those little babies aborted from the womb would have grown up to be productive citizens?” How many would have grown to be great scientists, doctors, preachers, teachers, maybe even a future president of these United States? There is no way of knowing; they were murdered in the name of freedom of choice.
ENGLISH IS TAKING OVER THE WORLD
September 7, 1999
On the southern border of Texas, there is a very tiny town producing a very large fuss. In August, El Cenizo, pop. 7,800, became the first town in the United States to declare an official language that wasn’t English. From now on, the city’s business will be conducted in Spanish. This linguistic fact was enough to make newswires buzz and tongues wag. The activists at English First and U.S. English found new and creative ways to suggest that El Cenizo was about to bring the entire English-speaking country down. They described it as “our very own Quebec,” the “canary in the mine” and the proof of our “Balkanization.”
WORRIED FOR FUTURE
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Like many others, I was outraged and saddened to learn of the shabby treatment given by the Lawrence school administration to one of its premier educators, Stan Roth. Can it be true that after 40 years of inspired teaching, and despite the supporting testimony of legions of successful former students, this man has been removed from his life’s work for expressing a preference for science over religious dogma? Or maybe it wasn’t just the evolution vs. creationism thing. Maybe it was Stan’s tiresome insistence that students (1) pay attention in class, (2) show respect for the subject and the teacher, (3) prove themselves worthy of good grades, and (4) think, learn and experience things for themselves. How old-fashioned.
AN ILL WIND
September 7, 1999
To the editor: My grandson, a biology major at KU with career aspirations, holds Stan Roth in high esteem, a model of excellence. Stan’s inauspicious removal only increases his stature. He is irreplaceable. Those people responsible for this outrage get an “F,” encourage the mediocre. This railroading job smells like a feed lot with the wind in the wrong direction.
SEPT 7-40 YEARS AGO
September 7, 1999
The Kansas University chapter of the Delta Upsilon social fraternity was rated the organization’s best group in the country for the second time in the past six years. The DU group held a celebration party due to the honor.
HASKELL VS MID-AMER
September 7, 1999
Kirk Meyer/Journal-World Photo Haskell’s Darron Rhodd, right, attempts to turn the corner against Mid-America Nazarene JV defenders Monday night during the Fightin’ Indians’ season opener.
MAN FEARED DROWNED AT PERRY LAKE
September 7, 1999
Drowning feared at Perry Lake
HELMET SAVES DAY FOR INJURED CYCLIST
September 7, 1999
A 6-year-old Lawrence boy suffered a broken leg and concussion after being hit by a car operated by a suspected drunken driver Monday night. The boy, whose name was not released, was hit shortly after 7 p.m. while turning into his driveway in the 1500 block of East 28th Terrace, or about four blocks west of Prairie Park School. He suffered a broken right tibia, or shin bone, and a mild concussion.
NEW MISSION
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Well! Thank goodness THAT’s settled! That spooky “evolution theory” always did give me the heebie jeebies. “Descended from apes,” yeah, right. Not THIS Kansan, baby! It’s about time we expose that Darwin character for the crackpot he really was.
DEMANDING ACTION
September 7, 1999
To the editor: See! All you had to do was get mad just like me and start printing what the populace in general knew but wasn’t feeding back to the city powers-that-be! Congratulations!
WHO ARE THE TWITS?
September 7, 1999
To the editor: As a former student of Stan Roth and a near-lifetime resident of Lawrence, I am quite familiar with Mr. Roth’s approach to the obligations of both education and citizenship. Although he was often lacking in tact and occasionally short on patience, he possessed (and certainly still possesses) a full complement of integrity and an undeniable zest for teaching.
NO BACKBONE
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Not satisfied with the watering down of the state’s science standards at the hands of the State Board of Education, I see that our local school district has decided to lower the bar even further for Lawrence students by removing Stan Roth from the classroom. Although his occasionally confrontational style was interpreted by some as ridicule, it was in actuality a challenge to students to get off their duffs and do some thinking for themselves. Neither religious nor scientific dogma were welcome in his classroom. The beauty of his classroom experience was that it left you not with mere volumes of facts, but rather with increased ability for critical thinking. Such skills are highly valuable in any area of study and greatly prized by future employers.
QUOTABLE
September 7, 1999
“What I’m really looking for is a small class environment where you can really get to know the professors.” — 10-year-old Greg Smith, who started classes Monday as a freshman at Randolph-Macon College. Page 6A.
DEFENSE ATTORNEYS FORM PEER ASSOCIATION
September 7, 1999
A newly incorporated group provides mentoring for criminal defense attorneys practicing in Douglas County.
T STOP MID-ATLANTIC DROUGHT
September 7, 1999
VIRGINIA The remnants of Dennis spread rain across the mid-Atlantic states on Monday, but authorities said days of precipitation and flooding weren’t enough to cancel the devastating drought.
PHYSICIAN, EDUCATOR CONCERNED OVER CHANGES IN ORGAN ALLOCATION
September 7, 1999
A recent study says proposed changes in the way donated organs are allocated will cut down on the number of organ donors.
STATE REGULATION BIGGER, MORE INTRUSIVE
September 7, 1999
State government is involved in more areas of Kansas life than ever before, and it doesn’t show signs of getting smaller.
S SEAL VIOLATE THE SEPARATION OF
September 7, 1999
Does Moses being on Kansas University’s seal violate separation of church and state? Betsy Coons,
VE GOT TROUBLE
September 7, 1999
To the editor: After the State Board of Education’s shocking vote on science standards, I was dismayed and embarrassed for the state and deeply sorry and concerned for those small-town science teachers who might now be subject to pressure from conservative local religion forces that could have a negative impact on the teaching of biology, geology, and physics. I was even more concerned for the students of such districts. But I was, I will confess, comfortably, even smugly, complacent on a personal level about Lawrence. Surely our rational and educated community would have nothing to worry about.
LAUGHINGSTOCK
September 7, 1999
To the editor: You realize, of course, the Kansas State Board of Education has caused your entire state to become the current laughingstock of society. When the laughter turns to disgust, it’s bound to hurt your business.
HOSPITAL DELIVERS CLASS FOR PREGANT TEEN-AGERS
September 7, 1999
Lawrence Memorial Hospital’s new pregnancy class designed for teen-agers is set to debut today.
TRIBUTE FROM VIETNAM
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Thanks to the Internet, the mistakes of Lawrence school administrators can be broadcast around the world. And that is where you will find many of Stan Roth’s former students — like me, a 1988 LHS grad currently doing dissertation research into ethnobotanical tropical forest use in the mountains of Vietnam.
PRINCIPLED STAND
September 7, 1999
Haskell students and administrators deserve praise for taking a courageous stand against alcohol abuse on the Haskell campus. Haskell Indian Nations University and its students should be congratulated for their strong stand against alcohol abuse.
COMMUNITY COLLEGE SEEKS FORT HAYS AFFILIATION
September 7, 1999
Pratt Community College is seeking the relationship in an attempt to lower the community college’s mill levy, the highest in the state.
KU CORNERBACKS EXPECT TEST FROM CSN
September 7, 1999
The aerial circus is coming to town, and Kansas University football cornerbacks Andrew Davison and Quincy Roe will have a front-row seat. The Jayhawks (0-1) will play host to pass-happy Cal State Northridge (1-0) on Saturday. It’s likely the NCAA Div. I-AA Matadors will present a passing challenge unlike any other the Jayhawks will meet this season.
FREE STATE UPDATE
September 7, 1999
Even three days after its 28-21 loss to No. 1 Olathe North, Free State High’s football team still was … pleased? “I feel pretty good,” FSHS coach Bob Lisher said Monday, after evaluating films from Friday night’s game at Olathe District Activities Center. “Overall, everyone did well. We had some assignment breakdowns, things like that. But things that are correctable.
EXTRA EFFORT PAYS OFF FOR LHS FOOTBALL
September 7, 1999
Lawrence High head football coach Dirk Wedd put a premium on preparation before Friday’s season opener against Shawnee Mission North. Extra effort in practice likely factored in the Lions’ 17-11 come-from-behind victory over the Indians at Haskell Stadium.
TEACHING PRIORITY
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Great teachers, forever in short supply, today are far more scarce than new buildings or administrative appointees. When a notably fine teacher, distinguished for well over 40 years by the best academic and professional criteria, is tossed aside by a school system that favors administrative protocol and staff docility over learning, it is high time we all raise questions.
INSPIRED STUDENT
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Stan Roth is widely recognized as one of the best biology teachers in the country and was elected the president of National Association of Biology Teachers and has received many awards as an outstanding biology teacher. He challenges students to develop critical thinking skills not just memorize facts to pass tests. This approach is now a cornerstone of national science education reform.
GOOD NEIGHBORS
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Four years ago when I had to move from my home in Clinton, not knowing what to do, my neighbors, without me asking them, came with trailers and pickups and moved me into a mobile home in Lawrence.
GOLDEN RULE OF ROAD
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I’ve been tracking the recent letters concerning cyclists and motorists on our city streets and byways. Maybe if everyone involved would apply a little more of the Golden Rule and we had less accusing, excusing, complaining and explaining, things might be a little safer for everyone concerned. I do want to share a few observations I’ve made over the past few years.
CLIFFORD H. GASWINT
September 7, 1999
Services for Clifford H. Gaswint, 91, Wellsville, will be at 1:30 p.m. Friday at Wellsville United Methodist Church. Burial will be at 2 p.m. Saturday at Greenwood Cemetery, Clay Center. Mr. Gaswint died Sunday, Sept. 5, 1999, at Baldwin Care Center, Baldwin.
MS SOCIETY TO HOLD BIKE TOUR
September 7, 1999
MS Society to hold bike tour
CAUTIONARY TALE
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I have a cautionary tale for all who value the quality of life Lawrence still offers in spite of bypasses and resorts and unplanned growth.
RESPECT NEEDED
September 7, 1999
To the editor: During the past few years, I have had the opportunity to work on math education issues with the conservative members of the Kansas State Board of Education. They are, to me, friends and colleagues. However, if these KSBE members are suggesting that “creationism” should be allowed in the Kansas science curriculum, I am absolutely opposed to them on that issue — if that is indeed their position.
TEACHERS AGREE TO WORK PACT
September 7, 1999
Detroit teachers, who illegally walked off the job last week, on early Monday evening agreed to a tentative three-year contract. Earlier in the day, the teachers took their message to the streets in a Labor Day protest. SEE STORY PAGE 3A
ATTEMPT MADE ON MUBARAK
September 7, 1999
A man armed with a knife slashed at Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and lightly grazed his arm Monday before being shot to death by presidential bodyguards in the Suez Canal city of Port Said. SEE STORY PAGE 2A
FSHS PLAYER OF WEEK
September 7, 1999
Brian Erb Free State
HOMEBUYER WORKSHOP TO BE HELD IN BALDWIN
September 7, 1999
Homebuyer workshop to be held in Baldwin
UNJUSTIFIED INTOLERANCE
September 7, 1999
To the editor: As readers rightly criticize the state board of education’s new science standards, it is good to remember that creationists don’t cause all the conflicts between science and religion. In an editorial in the journal, Science, Stephen Jay Gould has inappropriately attacked a significant Christian belief. Gould, holder of the Agassiz Chair in Zoology at Harvard, displays the arrogance for which he criticizes opponents of evolution (vol. 284, 6/25/99). Using emotive language unsuitable to scientific inquiry, he attacks the belief that human beings are created in the image of God. This belief is not limited to creationists, and you don’t have to be a literalist to believe it. It is widely held among Christians and Jews. Gould ridicules this belief as a “false comfort,” a “crutch,” and an example of “false projections of our needs.” He goes on to call this belief a “pretty or parochial comfort … conjured by our swollen neurology to obscure the source of our physical being….”
POOR MANAGEMENT
September 7, 1999
To the editor: As I sat in Mr. Roth’s biology and advanced biology classes he taught me one important thing: look at all the facts then form your hypothesis rather than looking at only one fact, it not only makes sense, but it is good science. Unfortunately, his “new” administration chose to look at only one fact, and many students are going to miss out on what he can teach them.
S LESSONS ON THE ROAD
September 7, 1999
Two lifelong Lawrence friends are postponing college for one year to tour the United States and Canada by pickup.
ARTISTS, ART LOVERS GET A GLIMPSE OF PARIS
September 7, 1999
The next day, with art supplies, paintings, gifts and memories packed, the group began the journey back to Kansas and back to daily routines. They say once you visit Paris you really never leave because it is always with you ” the “Moveable Feast,” a memory for life.
LHS PLAYER OF THE WEEK
September 7, 1999
Joel Dankenbring Class: Senior.
DEDICATED TEACHER
September 7, 1999
To the editor, I graduated from Lawrence High School in 1968 and have many memories of my years there. Some of these memories are good and some not so good. I can remember a math teacher who thought coaching basketball was more important than teaching math, an American government teacher who thought teaching was telling the students to read the textbook and another teacher who thought denigrating students in public was a fun thing to do.
IRONIC DECISION
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I never took biology. I did not ever have Stan Roth as a teacher. But from the day I started attending LHS There was something very special about the hall outside his biology classroom. He was one of those teachers everyone knew about. His intensity and knowledge resounded outside the classes he taught. He is one of a very few great teachers I have ever known.
MANGLED ANTHEM
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Daniel E. Smith’s letter in the J-W on Aug. 1was a wonderful tribute to a young lady who had the courage to agree to sing our national anthem in public and had a bit of trouble with it. This is not an easy song to sing, rehearsed or otherwise, and I admire her willingness to be volunteered to sing it. The audience response when she had problems was wonderful. I am certain that it was a moving movement — I would like to have been there.
September 7, 1999
To the editor: The Journal-World calls the late Lane Kirkland a “labor boss” (8/15/99, page 2A).
KEY TO SUCCESS
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I would like to offer my thoughts concerning the dismissal of Stan Roth from the Lawrence public school system (LJW Aug. 30). I had the privilege of studying under Mr. Roth as a sophomore at Lawrence High in 1993-1994. I also accompanied Mr. Roth, his wife, and several other students on a 1995 research field trip to Hawaii. Currently, I am a senior studying English and art history at KU, and in all my years of study, both in Kansas and for one year in England, I can honestly say that Mr. Roth was the greatest teacher I’ve ever encountered.
ROTH WAS MENTOR
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I have known Mr. Roth since sixth grade when he helped launch my scientific career. He supplied planaria (flatworms) so that I could study regeneration for my school science fair project. My next encounter was during my freshman year at Lawrence High School. Mr. Roth allowed me to be one of his teacher’s assistants, a position I held throughout high school.
UNFAIR DECISIONS
September 7, 1999
To the editor: I am writing this letter in reference to the city commission’s decision to not renew the license for the Brown Bear Brewing Co. Perhaps the Lawrence City Commission has not only failed to realize that by doing so, they have enraged an entire neighborhood. No, I am not referring to Downtown Lawrence; I am referring to those that reside in North Lawrence. I attended that meeting in hopes to come to some compromise regarding the Los Amigos licensure. I made the mistake of leaving after the topic was voted upon.
RESORT JETTY
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Damage to boats and docks at the Clinton Marina in October 1998 and April 1999 were a consequence of the wave action from moderately severe storms but primarily due to the high lake level from recent rains which submerged the protective jetty south of the marina. Waves of water easily reached the marina unimpeded by the jetty, and over $100,000 damage to boats and docks occurred in each instance.
ST. JO CONDOLENCES
September 7, 1999
To the editor: Condolences are in order for the education system of Kansas, and what better place to start than the home of the Jayhawks? I had always been told the Jayhawk original was a pterodactyl over 60 million years old. You may have to revise that. I attended the State Board of Education meeting August 10, and found that, by a margin of 6 of 4, the powers that be think Genesis is just as good science as paleontology, so the Jayhawk can’t be over 6,000! (I wonder there aren’t any painted on cave walls or in the pyramids. Wouldn’t one have made a great mummy?)
LOCAL BOARD LAUDED
September 7, 1999
To the editor: My thanks to the Lawrence school board for their vote Monday objecting to the science curriculum proposed by the Kansas State Board of Religion — oops! I mean Board of Education. My children are taught religion at their church. They should be taught science at our public schools.
SCHOOLS BEGIN POLICY MANUAL REVISION
September 7, 1999
Parts of the Lawrence school board’s policy manual will be deleted or revised following an audit that judged it inadequate.
WHAT DO THEY FEAR?
September 7, 1999
To the editor: While I was growing up, I was taught about the theory of evolution in all of my science classes. None of my teachers mentioned the so-called “creationist” theory. In fact, the teachers all taught evolution as if it were an absolute, proven fact. My children have experienced the same thing here in the Lawrence school system. This teaching of theory as fact has always seemed amusing to me. No one I know argues against the concept of micro-evolution, namely that a species may change in response to its environment — see the white to black moths of England — because the evidence is obvious and demonstratable. Please note that this change did not take millions of years but occurred in a relatively short time span. But, no one during my life has ever come forward with similar proof of macro-evolution — the changing of one species into a separate and distinct species. Yet, we find macro-evolution defended as if it were fact and almost as if it were the holy grail of science. Please note, even Einstein’s theories of relativity are still taught as theories because not all aspects of them have been proven even though most scientists accept the theories as “fact”. Why, then, do so-called “scientific” people object to the board suggesting that evolution should be taught more as a theory instead of presented as a proven and established fact? What are they afraid of?
BUSINESS BRIEFCASE FOR TUESDAY
September 7, 1999
Company rolls out computerless e-mail