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Do you expect anniversaries of World War II events such as D-Day and Pearl Harbor to be commemorated in the same way in 25 years as they are today?

Response Percent Votes
No.
 
60% 352
Yes.
 
39% 231
Total 583

Comments

canyon_wren 5 years, 6 months ago

I would like to think so, but I voted no. Those who are determined to discredit our country have accomplished so much in the way of debunking our history, and, coupled with the anti-war sentiment that seems to predominate, I am afraid that in another 25 years (if our country is still "viable") the efforts made in the past to secure our freedom and that of Europe will be totally forgotten. I hope I am wrong.

Ernest Barteldes 5 years, 6 months ago

I voted no for one simple reason - the country's collective memory is not great. Just as happened to the anniversaries of the end of WW1 and The Civil War, those celebrations counted on the existence of survivors from the era. As those slowly pass away (my grandfather served in the Navy in WW2 - he passed away at 91 two years ago --- see my "Funeral" blog), fewer become interested in remembering the dates.

One example - the main street of Staten Island, NY (where I reside) is called Victory Boulevard http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York... . It was dedicated in 1918 to celebrate the end of the First War. For many years, people remembered and celebrated that date here. Today, few even know why the avenue has that name.

Here in New York, every year we remember those who died on 9-11, and all the local stations (save PBS) broadcast a reading of the names of the dead by surviving family members. That tradition will go on for years -- but I dont see it happening in say, two decades.

tangential_reasoners_anonymous 5 years, 6 months ago

Naively, I would like to think things might change to a degree that such episodes of human history might simply fall from our minds.

Of course, then we'd just have to repeat them.

Alia Ahmed 5 years, 6 months ago

I think it won't be remembered or honored in the same way in 25 years because none of the men who served at that time will be alive and sine of the children of those men won't be alive. I think it will be remembered but in a different way without the personal accounts of those service personnel. Also, we don't know what will have transpired in those 25 years in terms of significant historical events.

gsxr600 5 years, 6 months ago

In 25 years none of the soldiers that served our nation in that time will be alive to tell there stories once again. And probably within 25 years there will be another war of some kind to worry about or some devastating terrorist attack to commemorate. I'm not Nostradamus here, but something will happen, guaranteed.

Leslie Swearingen 5 years, 6 months ago

What about VJ day? Why focus on Europe and totally forget there was a war in the Pacific at the same time. The ending to that conflict was a lot more dramatic and there was just as much death and brutality as in Europe.

Leslie Swearingen 5 years, 6 months ago

Okay, everyone write, fix this! Fix it now! at the same time and then hit the submit button. Sorry, I am getting tired of them. I never know when I have posted or not.

Leslie Swearingen 5 years, 6 months ago

Okay, everyone write, fix this! Fix it now! at the same time and then hit the submit button. Sorry, I am getting tired of this. I never know when I have posted or not.

bearded_gnome 5 years, 6 months ago

absolutely: what Canyon-wren said!

I also think it can't be remembered the same way in 25 years because these heroes won't be among us. their sacrifice will not be first person. but that puts more responsibility on us, read, go to the sites, remember!


Irish, you are again an idiot. who's talking about VE day?

and thanks to the two nuclear bombs, we didn't have to invade the japanese islands, a minimum of three bloody invasions maybe 6million japanese dead, 2million american soldiers dead, 1million british/colonials dead, estimated in such an operation.

D-Day absolutely should be honored. it is easily one of the most important dates in human history, along with Lepanto (1571). and Nelson's victory at Trefalgur.

Leslie Swearingen 5 years, 6 months ago

bearded_gnome, I am not an idiot. I am an intelligent and well read woman. I was trying to make a comparison. I am well aware that VE, VJ, and D Day are all different things. Why don't we read more about the war in the Pacific and what happened to the Japanese in those internment camps. Lawrence has an excellent artist, Roger Shimamura, who has had paintings on display at Spenser reflecting his families involvement in this. If you disagree with me, and I have no problem with that, please do it in a respectful manner and I will try to do likewise and curb my emotion mind.

bearded_gnome 5 years, 6 months ago

Irish, the reason for my passion is this: today is june 6th, as I pointed out, an extremely important date in history. the paper is doing right to honor the veterans who sacrificed on D-Day today. nobody was talking about VE-day (victory in europe day). you apparently object to honoring the D-Day vets, or focusing in this most important date. I find that deeply offensive.

yes, what happened in the pacific was important. we have books on that too. I recently read a series of books by Edward L. Beach (if you've watched history channel, you've probably seen him). this series was a masterful fictional telling of the life and struggles of American submariners in the western pacific fighting the Japanese in WWII.

however, today is reserved for the vets who landed on, came ashore on, hitler's "fortress europe. rightly described as the largest seaborn invasion in modern history. we should be able to honor them without some woman saying "but what about ... ."

and, no, frequently your posts do not indicate that you are well read on a topic.

George_Braziller 5 years, 6 months ago

It will still be remembered but probably differently when it becomes absorbed by a broader celebration. Memorial Day is an example where the original event changed with the times and the loss of the collective memory.

Leslie Swearingen 5 years, 6 months ago

Okay, Bearded Gnome, thank you for being courteous in this post. I agree with you. I really can't explain why suddenly I was so concerned about the Pacific because to tell the truth I hadn't even thought about it until then. I think sometimes I get the urge to be contrary just because-must be the Irish in be don't you think. Can't be the Dutch half. I agree that D-Day is still very important. Our men went though hell going though that and what followed and yet come home and did their jobs. We need to remember what they did and what they did it for. I think the men of that generation did things they hated to do, absolutely did not want to do, but they refused to bow out because it was ugly, filthy and bloody. They gave the west new life and new meaning. Their sacrifices created the new American middle class prosperity. I do thank them and appreciate what they did. I will try harder in my writing.

Todd Epp 5 years, 6 months ago

Your answer is found in the present: Do we celebrate the end of the Civil War, the Spanish American War and WWI anymore? What about their major battles? Why not? Because the service members and their families from those eras are all gone. All that is left are the memorials.

It is tragic but true. I'm guessing in 25 or 50 or 75 years, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, and the Gulf Wars will be treated the same way--largely forgotten, left to the history books (or history websites). It's human nature.

We should never forget about our service men's and women's service and sacrifice but human memory is a fickle thing.

Todd Epp Middle Border Sun http://www.middlebordersun.com

jaywalker 5 years, 6 months ago

I want to thank all the posters here who weighed in so thoughtfully. I reluctantly clicked on, nervous to read what some of our more disrespectful, poorly informed brethren may have submitted. I'm so happy to have read what you all had to say. Kudos. Bearded got a tad testy, but considering how these strings so often devolve, not too shabby.

To the question, I'm torn between Alia's opinion and something along the lines of Pilgrim. I hope so 'cuz of all the lessons that period in history has taught us. Time will tell.

sourpuss 5 years, 6 months ago

We'll pay as much attention to WWII in 25-50 years as we pay to the Spanish-American War now. Remember the Maine? Hardly.

bearded_gnome 5 years, 6 months ago

jaywalker, of course I got testy. its June 6th, we're honoring the incredible sacrifice, courage and determination of an amazing generation, and somebody comes along and says "hey, but what about ..."

I felt it reasonable to speak up.
I agree with you, I'm so glad none of the nutbags came on here today. I too had the same thought when I first tuned in here.


and agnostic, I think I understand your RTFQ, I should have written my first comment slightly different, something like: I absolutely agree with Canyon-wren. it could read the "absolutely" I wrote could be taken as "absolutely" in answer to the question. I think that's what you mean Aggie.


Irish, thank you very much. today is not a day to diminish what was achieved on June 6 1944. certainly not and I appreciate what you have since written.

try visiting hawaii on December 7th.

try growing up in california where the collective memory does still recall that for months after december 7, 1941, there was real fear of a japanese invasion. the rose bowl was moved inland jan 1 1942.

but today, is june 6, 1944's anniversary.

irish if you want to read interesting stuff, read about john Steinbeck's work during WWII. he was a war correspondent, but went earlier in the war to north africa his book "once there was a war" is incredibly moving. and I mention it here because he gets you close to those americans fighting in WWII. it is gritty, moving, and intense. he traveled on a troopship with some, including some black troops. later in the war, he wrote, spoke on radio, had books distributed behind NAZI lines that encouraged the underground, and he helped make movies if I remember correctly.

western europe, britain, are free because of june 6, 1944. the story of the horrible bloodbath when our troops started on Omaha beach, as told by Stephen Ambrose, I can never forget.

M. Lindeman 5 years, 6 months ago

canyon_wren (Anonymous) says…

I would like to think so, but I voted no. Those who are determined to discredit our country have accomplished so much in the way of debunking our history, and, coupled with the anti-war sentiment that seems to predominate, I am afraid that in another 25 years (if our country is still “viable”) the efforts made in the past to secure our freedom and that of Europe will be totally forgotten. I hope I am wrong

rdragon writes

There is not much to add to that, well said.

"as we give our freedoms away, so will the honor of those who served us so well."

bearded_gnome 5 years, 6 months ago

Todd Epp writes: Your answer is found in the present: Do we celebrate the end of the Civil War, the Spanish American War and WWI anymore? What about their major battles?

---small correction, Juneteenth is certainly still celebrated.

when you open a can of beans, you're celebrating the Civil War.

I hope that future generations will not let rememberance of WWII slip to that level.

History Channel has some wonderful D-Day material on this evening!

BigPrune 5 years, 6 months ago

In 25 years, most of the players in this war will be dead and buried. It reminds me of the last civil war soldiers - nobody celebrates what they fought for, and nobody celebrates or memorializes what the WWI vets fought for. It will be all forgotten. By that time, we will no longer be a democracy. We will be a dictatorship ala Obama.

My answer is, "no."

jaywalker 5 years, 6 months ago

bearded,

Hey, brother, don't take me wrong. I was just addin' a qualifier, I know where you're comin' from.

feefifofum 5 years, 6 months ago

I read somewhere that the 40th anniversary of any big historic event is usually the last big commemoration. Interest gradually diminishes until a sharp rise with the Centennial celebration and then rapidly drops away. That is why I voted "no" on the poll. D-Day will probably still have siginificant memorials every 5 years due to the mortality rate of the WW II vet. But, in 25 years they will all most certainly be gone. This year's ceremony was very impressive.

Fred Whitehead Jr. 5 years, 6 months ago

I voted no because our masters with their dear leader will prohibit it.

We are selling our country and all its commerce to the Chinese and likely their neighbors, the North Koreans. They will soon own the U.S. and all its people and will rule over us with their iron fist they use today on their own people. They will abolish freedom and the entire country will have to learn Chinese language.

Think I am crazy? Look at the lable in the back of your clothing. Look at the lable on that ice tea maker you just bought. Look at who is buying up U.S. Treasury bills like there is no tomorrow. There isn't for the U.S.

George_Braziller 5 years, 6 months ago

The meaning of the D-Day anniversary will eventually change over time and take on a broader embrace as after all who were alive at the time it happened are gone.

Originally, Memorial Day was to honor the Union casualties of the Civil War. Armistice Day originally was to recognize the U.S. dead from World War I and was established on November 11 which was the date the armistice was signed. After World War II the name Armistice Day was changed to Veteran's Day.

George_Braziller 5 years, 6 months ago

The meaning of the D-Day anniversary will eventually change over time and take on a broader embrace after all who were alive at the time it happened are gone.

Originally, Memorial Day was to honor the Union casualties of the Civil War. Armistice Day originally was to recognize the U.S. dead from World War I and was established on November 11 which was the date the armistice was signed. After World War II the name Armistice Day was changed to Veteran's Day.

Leslie Swearingen 5 years, 6 months ago

bearded_gnome John Steinbeck and Stephen Ambrose, I will read them, thanks for the reference.

Leslie Swearingen 5 years, 6 months ago

Okey, Dokey, just ordered them from Amazon. Once There Was a War: John Steinbeck Citizen Soldiers: The U. S. Army from the Normandy Beaches to the Bulge to the Surrender of Germany Stephen E. Ambrose Got them both for a little under twenty dollars. They better be good, Bearded One! :-)

jonas_opines 5 years, 6 months ago

"Look at who is buying up U.S. Treasury bills like there is no tomorrow."

Nothing I have read from credible and knowledgable sources suggest that the Chinese have any interest in "owning" the United States. (whatever that means) The reason the Chinese have been purchasing so many of our Treasury Bills is to keep their currency artificially pegged to the dollar, for stability purposes.

I know that's much less exciting, but there it is.

Orwell 5 years, 6 months ago

I guess nothing's too remote a topic to inspire a little divisive right-wing propaganda.

bearded_gnome 5 years, 6 months ago

jonas, how dare you upset his little rant with a fact.


Irish, there are at least two other D-day books I think by Stephen Ambrose, I just read one and it wasn't "citizen soldiers.

if you look, you can also find the book Steinbeck wrote that was such an encouragement to many underground movements across europe, maybe it is "the moon is down" or it is "burning brightly" I've read all his works, and get the titles confused sometimes!


Bronzie, when you get TOSsed off again, for the 9th time, will you come back with the screen name Oedipus?

Shelley Bock 5 years, 6 months ago

Sorry canyon_wren, I don't agree with you. And, Marion, as always, you can never see the truth because you can't accept the truth (remember, you say no night games at Lawrence High, see you this fall when games begin in the nightime at 7:00 PM)

I consider myself a raging liberal that sees this country as moving towards justice and fairness with a tremendous President, instead of the communism that Marion talks about.

At the same time, I take great pride in the accomplishments of my father who joined the Marines prior to WW2 and ultimately served over 30 years. When he was alive, I always called him on August 7, September 16 and December 26 for Guadalcanal Day, Peliliu Day and New Britain Day, as I called it. My now adult daughters know the significance of those days.

When they have children, they will know the significance as well. Maybe, just maybe, it will live beyond them. I only hope they share the pride I have.

If you heard the President's speach, how many of you knew the comment about the "boys from Maine" who held the line? That was a reference to the fight of the 20th Maine at Gettysburg. Some historians have written that their effort was the event that insured a Union victory there and, ultimately, saved the Union. They are remembered. So will the 1st Infantry, 2nd Rangers, Easy Company, 502 PIR, 101st Airborne on D-Day. But, as well, the 1st Marine Division at Guadalcanal and Peliliu, and later at Okinawa.

Good people remember the past. They'll respect the scarifice and work towards avoiding conflicts in the future.

bearded_gnome 5 years, 6 months ago

the 20th Maine at Gettysburg. Some historians have written that their effort was the event that insured a Union victory there and, ultimately, saved the

---Hepburn, that was Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain's unit, amazing heroism.

nice to see the fields in at lhs and fshs. thank you for the info you posted on them several months ago.

jonas_opines 5 years, 6 months ago

gnome: I know, I know.

oh, wait.

I mean: 对,我知道。可是,我认为他的故事有点奇怪。

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