Advertisement

Archive for Thursday, March 11, 2004

All stories

KU police release sketch of library arson suspect
March 11, 2004
(Updated Wednesday at 11:46 a.m.) The Kansas University Public Safety Office has released a composite sketch of a man believed to be near a fire set Monday in Watson Library.
Sheriff won’t seek second term
March 11, 2004
(Updated Thursday at 11:28 a.m.) Douglas County Sheriff Rick Trapp has decided not to run for a second, four-year term. Trapp, a Republican, was elected in 2000, succeeding Loren Anderson.
Briefly
March 11, 2004
¢ Repossession effort leads to shooting, arrest ¢ Missing 78-year-old found safe, stuck ¢ KU installs spam filter ¢ Unclassified KU professionals make case
Briefly
March 11, 2004
¢ Runaway locomotive crushes five vehicles ¢ ImClone sues founder for unpaid tax bill ¢ Three students raped near Rutgers University ¢ Student kills herself in plunge from high-rise
Briefly
March 11, 2004
¢ Ex-professor sentenced in plague-scare case ¢ Celebrities announce liberal radio network ¢ Study shows diet can lower gout risk ¢ Assisted suicide rises slightly under new law
Babies and begonias: What can you expect of a kid in the garden?
March 11, 2004
It’s never too soon to introduce kids to gardens, as long as you have a reasonable expectation of what they can do.
Add a little inspiration to your backyard garden
March 11, 2004
Does your backyard lawn make you yawn? Is your patio slab way too drab? If you long for the romance of the French countryside or the serenity of a Zen garden, it only takes a little imagination and planning to transform your own backyard into the theme of your dreams.
Great gardening Web sites for kids
March 11, 2004
Check out these Web sites for inspiration, projects and tools designed for the younger gardener.
Get out and play: Gardening for the kid in you
March 11, 2004
It’s official: Gardening is good for the soul. According to researchers at Virginia Tech’s horticulture department, gardening improves confidence and self-esteem, promotes interest and enthusiasm for the future, increases powers of observation and even stimulates sensory perceptions and awakens curiosity.
Queen Mary 2 Rose to set sail next spring
March 11, 2004
Starting next spring, gardens may take on a look of royalty with a new rose — the Queen Mary 2.
Silly business
March 11, 2004
Hurtful ban
March 11, 2004
Not inappropriate
March 11, 2004
Outlaw divorce
March 11, 2004
Behavior is key
March 11, 2004
Internet providers sue hundreds over spam
March 11, 2004
Some of the nation’s largest Internet providers, in an unusual joint effort, said Wednesday they filed six lawsuits against hundreds of people who were accused of sending millions of unwanted e-mails in violation of the new U.S. law against spam.
Meat processor to expand
Eudora company plans to sell sausage products in area stores
March 11, 2004
A longtime Eudora meat processing company is expanding to push its locally popular sausage products into the meat cases of about 45 area grocers. Pyle Meat Co., whose Polish, hot Polish, Cajun and smoked sausages have long been staples at area events and on family tables, is planning a $120,000 expansion of its plant to boost production.
Stewart fans still buying her brand
Stores say sales steady despite guilty verdict
March 11, 2004
The preliminary verdict is in from Martha Stewart’s customers, and the convicted queen of home furnishings should like it much better than the one delivered in a New York courtroom last week. Many fans forgive her and, better yet, they seem to still be buying her products.
Aquila reduces losses to $34 million
March 11, 2004
Aquila Inc. narrowed its losses in the fourth quarter to $34 million amid an ongoing restructuring aimed at refocusing the company on its utility operations.
Selig pondering benefits for Negro League players
March 11, 2004
Bonds hurts back in practice
Mets outfielders won’t face charges in battery case
March 11, 2004
Barry Bonds injured his back on a batting-practice swing Wednesday and missed the San Francisco Giants’ game against the Texas Rangers.
Girlfriend’s son charged in shooting
March 11, 2004
The eldest son of a woman whose boyfriend was found dead in the couple’s house has been charged with murder.
Resumption of beef exports won’t restore jobs, Wichita company says
March 11, 2004
Mexico’s reopening of its borders last week to some U.S. beef products is good news, but it will not restore jobs lost at American beef processing plants, officials with Excel Corp. said Wednesday.
Expert: Popcorn plant must warn workers
March 11, 2004
Managers at a popcorn plant in Jasper were responsible for warning workers about any hazards associated with the use of butter flavoring, an industrial hygienist told jurors.
Missing FBI documents could derail Nichols case
March 11, 2004
Terry Nichols’ attorneys say more than a dozen FBI documents that raise the possibility of additional accomplices in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing weren’t turned over by state prosecutors or the federal government for Nichols’ murder trial defense.
Claim of lying raised in Nichols jury selection
March 11, 2004
The eighth day of jury selection in Terry Nichols’ state murder trial began Wednesday amid revelations that some prospective jurors said they would lie to be selected to possibly convict and sentence the bombing conspirator.
Royals top White Sox, 9-6
Outfielder’s five RBI not enough for Chicago
March 11, 2004
Aaron Rowland drove in five runs for a Chicago White Sox split squad Wednesday in a 9-6 loss to the Kansas City Royals.
Drive-by porn’ an eye-opener
In-car DVD players expose passers-by to X-rated images
March 11, 2004
Andrea Carlton hadn’t planned on telling her daughter about the birds and bees until she was 8 or 9. But that changed the night 4-year-old Catherine spotted a porno movie flickering on a screen in a minivan nearby.
Robotic leg braces may produce army of super troopers
March 11, 2004
Move over Bionic Man and make room for BLEEX — the Berkeley Lower Extremities Exoskeleton, with strap-on robotic legs designed to turn an ordinary human into a super strider.
Chicago fire department slurs spark controversy
March 11, 2004
A string of racial slurs broadcast over Chicago’s fire department radios has City Hall in an uproar, and the mayor is calling on firefighters to break their silence and identify the culprits.
Rusedski cleared in steroid case
Brit eighth ATP player exonerated following positive drug test
March 11, 2004
Greg Rusedski was cleared by an anti-doping panel Wednesday, the eighth player to fail a drug test yet be exonerated because he took supplements supplied by ATP trainers.
Track dominance
For some teams, success is a given on certain raceways
March 11, 2004
If the same cars used the same setups and raced on the same tires under the same rules every year, then it’d be far easier to understand how one driver or one team finds a way to dominate at a particular track in the NASCAR Nextel Cup Series.
Boeing ‘confident’ about landing 7E7 customer
Executive says company discussing new fuel-efficient jet with 50 airlines
March 11, 2004
Boeing Co. is “extremely confident” it will land one or more initial customers for its planned new 7E7 Dreamliner airplane this year, a top Boeing executive said Wednesday.
Wichita workers urged to reject contract offer
March 11, 2004
Calling Boeing Co.’s final offer an “insult” to employees, the union representing technical and professional workers at the company’s Wichita plant has recommended its members reject the contract.
Stocks fall as investors become defensive
March 11, 2004
Stocks tumbled Wednesday for the third straight session as investors, increasingly adopting a defensive strategy, bailed out of technology and other higher-risk shares. The Dow Jones industrial average shed 160 points and other major indexes also dropped sharply.
Report: Grand jury convened in Jackson case
March 11, 2004
The district attorney who charged Michael Jackson with child molestation is convening a grand jury to hear evidence in the case, a move apparently designed to sidestep a public preliminary hearing, a newspaper reported Wednesday.
Jackson leads CMA nominees
March 11, 2004
Alan Jackson, who received a leading eight Academy of Country Music nominations Wednesday, can justify celebrating as early as he wants because — as the title of his hit song suggests — “It’s Five O’Clock Somewhere.”
Reality shows’ resemblance is intentional
March 11, 2004
Producer Rob Burnett continues to dominate Thursdays with his twin creations “Survivor: All-Stars” (7 p.m., CBS) and “The Apprentice” (8 p.m., NBC). In addition to their shared paternity, these reality shows have been following similar story lines. Did you notice that the same week Nick and Amy teamed up on “The Apprentice,” Amber and Boston Rob were seen canoodling under the palm fronds on “Survivor”? And last week, both shows lost strong-willed (and unpopular) female contestants. Sue’s emotional exit inspired Tom to do a little jig. And if the coming attractions are to be believed, Omarosa’s demise will be an occasion for some of The Donald’s hopefuls to break out the bubbly. Coincidence? I think not.
House wants libraries to filter Internet porn
March 11, 2004
Public libraries would have to install technology to shield minors from Internet pornography and could not let them borrow R-rated videos under a bill given tentative House approval Wednesday. The proposed “Children’s Internet Protection Act,” advanced to final action on a 93-27 vote, would require the state to pay for the computer software before the filtering requirements would take effect.
N.J. town votes to stop taking gay marriage license applications
March 11, 2004
Bowing to pressure from the state attorney general, the city on Wednesday stopped accepting marriage license applications from gay couples but decided to seek a court ruling in support of same-sex vows.
Haskell softball fizzles in home-opening twinbill
March 11, 2004
Haskell Indian Nations University softball coach Gary Tanner had all his starters in Wednesday’s lineup.
Demand for cadaver tissue fuels illegal activity
March 11, 2004
Collagen to plump up starlets’ lips. New knees to enable weekend athletes to play basketball again. Skin for burn victims. Cadavers for surgeons to practice on.
KU Med Center’s protocol prohibits sale of body parts
March 11, 2004
The black market for body parts is a subject Dale Abrahamson hasn’t had to deal with in his five-plus years as the main cadaver contact for Kansas University Medical Center.
States tally $29 billion in unfunded mandates
March 11, 2004
It’s an old gripe, but one with an increasingly large price tag: States say they’re now paying at least $29 billion for programs that Washington launched but did not fully fund — including education, prescription drugs, homeland security and more.
Lucas, Allen tapped best of Big 12
March 11, 2004
The Big 12 Conference coaches are in disagreement with the writers on player of the year in the league. Wednesday, the coaches named Oklahoma State shooting guard Tony Allen player of the year in the league, while the Associated Press panel of writers went with Cowboy point guard John Lucas.
Jayhawks rock Tabor
KU empties bench during 15-1 victory
March 11, 2004
Kansas University baseball coach Ritch Price was happy his team finally played a midweek game Wednesday afternoon, but he had a few other things to smile about after a 15-1 thrashing of Tabor at Hoglund Ballpark. Price had scheduled a “staff day” for his pitching rotation, letting seven pitchers see action in one- or two-inning intervals.
Time of KU spring game pushed back to 3 p.m. April 18
March 11, 2004
Kansas University football coach Mark Mangino announced Wednesday that the Jayhawks’ spring scrimmage would be played at 3 p.m. April 18 at Memorial Stadium.
Prosecutors appeal ruling in Bryant case
March 11, 2004
Prosecutors have taken the Kobe Bryant case to the Colorado Supreme Court, saying the judge should not have granted a hearing on the sexual history of the woman accusing the NBA star of rape.
Visitor to Cuba will pay fine
Lawrence resident says travel penalty not worth challenging
March 11, 2004
Bob Augelli said he would like to fight the federal government, but it’s safer not to. The Lawrence man who faced a $37,000 federal fine for violating the U.S. government’s travel ban to Cuba said Wednesday he would settle the case for a $2,500 fine rather than challenge the allegations before an administrative law judge.
As state loses children, federal funding at risk
Census estimates loss of 19,000 from 2000-2003
March 11, 2004
Children are disappearing from Kansas. On that much, everybody seems to agree. How fast their numbers are diminishing, however, is the subject of a dispute that could determine the future of federal education funding in Kansas.
KU prof asked to translate Aristide’s statement
Resignation letter written in Haitian Creole
March 11, 2004
The director of the Kansas University Institute of Haitian Studies was called upon Monday by the U.S. Department of State to translate the controversial resignation letter of former Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. KU’s Bryant Freeman, a specialist in the Haitian Creole language, said Aristide’s letter never said, “I am resigning.”
250 turn out to honor KU’s ‘singing chancellor’
March 11, 2004
It’s been nearly 35 years since W. Clarke Wescoe was chancellor of Kansas University. That didn’t stop 250 people from attending a memorial service Wednesday to remember Wescoe, who died at age 83 on Feb. 29 in Kansas City, Kan. The crowd heartened Wescoe’s son David.
Kerry courts rivals’ favor
March 11, 2004
Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry on Wednesday called for deeper tax cuts for the middle class than proposed by President Bush and described his Republican critics as “the most crooked … lying group I’ve ever seen.”
Ads from ‘independent groups’ raise concerns
March 11, 2004
One year ago, when President Bush was up in the polls and his critics were down in the dumps, Washington strategist Jenny Backus said that her fellow Democrats badly needed to build “an amen choir,” a national network of activists who would sing the party tune at fever pitch, 24/7.
KU graduate sees bridge to future in foreign relations
March 11, 2004
It’s all about building bridges that, when finished, look the same from both sides of the river.
Panel endorses measure to make harming ‘unborn child’ a crime
March 11, 2004
People could be prosecuted for attacking, injuring or killing a fetus under a bill endorsed Wednesday by the House Federal and State Affairs Committee.
State’s number of seniors also falls
March 11, 2004
Kansas was one of only six states and the District of Columbia to report a decrease in the number of residents 65 and older.
Local satellite dish installer sees little impact from channel dispute
March 11, 2004
A battle between the parent company of the DISH Network and Viacom hasn’t hurt a Lawrence-based company that installs the satellite systems across the Midwest.
Clark R. Bittenbender
March 11, 2004
Nancy A. Lounsbury
March 11, 2004
Charles Brice Easum
March 11, 2004
No complaints
March 11, 2004
James W. McFarland
March 11, 2004
Breast cancer drug shows promise, study finds
Medicine touted as better than tamoxifen
March 11, 2004
Tamoxifen, the celebrated drug credited with slashing breast cancer death rates worldwide, could be eclipsed by a newer medicine that is even more effective at preventing a recurrence of the disease in women whose tumors were caught early and removed.
On the record
March 11, 2004
Stocks drop on fears of terrorism
Dow plummets nearly 170 points
March 11, 2004
Edgy investors sent stocks skidding Thursday as a string of bombings in Madrid overshadowed mostly good economic news and bullish forecasts from several companies. The Dow Jones industrial average nosedived nearly 170 points, giving the blue chips their biggest four-day drop in nearly 18 months.
NHL penalizes Bertuzzi
Vancouver forward suspended for season
March 11, 2004
Todd Bertuzzi is done for the season, suspended Thursday by an NHL intent on sending the message that it won’t tolerate premeditated attacks on the ice.
U.S. water use holding steady
Data show conservation works, researchers say
March 11, 2004
America’s water use has been stable since the mid-1980s despite population growth, a sign that conservation works, researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey said Thursday.
Highlights from the Kansas Legislature
March 11, 2004
Highlights of Wednesday’s activities at the Kansas Legislature.
Despite warnings, Iran plans to resume nuclear program
March 11, 2004
Iran said Wednesday it would resume uranium enrichment and warned it might quit cooperating with the International Atomic Energy Agency, which it accused of kowtowing to Washington at a crucial meeting in Vienna, Austria.
Purple martin passion reawakens
March 11, 2004
Flagging a winner
March 11, 2004
Westar stockholders seek to keep lawsuit alive
March 11, 2004
Attorneys representing stockholders who allege they were defrauded by former Westar Energy Inc. management will file legal briefs Monday hoping to keep the case going.
School funding plan taking shape, despite bill’s collapse
March 11, 2004
Legislation that combined a pledge of more state aid for schools with a huge tax break for married couples sank Wednesday in the House, but key elements of a possible school finance plan began to emerge.
Daily ticker
March 11, 2004
Kidnap flap
March 11, 2004
Aristide’s claim he was “kidnapped” reiterates the ever-present eagerness to blame America. As usual, something happens in another country and it’s merely routine to blame the United States.
Traditional vegetables are low-risk, high enjoyment
March 11, 2004
Traditional and non-traditional vegetables are easy to grow, low-maintenance and will add nutritious flavors to your favorite recipes. Fortunately for those who enjoy potted veggies, in recent years, seed hybridizers have introduced a wide variety of seeds specifically for potted plants.
Mail-order gardening: How-to for the virtual shopper
March 11, 2004
While local nurseries and home-and-garden centers will never lose their appeal as popular places for gardeners to purchase seeds, bulbs, shrubs and garden tools, many would argue that garden catalogs and Internet sites are must-haves for today’s gardener.
Achoo! But you knew: Allergy season near
March 11, 2004
If it’s spring, millions know one thing for sure: It’s time for spring allergies. Runny noses, sniffles, watery eyes, headaches and congestion are the result of allergens found in pollens or molds.
U.S. House passes bill prohibiting lawsuits against fast-food outlets
March 11, 2004
Americans who order fast food would have to hold the lawsuits under a bill passed by the House Wednesday.
Senate Democratic leader takes part in online chat
March 11, 2004
Kansas Senate Minority Leader Anthony Hensley took part in an online chat about legislative issues Thursday afternoon, touching on such issues as school finance, the gay marriage ban amendment and this weekend’s Democratic Party state caucuses.
Sooners largely unfamiliar with NCAA bubble
March 11, 2004
The Oklahoma Sooners have more on their minds than just trying to extend their winning streak in the Big 12 Conference tournament. This time, they’re still trying to ensure an NCAA berth.
Best Buys
March 11, 2004
The biggest advantage of mail-order plants and seeds, says horticulturist Maureen Gilmer, host of “Weekend Gardening” on DIY-Do It Yourself Network, is the selection.
Flowering shrubs hail spring’s arrival
March 11, 2004
Flowering shrubs are among the earliest and most vivid signs of spring. But just because their timing is predictable doesn’t mean their appearance has to be. Several new varieties of spring shrubs are giving old favorites a new look.
Briefly
March 11, 2004
¢ Dalai Lama hopes China relations thaw ¢ Israelis, Palestinians set date for summit ¢ Former Guantanamo detainees released ¢ Government promises talks with creditors
Briefly
March 11, 2004
¢ Committee supports fees for wireless E911 service ¢ Gunshot investigation leads to drug arrest ¢ Political veteran to begin blog at ljworld.com ¢ Pump Patrol seeks deals
9-11 ad recalls Bush’s ‘finest hour’
March 11, 2004
It’s no mystery why President Bush and his campaign aides have fought so hard to establish the legitimacy of their TV ad that includes scenes from the 9-11 attack on the World Trade Center. When the commercial came under criticism from survivors of some of those killed by the terrorists and also from some members of the firefighters’ union, Republicans rushed to insist that the visual references were well-justified by the significance of that day for the country — and for the Bush presidency.
Trade deficit hits monthly high
$43 billion imbalance key topic in political campaigns
March 11, 2004
America’s trade deficit hit a monthly high in January, the start of an election year in which Democrats hope to use the swollen trade gap and the loss of U.S. jobs as campaign issues against President Bush.
Padgett popular after hitting game-winner
March 11, 2004
David Padgett has been big man on campus this week — and not just because he stands 6-foot-11. Kansas University’s 235-pound freshman power forward from Reno, Nev., has received a hero’s treatment from his classmates after sinking a game-winning shot against Missouri on Sunday in Columbia, Mo.
Lawmakers say Pentagon hedging on cost of war
March 11, 2004
Pressed to estimate the cost of future operations in Iraq, the Pentagon has repeatedly said it’s just too hard to do.
Plant bulbs and light up your spring
March 11, 2004
With spring around the corner, start thinking of planting spring bulbs.
How to spot a neglected plant
March 11, 2004
Like any good parent, a good gardener spends considerable time ensuring that a budding bulb or blossom is tended with the utmost care.
K-State too fast, furious for Mizzou
March 11, 2004
Kansas State left Missouri way behind in the Big 12 Conference tournament.
Our town sports
March 11, 2004
Briefly
March 11, 2004
¢ Teen sniper Lee Boyd Malvo sentenced to life in prison ¢ Report: Scores of journalists jailed; China biggest offender ¢ Police corruption case widens to include more money, drugs
Gardening with kids: Playing in the dirt cultivates creativity
March 11, 2004
Looking for an inexpensive activity for you and your child that doesn’t involve carpooling? Look no farther than your backyard.
Mail-order sites on the Web
March 11, 2004
Mail-order sites on the Web
Focus on the big picture
March 11, 2004
The American and British governments are planning a joint training exercise to respond to a major, coordinated terrorist attack on both countries. “This will not be a desktop exercise,” says Britain’s Home Secretary David Blunkett, “but an actual test of our readiness to deal with a joint attack.”
Briefcase
March 11, 2004
¢ Krispy Kreme profits up ¢ Toyota agrees to share technology with Ford ¢ Former Bell firms, rivals urged to negotiate fees ¢ Beef, poultry exports fall
Lawmakers demand stringent drug testing
March 11, 2004
Sen. John McCain told the baseball players’ association Wednesday that Congress will step in unless the union agrees to toughen the sport’s steroid-testing rules.
Zimbabwe threatens death penalty for passengers aboard seized plane
March 11, 2004
The 64 suspected mercenaries who were aboard a cargo jet seized at the country’s main airport could face the death penalty, Zimbabwe’s foreign minister said Wednesday.
Volunteers eager to clean up area at historic school
March 11, 2004
After a local newspaper ran a story about run-down houses around a newly renovated civil rights landmark, the city office charged with sprucing up the area has been deluged with calls from volunteers eager to help.
Universities try to stop bill opening pay records
Behind-the-scenes effort aims to stop legislation in Senate committee
March 11, 2004
Higher-education officials are trying to kill an open-records bill because they don’t like a part of the proposed legislation that would make public the total compensation package of high-paid state employees, a Kansas legislator said Wednesday. Rep. Jene Vickrey, R-Louisburg, said he was surprised by the position because no one from the state’s major universities had testified on the open-records bill during committee action.
Sun sets on Bazaar cowboy
March 11, 2004
Frank Gaddie looked overdressed in his casket. He was wearing a dark suit with his hands folded just so below a wide, blue and white necktie. The funeral home had done a good job making the 94-year-old horse trader look “natural,” but it’s doubtful Gaddie would’ve appreciated the powder and the makeup, or, for that matter, the suit.
Sixers’ Robinson to have elbow surgery
March 11, 2004
Philadelphia 76ers forward Glenn Robinson will undergo surgery Tuesday to repair bone chips in his right elbow.
Bush defends economic plan
March 11, 2004
President Bush on Wednesday vigorously defended his economic and trade policies, crediting them with lifting America from the throes of recession into “the fastest-growing major industrialized economy in the world.”
Kindergarten prep set to begin
Roundups introduce children, their parents to new schools
March 11, 2004
David Williams says he loves it each spring when a new cadre of kindergartners enlists at Prairie Park School.
CBS, EchoStar reach agreement on fees
March 11, 2004
Ending a fee dispute that left millions of DISH satellite television customers without several popular channels, EchoStar Communications Corp. agreed early today on a new contract with CBS parent Viacom Inc.
Tejada ‘fine’ after straining leg muscle
March 11, 2004
Baltimore Orioles shortstop Miguel Tejada left Thursday’s game against Boston because of a strained lower right leg muscle.
McGrady pours in 62
T-Mac sets Magic record in win over Wizards
March 11, 2004
Tracy McGrady had a record-setting night that felt strangely empty.
Soldier pays homage to seniors who supported him
March 11, 2004
A decorated soldier extended words of thanks Wednesday to Lawrence senior citizens who sent supplies and offered encouragement to him last year while he was in Iraq.
Poll finds growing support for same-sex civil unions
March 11, 2004
Public support appears to be growing for legalizing civil unions for same-sex couples, as well as for allowing states to make their own laws regulating homosexual marriage, according to the latest Washington Post-ABC News poll.
People
March 11, 2004
¢ Sorvino starts anti-violence drive ¢ Filmmakers seek dog thespians ¢ Couple hope to limit separations ¢ Ross ordered back to jail
Americans not easily shocked
March 11, 2004
Most people I know would have put up money against anyone betting that Martha Stewart would go down on all four counts against her. They were, as insider cynics themselves, sure that a woman of her wealth and power could not be stripped of her force by a bunch of peasants. Besides, she had eight women on the jury, and you know how they are.
Palestinian group says U.S. assassinated militant
March 11, 2004
A Palestinian guerrilla group accused the United States on Wednesday of assassinating its leader Abul Abbas, and a U.S. Pentagon official said the United States believed he died of a heart attack.
Haiti’s new prime minister ready to build new government
March 11, 2004
Gerard Latortue, a former U.N. official chosen to lead Haiti out of political turmoil, returned Wednesday from the United States to begin the arduous task of building a government. Loyalists of the former president said they wouldn’t accept him.
Streets rejoins Mariucci with Lions
March 11, 2004
Wide receiver Tai Streets signed with Detroit on Wednesday and reunited with Steve Mariucci, his coach when he began his career in San Francisco.
Watkins resigns at Texas A&M
March 11, 2004
Texas A&M coach Melvin Watkins said Wednesday he was resigning after this season, ending a six-year tenure that bottomed out with an 0-16 conference record this season. The announcement came on the eve of the Big 12 Conference tournament. He said he wanted it out now instead of after the Aggies finish the season to avoid speculation distracting the team.
Corrections
March 11, 2004
IMAX film gives viewers seldom-seen perspective
March 11, 2004
NASCAR, Warner Brothers and IMAX could spend a lot of money on a marketing campaign for the new movie “NASCAR: The IMAX Experience.”
Woodling: Three teams from Big 12 could land top-4 seeds
March 11, 2004
Clattering merrily on the keyboard while wondering if Kansas University and Bill Self will wind up in the same NCAA Tournament bracket with Illinois or North Carolina, or both. … If you believe in the RPIs — and the NCAA relies heavily on its own undivulged Rating Percentage Index — then the difference among the top three teams in the Big 12 Conference is minimal.
Put some zing into your foundation plants
March 11, 2004
Boring. This is how Paul James describes typical foundation plantings, or shrubs, trees and flowers planted near the foundation of a house. He said people should “break from tradition” and throw some different shrubs and trees into the mix.
Horoscopes
March 11, 2004