Archive for Tuesday, January 22, 2002

All stories

Horoscopes
January 22, 2002
Local Briefs
January 22, 2002
Pelathe Center gives toys to American Indian children American Indian children in Lawrence had their pick of dolls, footballs and board games Monday in a giveaway at the Pelathe Community Resource Center. The center had the giveaway as part of its “Make a Difference Day” activities celebrating Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday. The toys were donated by the American Indian Heritage Foundation in Virginia. More than 300 American Indian children were invited to the giveaway, and about 100 showed up. A second event to give away late-arriving books also donated by the foundation may happen in the next few weeks. For more information, call Pelathe at 841-7202. _______________________________ Education: KU senators seek students’ input on tuition increase Student senators at Kansas University want to know what students think about proposed tuition increases. They’re holding a meeting at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the Kansas Union’s Alderson Auditorium to discuss the issue. “We want to get a vision about where we want to go,” said Anna Gregory, communications director. “We want to plan out a process for how students and administrators should work on this.” Last week, about 20 students mostly student senators attended a Kansas Board of Regents meeting to protest KU’s process in the tuition proposals. They said students haven’t had enough input in the discussions. KU administrators say they plan to hold a series of meetings with students between now and April, when a final proposal will be submitted to the Board of Regents. _______________________________ Leadership: Kansas Land Trust names new executive director A Lawrence attorney and urban planner has taken over as the new executive director of the Kansas Land Trust and opened the nonprofit group’s first business office. The Land Trust’s board announced Monday that RoxAnne Miller of Lawrence has been named the group’s new executive director. Miller holds a master’s degree in urban planning from Kansas University and practiced real estate and land-use law with the firm of Lathrop & Gage in Kansas City, Mo., from 1995 to 2001. Miller replaces Laurie Ward, who had held the post since 1998. Ward will continue working with the land conservation organization as special projects director, focusing on fund raising and public relations. Miller will work out of an office at 16 E. 13th St. in Lawrence, which is the first office for the 12-year-old Kansas Land Trust. _______________________________ Traffic: Oil slick appears downtown A mysterious oil slick Monday afternoon stained the northbound lane in the 600 block of New Hampshire Street, causing slick driving for motorists. Lawrence Police were sent to check the substance, which apparently was spilled or dumped from a passing vehicle, and called for a city Public Works street crew to clean it up. Police said they had no reports of accidents. Police do not know what or who might have caused the oil slick, which appeared to originate at the intersection of Seventh and New Hampshire streets and spread north for most of the 600 block.
Local Briefs
January 22, 2002
Pelathe Center gives toys to American Indian children American Indian children in Lawrence had their pick of dolls, footballs and board games Monday in a giveaway at the Pelathe Community Resource Center. The center had the giveaway as part of its “Make a Difference Day” activities celebrating Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday. The toys were donated by the American Indian Heritage Foundation in Virginia. More than 300 American Indian children were invited to the giveaway, and about 100 showed up. A second event to give away late-arriving books also donated by the foundation may happen in the next few weeks. For more information, call Pelathe at 841-7202. _______________________________ Education: KU senators seek students’ input on tuition increase Student senators at Kansas University want to know what students think about proposed tuition increases. They’re holding a meeting at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the Kansas Union’s Alderson Auditorium to discuss the issue. “We want to get a vision about where we want to go,” said Anna Gregory, communications director. “We want to plan out a process for how students and administrators should work on this.” Last week, about 20 students mostly student senators attended a Kansas Board of Regents meeting to protest KU’s process in the tuition proposals. They said students haven’t had enough input in the discussions. KU administrators say they plan to hold a series of meetings with students between now and April, when a final proposal will be submitted to the Board of Regents. _______________________________ Leadership: Kansas Land Trust names new executive director A Lawrence attorney and urban planner has taken over as the new executive director of the Kansas Land Trust and opened the nonprofit group’s first business office. The Land Trust’s board announced Monday that RoxAnne Miller of Lawrence has been named the group’s new executive director. Miller holds a master’s degree in urban planning from Kansas University and practiced real estate and land-use law with the firm of Lathrop & Gage in Kansas City, Mo., from 1995 to 2001. Miller replaces Laurie Ward, who had held the post since 1998. Ward will continue working with the land conservation organization as special projects director, focusing on fund raising and public relations. Miller will work out of an office at 16 E. 13th St. in Lawrence, which is the first office for the 12-year-old Kansas Land Trust. _______________________________ Traffic: Oil slick appears downtown A mysterious oil slick Monday afternoon stained the northbound lane in the 600 block of New Hampshire Street, causing slick driving for motorists. Lawrence Police were sent to check the substance, which apparently was spilled or dumped from a passing vehicle, and called for a city Public Works street crew to clean it up. Police said they had no reports of accidents. Police do not know what or who might have caused the oil slick, which appeared to originate at the intersection of Seventh and New Hampshire streets and spread north for most of the 600 block.
Edith Catherine Elston
January 22, 2002
Soldier’s thanks
January 22, 2002
Harold D. Unruh
January 22, 2002
Powell E. Hill
January 22, 2002
Hyla Elaine Holcom
January 22, 2002
Corporate power
January 22, 2002
Slifer services
January 22, 2002
Floyd David Freeman
January 22, 2002
Daily Ticker
January 22, 2002
Nancy Lois Pessoni
January 22, 2002
Old home town - 25, 40, and 100 years ago today
January 22, 2002
On the record
January 22, 2002