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Archive for Sunday, April 11, 2004

All stories

People
April 11, 2004
¢ Schwarzenegger saves swimmer ¢ Hometown honors its King ¢ Security stop miffs Spanish prince ¢ Victoria’s Secret drops TV show
Briefs
April 11, 2004
¢ KU journalism student wins Hearst award ¢ Ozawkie representative files for re-election ¢ Governor to speak at KU Med Center ¢ Gasoline Prices: Pump Patrol seeks deals
U.S. backs from vow to capture bin Laden this year
April 11, 2004
The U.S. military pulled back Saturday from an earlier prediction that Osama bin Laden would be captured this year, even while preparing its largest force to date for operations along the Pakistani border where the al-Qaida chief is suspected to be hiding.
Rollin’ Reds win fourth straight
Jimenez provides heroics for Cincinnati, off to best start since 1994
April 11, 2004
It has been 10 years since the Cincinnati Reds started so well. D’Angelo Jimenez drove in a pair of runs and made a saving defensive play Saturday, setting up a 3-1 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates — the latest win during Cincinnati’s uplifting homestand.
Fashion briefs
April 11, 2004
¢ Global T-shirt auction ¢ Spring cleaning ¢ Fashion Barbies
Gay issues in limelight as Pride Week begins
April 11, 2004
A lot has changed since last year’s Gay Pride Week. Gay marriage has become a front-burner issue. “Queer Eye for the Straight Guy” is one of the hottest shows on television. And in Lawrence, gays and lesbians are beginning to organize outside the university.
Movie becomes sensation in Holy Land
April 11, 2004
Mel Gibson’s controversial film “The Passion of the Christ” has been box-office boffo worldwide. But in the Holy Land, where the biblical epic is set — and where no distributor has picked it up for theatrical release — it has become an underground sensation.
Companies profit from storing cord blood
Doctors raise concerns about marketing tactics
April 11, 2004
When Marla Dalton was expecting, she read the pregnancy magazines, picked up pamphlets at her doctor’s office and logged on to mom-centric Web sites and chat rooms. In the process, she was inundated by marketing imploring her to privately store her twins’ umbilical cord blood.
Mystery ‘Good Blood’ is in the right vein
April 11, 2004
The prologue of Aaron Elkins’ mystery, “Good Blood” (Berkley Prime Crime, $23.95), may remind readers of a plot suitable for the first scene of a Verdi opera. Then the book turns modern. All through, it sustains interest. It’s quite complicated, but has surprises all along.
A decade in the Lied
April 11, 2004
Jackie Davis remembers well the first performance at the Lied Center. It was Sept. 28, 1993, and “The Secret Garden” was touring the country after a bang-up opening on Broadway three years earlier.
World briefs
April 11, 2004
¢ Extremist members join mass jailbreak ¢ Explosion levels building near Texas border ¢ Palestinians donate to Hamas efforts ¢ Breakaway rebels prepare for attack
Vets join human disease battlefield
April 11, 2004
When medical detectives track the source of a new outbreak, increasingly they look no farther than the animal world. That’s because about 75 percent of all new infectious diseases — including high-profile ones like SARS, bird flu, monkeypox and West Nile virus — originate from animals.
Humphries signs agent
April 11, 2004
Baylor thumps Kansas
Bears roll to 7-0 victory over Jayhawks
April 11, 2004
After Saturday’s match against Baylor, Kansas University tennis coach Amy Hall said her team had been in peaks and valleys this season.
Last of unbeatens falls
Minnesota busts out bats, gives Detroit first loss
April 11, 2004
The Minnesota Twins have played enough games at Comerica Park to know just how tough it is to hit home runs there. So even they were surprised when they set a stadium record with six homers, including two by light-hitting catcher Henry Blanco, while handing the Detroit Tigers their first loss of the season, 10-5 Saturday.
Pet post
April 11, 2004
Renewed passion
Gibson film credited with filling churches this Easter
April 11, 2004
For Easter services today, the Rev. Rick Burwick is predicting his church will be full. And some credit for that goes to Mel Gibson. “In my opinion, ‘The Passion of the Christ’ movie prepared a lot of people’s hearts to know Christ as their savior,” said Burwick, pastor of Clinton Parkway Assembly of God, 3200 Clinton Parkway. “You can’t watch the movie without knowing Christ loved you.”
Bookstore
April 11, 2004
Passion’ sparks book sales
Lawrence retailers report rise in sales of religious items
April 11, 2004
Mel Gibson isn’t the only one making a mint off the movie “The Passion of the Christ.” So is the religious book publishing industry. Simple anticipation of the movie’s release early this year was enough to boost industry sales more than 50 percent in 2003, the biggest jump of any group in the publishing industry, according to the Association of American Publishers.
Herbal cleanses: Proponents and critics debate effectiveness
April 11, 2004
Less than a year ago, Stacy Boston-Svarczkopf ate fast foods and high-fat meals. She drank lots of coffee. She was plagued by rashes on her elbows and the back of her head.
Commentary: Security concerns vary for Americans traveling to Athens
April 11, 2004
Gus and Frances Trantham are going to the Olympics, which doesn’t make their children very happy. “They can’t understand why we’re going,” Gus Trantham said. “They have a very conservative attitude about this.” Not their parents. The Tranthams have traveled the world for business and pleasure. They’ve been to the heart of Africa and have crisscrossed Europe more times than they want to remember.
Taurasi’s whirlwind week ends at U.S. workout
April 11, 2004
Fewer than 48 hours after kicking a ball to the rafters to celebrate Connecticut’s 2004 NCAA women’s basketball title, star guard Diana Taurasi found herself in a different kind of stratosphere.
Riders criticize possible T route changes
April 11, 2004
Lawrence’s public buses should continue to make stops on the campus of Haskell Indian Nations University, several bus riders and others urged at a hearing Saturday. “It is exceedingly important for my students to use that route,” said Ann Foster, coordinator of a “bridge program” that connects Haskell students to research programs at Kansas University.
Waltrip avoids crash, earns victory
April 11, 2004
Michael Waltrip avoided a crash that took out the top four drivers with two laps to go and won the Pepsi 300 on Saturday at Nashville Superspeedway.
What’s with pro bent to hoops hall?
April 11, 2004
Any time a new sports hall of fame is started, there’s close scrutiny of the first group of inductees along with immediate reaction about which stars were not included. Often the most glaring omissions are corrected in a few years — as probably will be the case with the new Kansas Relays Hall of Fame.
Briefs
April 11, 2004
How to invest wisely without owning stocks
April 11, 2004
Since I go on about the stock market so often, it seems only fair to disclose my own stock holdings every once in a while. So here’s the list.
Outbreak hurts geranium industry
April 11, 2004
The dirt on geraniums has nothing to do with their everlasting popularity, their bright and cheery blooms, or their fancy and fussy leaves. Those geraniums that are ubiquitous in window boxes throughout the summer months are exceedingly disease-prone and require a lot of special care in production.
Show to feature landscape designer
April 11, 2004
Boy bands battle back for fans, respect
April 11, 2004
There are those who say the golden era of boy bands is over, swept away by a flood of lawsuits, solo ambitions and changing teen tastes.
U.S. asks Iraqi insurgents to join cease-fire in Fallujah
April 11, 2004
Insurgents and U.S.-allied Iraqi officials agreed in principle for a cease-fire in Fallujah starting today, but the deal depends on the doubtful prospect of American soldiers withdrawing from the city, a member of Iraq’s Governing Council said.
On the record
April 11, 2004
Natural remedies save pet owners money
April 11, 2004
The Motley Fool
April 11, 2004
¢ Name That Company ¢ Index fund ¢ Issuing more stock
Motherhood author Rachel Cusk proves to be a modern great
April 11, 2004
When I was in elementary school I had a friend named Danny Plaugens. Danny was a nice enough kid, but eventually I had to cut the friendship short because of his overbearing mother.
Poet’s showcase
April 11, 2004
Arts notes
April 11, 2004
¢ Marion Palfi photographs document discrimination ¢ KU alum, arts advocate to speak at university ¢ Lawrence ArtWalk calls for artists ¢ KU faculty, students perform in Guatemala ¢ KU vocal student heads to regional competition ¢ April foolishness abounds in ‘Right Between the Ears’ ¢ Baldwin student’s story wins first place ¢ Creative clicking
First reader would have shared Pulitzer pride
April 11, 2004
My first reader was a welfare mother with a heart condition. She lived in a housing project near downtown Los Angeles. This is circa 1962 or ‘63 and technically, she wasn’t my reader back then but my listener.
Spread it around
The story of a tiny neighborhood swimming pool may offer a lesson for those who do the planning for various public facilities in Lawrence.
April 11, 2004
Realtors always say that the three biggest factors in the value of a house are location, location and location. The same dictum applies to many businesses and attractions, including recreation facilities, as illustrated by neighborhood concern over an East Lawrence swimming pool that has fallen into disrepair and may be forced to close.
Election delay may inflame Iraqi Shiites
April 11, 2004
The White House could soon confront a Shiite uprising that extends far beyond the forces of the radical cleric, Muqtada al-Sadr. That is a much greater threat than the battles now being fought in Fallujah with minority Sunni insurgents.
Free country
April 11, 2004
Smoking ban
April 11, 2004
Donation care
April 11, 2004
Bad jokes
April 11, 2004
Party was no fairy-tale ending for Cinderella
April 11, 2004
Apparently I am the only journalist in America who is not afraid to speak out against birthday-party pinatas. Apparently all the other so-called “journalists” — and, yes, Mr. Bob Woodward, I am talking to you — are scared to take on the powerful international pinata industry.
Seniors calendar
April 11, 2004
Briefcase
April 11, 2004
¢ San Francisco No. 1 spot for wireless ‘Net service ¢ Forum to connect legislators, residents
KU track star to appear at bookstore with author
April 11, 2004
In 1954, a track athlete from small-town Kansas was competing with runners in England and Australia to be the first to break the four-minute mile.
What are you reading?
April 11, 2004
Family briefs
April 11, 2004
¢ C’mon get happy ¢ Airing out the house? Keep an eye on the kids ¢ ‘Finicky’ is no excuse
Alamo’s legends thrive
Movie-worthy Texas landmark blends myth, history
April 11, 2004
Wear the coonskin cap if you must, but you’ll have to take it off at the front door of the Alamo. And if you expect the ushers to bust a gut when you ask “Where’s the basement?” don’t be disappointed if Pee-wee Herman’s well-worn gag only gets you a polite but weary smile.
Travel briefs
April 11, 2004
¢ Statue of Liberty reopens after changes ¢ ‘Goodnight Moon’ illustrator in exhibit ¢ St. Louis hotels offer summer packages
Spiritual health
Medical experts explore religion’s
April 11, 2004
Dr. Harvey Elder and a colleague at Loma Linda University Medical Center in Loma Linda, Calif., were puzzled. They could find no medical reason for a 37-year-old woman to have asthma so severe that she had suffered two heart attacks.
Wake up your skin
Cosmetic containing coffee extract purports to eliminate blotches
April 11, 2004
That morning cup o’ Joe may have more to offer than a caffeine pick-me-up. It could be the ticket to smoother, clearer skin. Or so Art Watkins suspects. Watkins knows a thing or two about coffee. He’s been running Tradewinds Coffee Co. in Raleigh, N.C., since 1987.
Antique screens surface at shows, auctions
April 11, 2004
Screens made to protect people from drafts, the heat of a fire or observation by others are occasionally seen at shows and auctions.
Commentary: Saved objects are records of our lives
April 11, 2004
The first thing was my 86-year-old mother falling off the neighbor’s porch. Backward. At least nothing broke. A few months later she stumbled leaving the bathroom and cracked a kneecap. At least she didn’t need surgery. But the calls are getting awfully close.
Perennial beauty
Colorful clematis popular because of its versatility
April 11, 2004
Ask a friend to name a favorite flower or vegetable and chances are, you’ll hear of tomatoes, impatiens, marigolds, peppers, geraniums, corn or any one of the dozens of annual plants Americans grow in their summer garden.
Dance revolves around massive dream catcher
Lied Center co-commissioned piece Diavolo Dance Theatre will perform Friday evening
April 11, 2004
American Indians make fun of people who hang dream catchers from their rearview mirrors. After all, legend tells us the hole in the center of a dream catcher web allows good dreams to pass through to sleepers, while the web itself traps bad dreams until they disappear at sunrise.
Herbicides necessary for weeds
April 11, 2004
Nothing is more exciting than planting a spring vegetable garden; nothing is more disappointing than having it overrun by weeds.
Garden briefs
April 11, 2004
¢ Workshop scheduled for herb gardens ¢ Violet show, sale set for April 23-25
Museum of Modern Art plans November return to Manhattan
April 11, 2004
The newly renovated and hugely expanded Museum of Modern Art will reopen its Manhattan doors to the public on Nov. 20, marking the end of an $858 million reconstruction project and commemorating its 75th anniversary.
Behind the lens
Thinking outside bar box leads to more original shot
April 11, 2004
When the Jayhawks enter the final legs of the NCAA tournament, we try to localize some of the stories.
Husband-wife poets pen verse to cope with horrors, profound dignity of death
April 11, 2004
Baldwin nurse Shannon Musgrave has held patients’ hands as they exhaled their final breath. Peaceful endings at home. Her husband, Vietnam veteran John Musgrave, has seen comrades mowed down by enemy fire and killed North Vietnamese soldiers before they could kill him.
Lied anniversary gala features Yo-Yo Ma, dinner and party
April 11, 2004
Don’t bother trying to get tickets to see Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble Saturday night at the Lied Center. Tickets have been sold out since January. The 8 p.m. performance is part of a special gala event in honor of the 10th anniversary of the Lied Center and the 100th anniversary of the Kansas University Concert Series.
Taiwanese protest ends with violence
April 11, 2004
Tossing bottles and rocks, hundreds of Taiwanese protesters were blasted by police water cannons Saturday after a rally demanding an independent investigation of the bizarre shooting that injured President Chen Shui-bian one day before his narrow re-election.
Faith flourishes after deadly week
April 11, 2004
Navy Capt. Bradley Sickler, the deputy chaplain for the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, sums up pretty easily the sentiments of hundreds of Marines and sailors based here after a week of some of the deadliest fighting since U.S. troops entered Iraq.
Easter vigil includes baptisms
April 11, 2004
Looking weak and speaking with great effort, Pope John Paul II blessed the flame of a tall candle at the start of a long Easter vigil service Saturday night in a packed St. Peter’s Basilica. The pontiff baptized people from Europe, Africa and Asia in a solemn, chant-filled ceremony.
President promises to maintain Iraq efforts
April 11, 2004
Declaring the “enemies of freedom will fail” in Iraq, President Bush vowed Saturday to press on there with a “multicity offensive” for weeks, if necessary, to restore order.
U.S. soldiers fight to subdue Shiites
1st Armored Division secures Kut, faces prolonged service in Iraq
April 11, 2004
One year after invading Iraq, U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Jorge Velez was meant to be heading home today from Baghdad. Instead, the platoon sergeant was smack in the center of this restive Shiite heartland Saturday, kicking in doors and staging raids as Killer Troop hunted down supporters of America’s newest Iraqi enemy, Muqtada al-Sadr.
Fleeting beach memorial tallies war’s permanent toll
April 11, 2004
Lane Anderson sees the ghosts of fallen troops he knew in Vietnam when he looks out at the sea of white crosses that cover the sandy shore near Stearns Wharf. The memorial, dubbed “Arlington West,” is made up of one small cross for each U.S. military death in Iraq, placed on the beach at sunrise and taken down at sunset every Sunday.
State briefs
April 11, 2004
¢ McConnell air base to get new commander ¢ Baker’s nursing school schedules open house
Krayzelburg battling injury for U.S. swim spot
April 11, 2004
Lenny Krayzelburg’s desire to return to the medal stand is the reason he still welcomes the early wake-up calls and grueling grind of a world-class swimmer. At 28, Krayzelburg is convinced he can reclaim his title as the world’s best backstroker before retiring — despite being beset by injuries since winning gold at the 2000 Summer Olympics.
Cotton continues its growth in Kansas
April 11, 2004
Cotton continues to make strides in Kansas, with production in 2004 expected to almost double that of 2003. Another 40 percent increase in production is projected for 2005, producers were told last week during the annual Cotton Summit at the Sedgwick County Extension Education Center.
Court of appeals reinstates confession in ‘68 Navy killing
April 11, 2004
A confession thrown out by a lower court can be used against a man accused of killing his Navy shipmate, a federal appellate court ruled. The ruling came Friday from the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals, which reversed the ruling of one of its own panels.
AARP criticizes nursing home inspection bill
Proposed legislation would limit use of records in lawsuits
April 11, 2004
A bill to ban some inspection records from being used in lawsuits against nursing homes has drawn strong opposition from AARP, which has spent thousands on newspaper ads opposing the measure. The seniors advocacy group says the bill would make it harder to sue a facility for neglect.
News shows
April 11, 2004
Education majors spend more time with hands-on teaching
April 11, 2004
Teacher-in-training Jennifer Arthur circulated among her first-graders one afternoon earlier this year as they worked in groups to solve a problem involving a fictitious Uncle Harvey and his sandwiches. Arthur had told the children Uncle Harvey had two kinds of bread, as well as peanut butter and cheese.
James A. Manley Sr.
April 11, 2004
Clara Mae Puckett
April 11, 2004
Area briefs
April 11, 2004
¢ Veritas school plans kindergarten roundup ¢ CASA fund-raiser puts playhouse up for grabs
Young chess players place at nationals
April 11, 2004
Young local chess teams demonstrated earlier this month that it’s never too early to start playing the game of wits. The Quail Run team, with members Jed Borovik, Alan Shi, Kellen Cross and Thomas Clark, took fifth place in the championship division, kindergarten through sixth grade, of the National Elementary Scholastic Chess Championships in Pittsburgh. The Wakarusa Valley team took 12th place in the event, which was April 2-4.
Texan finds art in amphibians
April 11, 2004
For Tracy Hicks, the 300,000 preserved amphibians at the Kansas University Natural History Museum are more than science; they’re art. For several years, Hicks has been traveling to the museum to make casts of toads and frogs he incorporates into his artwork, which has been exhibited at such museums as the Dallas Museum of Art.
KU golf settles for 2nd
April 11, 2004
Kansas University’s men’s golf team shot a combined 9-under par over the final three holes to salvage second place Saturday at the 15-team Intercollegiate at MacGregor Downs.
Lawrence 24-year-old relishes job in Iraq
Her Baghdad assignment holds danger aplenty, but ‘it’s all in a day’s work’
April 11, 2004
After graduating from college last spring, Lawrence native Casey Wasson thought she was going to spend a relaxing summer here and in Washington, D.C., searching for a nice, peaceful 9-to-5 government job. By October, Wasson, fresh out of Patrick Henry College in Virginia, found herself in Baghdad, working for the Office of Management and Budget with the U.S.-led Coalition Provisional Authority.
Declassified memo said al-Qaida was in U.S.
April 11, 2004
President Bush was told more than a month before the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks that al-Qaida had reached America’s shores, had a support system in place for its operatives and that the FBI had detected suspicious activity that might involve a hijacking plot.
Unsolved serial killings haunt Wichita
April 11, 2004
Jan. 15, 1974. It was the day that “Happy Days” premiered on ABC. “Smokin’ in the Boys Room” by Brownsville Station was the No. 1 hit in Wichita. And a panel of experts examining the Watergate tapes reported that an 18-minute gap was not caused by an accidental erasure.
KU’s Foster wins javelin
April 11, 2004
Kansas University’s Megan Foster won the javelin throw with a regional qualifying mark of 144-feet, 10-inches, and Kim Clark posted a regional qualifying time of 2:10.26 to place second in the 800 on Saturday at the John McDonnell Invitational.
Rescue efforts continue after 38 miners killed in Russian explosion
April 11, 2004
An explosion that rocked a Russian coal mine Saturday sealed a shaft with rubble and killed at least 38 workers. Rescuers were trying to free about eight others missing underground.
National briefs
April 11, 2004
¢ Poll: More in U.S. accept gays ¢ U.S. issues terror warning during religious holidays ¢ Children on Easter egg hunt find guns in schoolyard
FSHS girls win track meet
April 11, 2004
Free State High’s track and field team had a spectacular showing at the Blue Valley Relays on Saturday, with the girls winning the eight-team meet and the boys taking fourth.
Woods looks lost, falls to 20th
April 11, 2004
There were moments when Tiger Woods looked like he had never played at the Masters, let alone won it three times. Errant drives, off-target approaches and, most notably, a few unfathomable reads on the greens turned the third round at Augusta National into a mess for Woods.
Nelson named Wooden winner
Saint Joseph’s guard edges Okafor for honor
April 11, 2004
Saint Joseph’s guard Jameer Nelson has amassed quite a trophy collection. The season’s last major player-of-the-year award meant the most to him, though.
Prosecutors restate desire for speedy trial
April 11, 2004
Colorado district attorney Mark Hurlbert has filed a reply in court that restated the prosecution’s desire to speed up the Kobe Bryant sexual-assault case.
Mickelson in position to end major drought
Lefty’ tied with DiMarco for Masters lead heading into today’s final round
April 11, 2004
The stage is set once again for the great human tragedy that has been Phil Mickelson at the majors. Will the ending be any different this time?
Royals come through in clutch
April 11, 2004
Less than one week into the season, a pattern has emerged for Cleveland and Kansas City. The Indians blow late leads and lose in extra innings. The Royals pitch lousy but win on clutch hits.
Aggies slide past KU
April 11, 2004
Kansas University baseball senior Ryan Baty vowed the Jayhawks would respond with a valiant effort Saturday following their 10-run loss to Texas A&M on Friday night.
KU softball drops pair
April 11, 2004
Kansas University’s softball squad traveled here for a doubleheader against Texas A&M. The Jayhawks will travel home with two more losses.
Olson helps Kansas row past K-State
April 11, 2004
Beth Olson proved she was back Saturday, and so did her back. The Kansas University senior rower, who had surgery last season to repair a herniated disc in her back, again found success Saturday at the Kansas Cup.
Prep Hairston to visit OU; Miami to tap Texas aide
April 11, 2004
Malik Hairston, a 6-foot-5 high school senior guard from Detroit, will not make a decision on his future college this weekend.
Nader facing more obstacles this time
Former local supporters conflicted on 2004 vote
April 11, 2004
Marie Stockett wasn’t a big fan of politics until 2000, when Ralph Nader ran for president. The Lawrence woman was so inspired by Nader’s left-wing Green Party candidacy that she became an activist, joining the Kaw Valley Greens, then serving the party at the state and national levels.
Athletics’ Ellis to miss season
April 11, 2004
Oakland Athletics second baseman Mark Ellis will miss the entire season because of a right shoulder injury that requires surgery. Ellis, who has been rehabilitating in Phoenix, was in the Bay Area on Saturday to meet with team doctor Jerrald Goldman about the latest MRI on the shoulder. The test revealed a torn labrum, and Goldman will perform the operation. No date had been set.
Calendar
April 11, 2004
Lawrence briefs
April 11, 2004
¢ Fledgling Lions Club at KU seeks members ¢ Free State students’ artwork on exhibit
Elementary schools in need of ADA-approved upgrades
April 11, 2004
The Lawrence school board will discuss spending about $150,000 on improvements to bring six elementary schools up to standards set by the Americans with Disabilities Act.
Commentary: Giving pets as Easter gifts is bad idea
April 11, 2004
If all the sugar this time of year isn’t enough to send you into insulin shock, the cutesy characterizations of bunnies, ducklings and chicks just might.
Firebirds 3rd at swim meet
April 11, 2004
The Free State High girls swimming and diving team took third, and Lawrence High placed ninth out of 17 teams Saturday at the Olathe Invitational.
Kathleen Dodge Burton
April 11, 2004
Rose falls from lead after dreadful round of 81
April 11, 2004
Justin Rose managed a smile as he walked up to the 18th green, shrugging his shoulders helplessly at what certainly will go down as one of the most wretched days ever at the Masters. Woods, water, sand, rough — whatever trouble there is at Augusta National, Rose found it Saturday.
Field sifted on third day
Contenders take charge as pretenders fade away
April 11, 2004
Make way on the Masters leaderboard. Here come Paul Casey and Bernhard Langer — and they’re bringing Kirk Triplett and Fredrik Jacobson. Look out below. There go Justin Rose and Jose Maria Olazabal, with Alex Cejka and Charles Howell III right on their heels.
Lack of curiosity keeps Bush in the dark
April 11, 2004
In her testimony before the 9-11 commission on Thursday, national security adviser Condoleezza Rice gave glimpses of the inner workings of the Bush White House that were extraordinarily revealing for this highly secretive administration.
Slow start dooms LHS to 11-7 loss
April 11, 2004
The day started badly for Lawrence High’s baseball team because of cold temperatures and rain. It quickly worsened when the Lions spotted visiting Blue Valley North a nine-run lead Saturday. Lawrence rallied, but BVN held on for an 11-7 win at Ice Field.
Celtics’ playoff hopes on hold
Hawks prevent Boston from clinching berth
April 11, 2004
It’s all a matter of playing time for Bob Sura. Sura registered his second consecutive triple-double, and the Atlanta Hawks prevented the Boston Celtics from clinching a playoff spot with a 110-99 victory Saturday night.
Garnett easy MVP choice
April 11, 2004
I’m one of about 100 voters on the NBA’s annual awards for excellence over the course of an 82-game season that everyone will tell us means nothing when the playoffs start Saturday.
East Coast states unite to protect threatened bird
Commercial anglers object to limits
April 11, 2004
States from Maryland to New York have joined in an uncommon effort to help a struggling bird’s 8,000-mile migration from the tip of Argentina well into Canada. Every spring, the 5-ounce red knot travels from South America, feasting on horseshoe crab eggs in the Chesapeake Bay before taking on the last leg of the route through New Jersey and New York into Canada.
Commentary: Feeding snakes not for faint of heart
April 11, 2004
Mothers of boys learn early that the rhyme about frogs, snails and puppy-dog tails is not hyperbole. My sons made pets of all those critters and also threw snakes, mice, rats and turtles into the mix.
General store back in business
75-year-old restores building, renews rural resource
April 11, 2004
She had driven past the dilapidated building dozens of times, and always she wondered: Wouldn’t it be great if someone would save it? After all, it was once Buzby’s General Store, a 19th-century country business that served as feed store, grocery and candy shop for generations of folks before falling on hard times.