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Archive for Sunday, January 5, 1992

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PARDON BAD PRECEDENT
January 5, 1992
To the editor: The Constitution of the United States is like a very delicate fabric. As citizens, we are responsible for protecting and preserving it in whatever way is necessary if we want our system of government to survive.
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January 5, 1992
Two years after its formation, M-PACT, the Eudora-based manufacturer of orthopedic casting equipment, is preparing to capitalize on its new position in a growing industry. In that vein, the company, which was created by the merger of Orthopedic Casting Laboraties and Martin Medical of DeSoto, is looking for several major developments in 1992, says Jim Martin, its president.
POLISH HOME LEFT LONG AGO
January 5, 1992
Teresa Jurkowski moved to Kansas from New Jersey in September after her husband’s death, but she left her first home in Poland as a 9-year-old under the orders of Stalin. Then, Mrs. Jurkowski recalled, she, her mother and younger brother were taken in the middle of the night by Stalin’s troops, put into cattle cars and sent by rail to southern Siberia.
BAD KNEE HINDERED JAMISON
January 5, 1992
Alonzo Jamison came to Big D with a bad knee unbeknownest to Kansas basketball fans. The 6-6 senior forward apparently hurt himself during last Thursday night’s game in Allen Fieldhouse.
ROOF WORK STILL PLENTIFUL WITHIN CITY
January 5, 1992
Local roofers say they are benefiting from the mild winter, which has allowed them to keep working on homes damaged during a spring hailstorm that caused millions of dollars worth of damage in Lawrence. Donna Thomas, whose husband, Tim, owns Anchor Roofing & Painting, said Friday that “he’ll be working all winter.”
IT WAS IN THE BAG
January 5, 1992
Local law enforcement people and game wardens drew flak about 25 years ago after the Incident of the Baldwin Bear, but at least they didn’t wind up as embarrassed as a similar group the past year in Keithville, La. A 175-pound black bear was treed in neighboring Baldwin in 1966. Despite all sorts of humane efforts to get the animal down, and out of harm’s way, including the use of tranquilizer darts, the hostile bear finally had to be killed for fear it would become a menace. There wasn’t quite the furor then that there might be in today’s more sentimental ecological climate, but there still were animal-lovers throughout the region who were clearly disturbed by the handling of the case.
PHOTOGRAPHER FINDS SUCCESS IN NATIONAL COMPETITIONS
January 5, 1992
Sometimes the business of art is business, as local photographer G. Mark Smith has discovered. “You really have to work to be seen,” he said. “Most artists don’t work well in the real world. I happen to be left- and right-minded.”
KU WOMEN THIRD IN TOURNEY
January 5, 1992
Host Florida International jumped out to an early 13-0 lead in the first 4:23, but 17th-ranked Kansas didn’t stay down long. KU’s women’s basketball team improved to 11-1 with an 81-69 win and placed third in the FIU Sun & Fun Classic. Junior Shannon Kite broke the ice for Kansas with a three-point basket at the 15-minute mark. Kite finished with 14 points, including four of seven treys.
MAN CONVICTED OF RAPE INCLUDED ON PAROLE LIST
January 5, 1992
A 34-year-old Leavenworth man convicted of raping and sodomizing a Kansas University student almost 12 years ago is eligible for parole this month, the Kansas Parole Board has announced. Willie Dotson was sentenced in 1981 to four terms of 15 years to life imprisonment on two counts of rape and two counts of aggravated sodomy. The sentences were to run concurrently. The charges stem from the Sept. 2, 1980, rape and sodomy of a Lawrence woman near the Kansas River Bridge as the victim walked home from a night class at KU. Dotson currently is serving his sentences at the Lansing Correctional Facility.
MARY LOOMIS
January 5, 1992
Services for Mary Anderson Loomis, 89, Lawrence, will be at a later date in Meadville, Pa. Inurnment will be in Mantorville, Minn. Mrs. Loomis died Saturday, Jan. 4, 1992, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital after a brief illness.
GENE ROOD
January 5, 1992
Services for Gene Kay Rood, 78, Littleton, Colo., are pending at Rumsey Funeral Home. Mr. Rood died Saturday, Jan. 4, 1992, at Mercy Medical Center in Denver.
FOR THE RECORD
January 5, 1992
Law enforcement report Police reports
HENRY HETTINGER
January 5, 1992
Services for Henry D. Hettinger, 76, Greeley, will be 10 a.m. Tuesday at Adamson Memorial Chapel here. Burial will be in Lakeview Cemetery in Windsor. Mr. Hettinger died Friday, Jan. 3, 1992, at the Bonell Good Samaritan Center in Greeley.
UNNECESSARY RISK
January 5, 1992
A battle currently is under way between a consumer group and the federal Food and Drug Administration over the safety of silicone-gel breast implants. The surface issues in this debate are disturbing enough, but the social standard that feeds the controversy may be even more cause for concern. An organization called Public Citizen Health Group Thursday urged the FDA to ban silicone breast implants immediately rather than leave them on the market while safety concerns about the implants are studied. The FDA reports 2,500 illnesses or injuries associated with the breast implants, but Public Citizen estimates that hundreds of thousands of women who received the implants have suffered complications, including ruptures, leaks and hardness. Silicone leaking into the body also has been linked to cancer and serious connective tissue diseases, according to the consumer group.
S LEGACY PRESERVED ON DISCS
January 5, 1992
Tenor saxophonist Stan Getz was jazzdom’s transcendent melodist. And though he passed away last year at age 64, “The Sound” still stands alone at the summit of improvisatory lyricism. Getz was nothing less than “the Mozart of jazz.” His solos, like the compositions of Amadeus, always embodied the quintessence of artful design, classically proportioned balances, dramatic shifts between tension and release, and the kind of seemingly effortless and virtuosic brilliance that, while loved by man, also had to have been loved by the Creator.
T SLOW LOCAL MOVIE THEATER BUSINESS
January 5, 1992
Longer lines at unemployment offices may have shortened box office lines at movie theaters across the country. But Lawrence’s movie houses have been somewhat insulated from the economic downturn, say local theater managers.
WOODLING SUNDAY COLUMN
January 5, 1992
Notes and quotes while wondering why they don’t just cancel the rest of the NFL season and let Miami and Washington duke it out in Super Bowl XXVI… Although the Kansas-Wichita State basketball game next Wednesday will be televised live in this area on the Jayhawk Network (channels 13 and 62), in Wichita it’ll be available only on pay-per-view at a pricey $19.95. Levitt Arena is sold out…
HOSPITAL REPORT
January 5, 1992
DISMISSALS Steven Thomas Hall, Overland Park; Jennifer Trowbridge and baby girl, Oskaloosa.
S WEST SIDE
January 5, 1992
Some trees are missing on the city’s west side, and evidence points to the handiwork of a busy beaver. That’s right, one or more of those dam-building mammals seem to have taken up residence within the city limits.
SKIPPING SCHOOL
January 5, 1992
Don Clancy, coordinator of cooperative occupational training at Lawrence High School, didn’t go straight into teaching after earning his education degree in 1979. “There was just no money in it,” Clancy said.
PROGRAM AT HARVARD BECKONS LOCAL NEIGHBORHOOD ORGANIZER
January 5, 1992
Steve Lopes loves grass-roots organizing whether it’s a teachers’ union local chapter, a political campaign or a neighborhood group. “That’s what I live for. It’s fun. There’s a lot of frustration too,” said Lopes, a Lawrence resident for eight years. “But I think it’s really neat to take a bunch of people and help them solve problems.”
NON-TRADITIONAL CASTING
January 5, 1992
Today you’re as likely to see Morgan Freeman, Denzel Washington and Raul Julia perform a wide variety of Shakespearean parts in New York as you are Kevin Kline or Christopher Plummer. Meanwhile, in contemporary films audiences see Native-American actors such as Graham Greene perform roles that once went to Chuck Connors. Casting directors now look at Asian-American actors such as John Lone, Mako or Joan Chen when casting Asian parts, whereas before they would choose Paul Muni or Luise Rainer.
COUNTY TO BEGIN REAPPORTIONMENT
January 5, 1992
Douglas County commissioners will sit down in about two weeks to begin what could be something of an arduous political task redrawing the lines of the county’s three commission districts. Chris McKenzie, county administrator, says the boundary lines need to be reworked because the 1990 census shows the districts are disproportionate in terms of population.
CITY, COUNTY SET EYES ON HIGHWAY FUNDING
January 5, 1992
With the start of the 1992 Legislature only eight days away, Lawrence and Douglas County officials are making final preparations on their pitches for proposals and projects. Now the question is: How accommodating will legislators be to the goals sought by the city and county?
FIRST-HALF SURGE BOOSTS KU
January 5, 1992
Eight and a half was enough. Minutes, that is. Kansas turned it on for the last 8 minutes of the first half and that was enough for the Jayhawks to stop Southern Methodist, 79-67, on Saturday night in Moody Coliseum.
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January 5, 1992
When the Kansas Legislature convenes Jan. 13 in Topeka, state lawmakers face a potential powder keg: State agency budgets are extremely tight, a judge’s ultimatum requires them to fix the state’s school finance law and the public still wants property tax relief. “I would anticipate it will be the most volatile session in many, many years,” said Russell Getter, a Kansas University associate professor of political science who specializes in Kansas government and politics.
BALLET FAMILY ADJUSTS TO LIFE KANSAS STYLE
January 5, 1992
“Life is full of adjustments,” says Jerel Hilding. “That’s what makes it fun.” Hilding, his wife, Krystyna Jurkowski Hilding, their son, Dennis, and Mrs. Hilding’s mother, Teresa Jurkowski, know quite a lot about adjustments most recently theirs to Kansas.