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Archive for Thursday, January 17, 2002

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Powell urges diplomatic solution for Pakistan, India
January 17, 2002
(Updated Thursday at 12:43 p.m.) Secretary of State Colin Powell said Thursday he believed tensions had eased considerably between nuclear-armed neighbors India and Pakistan and said Washington stood ready to help “its two friends.”
Afghan leader wants U.S. to make long-term commitment
January 17, 2002
(Updated Thursday at 6:24 a.m.) Prime Minister Hamid Karzai told U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell during a historic visit Thursday that Afghanistan needs a long-term commitment from the United States to become a normal country after years of being run by terrorists, and Powell promised that “we will be with you.”
Math - 6News video report: Math integrated throughout curriculum
January 17, 2002
Two Hillcrest teachers explain how teaching math is a collaborative process at Hillcrest School in Lawrence.
THE MAG: Film Review - ‘Black Hawk Down’
Black Hawk Down’ effectively recreates grim episode from America’s recent past
January 17, 2002
By Jon Niccum It’s October 1993, and the African nation of Somalia is plagued by famine and civil war. In one of numerous atrocities, a militia controlled by Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid fires into a starving crowd of civilians that is attempting to access a Red Cross food distribution center in Mogadishu.
THE MAG: Film Review - ‘Happy Accidents’
January 17, 2002
By Loey Lockerby Brad Anderson’s “Happy Accidents” is sort of a cinematic Frankenstein monster, pieced together from the remains of other movies. There’s a touch of “K-PAX, ” a bit of “Somewhere in Time,” a smidgen of “Memento,” and quite a lot of the classic short film “La Jet” Even with these derivative roots, however, “Happy Accidents” is told with enough cleverness to make it a diverting fantasy.
THE MAG: Film Review - ‘The Shipping News’
Kevin Spacey and cast add believability to the uneven drama ‘The Shipping News’
January 17, 2002
By Dan Lybarger With its sterling literary pedigree, picturesque setting, proven creative team and dream cast, “The Shipping News” ultimately ends up less than the sum of its parts. In adapting E. Annie Proulx’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, writer Robert Nelson Jacobs and director Lasse Hallstrthe team behind “Chocolat”) capture an intriguing folk-tale ambiance but have trouble making some of the exaggerated story consistently credible.
Sage advice
January 17, 2002
Roger Dale DeAtley
January 17, 2002
Planning dissent
January 17, 2002
To the editor: In Sunday’s article, “Planners’ acts draw criticism,” Planning Commission Chairman Ron Durflinger is quoted as saying, “The elected body still makes the policy. If they don’t like a recommendation we make, all they have to do is say no.” Unfortunately, this is not true in every instance, including the one this article was about.
Our town sports
January 17, 2002
Our town sports
January 17, 2002
Tulsa Time: Paul Heitzman of Eudora won the ages 70-74 division of the Resolution Run 5K on New Year’s day in Tulsa, Okla. Heitzman was clocked in 20:40.
Old home town - 25, 40, and 100 years ago today
January 17, 2002
Old home town - 25, 40, and 100 years ago today
January 17, 2002
IN 1977 The low natural gas pressure caused by the intense cold and the demand for gas caused a number of people to give their fireplaces extra-special use. Many said the forced experience had actually led to better family unity as they gathered around to keep warm and converse, taking time to stick together rather than fragment around their dwelling.
NFL Briefs
January 17, 2002
Giants’ Strahan named top defensive player Warner misses practice because of stomach flu Chargers’ GM plans to call Schottenheimer Chargers’ McNeil added to AFC Pro Bowl roster Tannenbaum interviewed for Bucs’ GM position Packer cornerback hurt in domestic disturbance Faulk, Jauron win Maxwell honors
NFL Briefs
January 17, 2002
Giants’ Strahan named top defensive player Warner misses practice because of stomach flu Chargers’ GM plans to call Schottenheimer Chargers’ McNeil added to AFC Pro Bowl roster Tannenbaum interviewed for Bucs’ GM position Packer cornerback hurt in domestic disturbance Faulk, Jauron win Maxwell honors
In The Halls
January 17, 2002
This week’s question: Asked at West Junior High School
In The Halls
January 17, 2002
Inloes services
January 17, 2002
Memorial services for Billie Darlene Inloes, 67, Lecompton, will be at 2 p.m. Friday at Warren-McElwain Mortuary. She was cremated. Mrs. Inloes died Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2002, at St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Topeka.
Guthrie services
January 17, 2002
Eleanore Schumacher
January 17, 2002
Hays Services for Eleanore Schumacher, 79, Hays, were Wednesday at St. Joseph Catholic Church, Hays. Burial was in St. Francis Cemetery, Munjor. Mrs. Schumacher died Monday, Jan. 14, 2002, at Hays Medical Center.
Briefs
January 17, 2002
LMH may add another physician in Eudora Hospital board considers creating wound-care program
Briefs
January 17, 2002
LMH may add another physician in Eudora Hospital board considers creating wound-care program
Baseball Briefs
January 17, 2002
Royals sign Rosado for $3.25 million Mariners sign Boone to three-year deal Oakland signs Dye for $32 million Angels agree to terms with outfielder Erstad Red Sox, Mirabelli agree on contract Twins’ Mays signs $20 million contract Pitcher Service signs pact with Pirates Pitcher Astacio signs with Mets Cardinals, Drew agree on one-year contract Catcher Servais signs Giants minor-league pact Cubs invite Benes to spring training Brewers add Young
Area Briefs
January 17, 2002
Deliberations continue in DeSoto murder trial Sentencing hearing continued in minister’s sex-crimes case Ottawa narrows its list of city manager candidates
Daily Ticker
January 17, 2002
Daily Ticker
January 17, 2002
Dow Industrials 211.88, 9,712.27
Eleanore Schumacher
January 17, 2002
Shawnee pilot files for U.S. House seat
January 17, 2002
By Dave Ranney A former Navy pilot says he’s running for Congress. Adam Taff, a moderate Republican, announced his candidacy Wednesday during campaign appearances in Lawrence, Overland Park and Kansas City, Kan.
Fiery Hutchinson explosions remain geologic puzzle despite investigation
January 17, 2002
By Terry Rombeck Nobody not even geologists thought this could happen. When natural gas seeped through abandoned wells a year ago, causing two explosions that killed two people, it put Hutchinson residents on edge for months.
Numbers don’t lie regarding black coaches
If success, experience count in NFL, Green, Dungy should find jobs quickly
January 17, 2002
And then there was one. The litmus test for the NFL isn’t that the firings of Tony Dungy and Dennis Green leave Herman Edwards as the league’s only African-American head coach.
Dungy to interview for Colts’ coaching job
January 17, 2002
The Indianapolis Colts scheduled interviews with former Tampa Bay coach Tony Dungy and New York Jets defensive coordinator Ted Cottrell, agents for the two coaches told The Associated Press on Wednesday.
LMH adopts new retirement plan
January 17, 2002
By Jim Baker A new 401(k)-type retirement program will replace the current pension plan for employees of Lawrence Memorial Hospital effective April 1. Unlike the old plan, the program will allow for employee choice of investments.
McCartney to lead Super Bowl tribute to heroes
January 17, 2002
Paul McCartney has signed on to lead “a tribute to the spirit of everyday heroes” during the pregame show for Super Bowl XXXVI, set for Feb. 3 at the New Orleans Superdome, reports Billboard Online.
Planning dissent
January 17, 2002
Dad shared the value of a good read
January 17, 2002
By Rebekah Zemansky I finally made it this weekend to “The Lord of the Rings,” the three-hour-plus movie that is still keeping theaters packed after being out for three weeks something that no movie has managed to do for a long time. I enjoyed it, and find a full year a long time to wait until the next installment comes out.
Business Briefcase
January 17, 2002
Payless signs shoe diva amid layoffs, restructuring Retail: S&P 500 drops Kmart stock amid rating cuts by agencies Economy: Reports point to progress Automaker: GM posts profit but cuts bonuses, profit sharing Earnings: J.P. Morgan takes hit from Enron, Argentina woes
Coaches sues over Title IX
January 17, 2002
A federal law credited with transforming women’s athletics discriminates against men in low-profile college sports, coaches and athletes said in a lawsuit against the government. The suit filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia blames a 1996 rule clarifying the 1972 statute known as Title IX, which prohibits any school or college that receives federal funding from discriminating based on sex.
Cuban manages Dairy Queen
January 17, 2002
Wearing a navy blue denim shirt and a manager’s badge, Mark Cuban took orders, made change and served free ice cream cones at a Dairy Queen on Wednesday. The suburban fast-food restaurant drew more than 1,000 people, many waiting close to an hour to be served by the Dallas Mavericks’ billionaire owner, who was making good on a promise to be a manager for a day.
Lions, Firebirds could meet in Topeka tournament
January 17, 2002
By Steve Rottinghaus Lawrence High and Free State High have taken different routes to the Topeka Invitational boys basketball tournament, yet their paths could cross again this weekend. The Lions (7-2) have won six in a row heading to the three-day tourney at Topeka West. The Firebirds (2-6) have lost four straight, starting with a 53-44 setback to LHS on Dec. 21.
Dow drops as investors collect profits
January 17, 2002
A murky forecast from Intel sent stocks sharply lower Wednesday on worries that a recovery would take longer than expected and that the market had risen too high, too fast. The Dow Jones industrials tumbled more than 200 points to their weakest finish in 1 1/2 months with selling that spread across the market and intensified late in the session.
Home sales surge
Low interest rates fuel county’s rise in 2001
January 17, 2002
By Mark Fagan A national recession couldn’t keep Lawrence’s housing market down last year, and that has area real estate professionals looking forward to continued sales strength in 2002. Buyers snapped up 1,888 single-family homes last year in Douglas County, up 9.8 percent from 2000, according to a year-end report issued Wednesday by the Douglas County Appraiser’s Office.
IRS plans random audits of 50,000
January 17, 2002
Aiming to target its audits better, the IRS intends a special random check this year of about 50,000 individual tax returns but will subject fewer people to the intense, face-to-face questioning that drew heavy criticism in the past.
Enron auditor advised to shred
Fired accountant said Andersen lawyers encouraged destruction
January 17, 2002
An Arthur Andersen auditor fired for destroying documents in the Enron affair told congressional investigators Wednesday he was just following the advice of the accounting firm’s lawyers.
Math - Common-sense concepts aid math pupils
January 17, 2002
By Tim Carpenter Alex Palazzo’s theory is this: Big problems result when people fail at math. “If you’re the guy who counts down the space shuttle, and you don’t get it right, the guys will get ticked,” said Palazzo, a fourth-grader at Hillcrest School. Counting down from 10 is child’s play for Palazzo and his peers at Hillcrest, 1045 Hilltop Drive.
United Way campaign falls $64,000 short of goal
Despite fund-raising shortfall, organizers insist service agencies will receive their requested funds
January 17, 2002
By Joy Ludwig The slumping economy and aftermath of Sept. 11 may have prevented United Way of Douglas County from reaching its campaign goal, organizers said Wednesday. The agency raised $1,398,600 during the 2001-2002 campaign, or about $64,000 short of the original $1.46 million goal. Last year, United Way collected $1.42 million.
East side remains in 1st District
January 17, 2002
By Chad Lawhorn East Lawrence will remain in the county commission’s 1st District after a neighborhood association president said that seemed to be the consensus of residents. Douglas County commissioners Wednesday evening unanimously agreed on a redistricting plan to satisfy state and federal laws that districts be adjusted once a decade to ensure they are approximately equal in population.
Students protest tuition plan
KU offered presentations, not dialogue, group tells regents
January 17, 2002
By Terry Rombeck Kansas University’s student body president chastised administrators Wednesday for leaving students out of discussions on raising tuition. Justin Mills, flanked by about 20 KU students, told the Kansas Board of Regents that meetings about tuition conducted in December were “presentations, not dialogues.
THE MAG: What Are You Reading?
January 17, 2002
THE MAG: Power trio
Music production team aims its sights at the top of the charts
January 17, 2002
By Geoff Harkness Travis Bickle’s maniacal, not-all-there glare watches over the proceedings at Lock-N-Load studios, his iced gaze permanently affixed to a well-thumbed copy of “The Portable Machiavelli.” A few inches away, the original members of the Rat Pack shoot a game of pool, while Tony Montana and the cast of “The Usual Suspects” battle for elbow room next to a framed poster of H. Jackson Brown’s “21 Suggestions for Success” (“Be honest,” “Work at something you enjoy that’s worthy of your time and talent”).
Friends and neighbors
January 17, 2002
Friends and neighbors
January 17, 2002
Ten girls grinned after they got pinned. Daisy Troop No. 548 had its investiture and pinning ceremony at the November meeting. All the girls are kindergartners at Schwegler School. Back row, from left, are Lexi Mikel, Courtney Wiles, Amanda Montgomery, Caila Sparkes and Madison Holladay. Front row, from left, are Lauren Merino-Brammell, Emily Wangler, Katie Lomshek, Kayla Duncan and Logan Brown. Not pictured is Shana Rurode. Deb Wangler submitted the photograph. Got a shot for Friends & Neighbors? Send it, along with your name, phone number and caption information, to Friends & Neighbors, P.O. Box 888, Lawrence 66044. For more Friends and Neighbors, go to www.lawrence.com/publish/postem/friends.
Merlin G. Ewing
January 17, 2002
Tecumseh Graveside services for Merlin G. Ewing, 74, Tecumseh, formerly of Lawrence, will be at 1:30 p.m. Friday at Bethel Cemetery, southwest of Topeka, with military honors by Philip Billard Post No. 1650 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. Mr. Ewing died Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2002, at Stormont-Vail Regional Medical Center, Topeka.
Shoe bomb case linked to al-Qaida
January 17, 2002
The airline passenger accused of trying to ignite explosives in his shoes was indicted Wednesday on charges of being an al-Qaida-trained terrorist whose goal was to blow up the plane and kill the nearly 200 people aboard.
East side remains in 1st District
January 17, 2002
By Chad Lawhorn East Lawrence will remain in the county commission’s 1st District after a neighborhood association president said that seemed to be the consensus of residents. Douglas County commissioners Wednesday evening unanimously agreed on a redistricting plan to satisfy state and federal laws that districts be adjusted once a decade to ensure they are approximately equal in population.
Despite fund-raising shortfall, organizers insist service agencies will receive their requested funds
January 17, 2002
By Joy Ludwig The slumping economy and aftermath of Sept. 11 may have prevented United Way of Douglas County from reaching its campaign goal, organizers said Wednesday. The agency raised $1,398,600 during the 2001-2002 campaign, or about $64,000 short of the original $1.46 million goal. Last year, United Way collected $1.42 million.
IRS plans random audits of 50,000
January 17, 2002
Aiming to target its audits better, the IRS intends a special random check this year of about 50,000 individual tax returns but will subject fewer people to the intense, face-to-face questioning that drew heavy criticism in the past.
Senator: Philippines next target in U.S. war
January 17, 2002
U.S. Sen. Sam Brownback said Wednesday the U.S. was scaling up U.S. involvement in the Philippines, and could send even more troops and advisers. “It appears the Philippines is going to be the second, the next target, after Afghanistan in the war on terrorism,” Brownback said. “That Abu Sayyaf group is the target.”
coaching job
January 17, 2002
The Indianapolis Colts scheduled interviews with former Tampa Bay coach Tony Dungy and New York Jets defensive coordinator Ted Cottrell, agents for the two coaches told The Associated Press on Wednesday.
Management manual, golf balls on block
January 17, 2002
Former Enron Corp. employees are hawking dozens of company items on Internet auctions, including the embattled company’s 64-page code of ethics and a commemorative stock certificate. Former Enron employee Matt Mitchell is selling one of his two copies of a broadband risk-management manual used by the former energy giant.
Commodities
January 17, 2002
Local markets As of Wednesday’s close, courtesy of Ottawa Cooperative Assn. Ottawa Elevator Wheat, $2.74; corn, $1.87; milo, $1.85; soybeans, $4.20. Edgerton Elevator Wheat, $2.77; corn, $1.89; milo, $1.85; soybeans, $4.20. Overbrook Elevator Wheat, $2.77; corn, $1.87; milo, $1.85; soybeans, $4.20. Midland Elevator Wheat, NA; corn, $1.89; milo, NA; soybeans, $4.22. Lawrence Elevator Wheat, NA; corn, $1.92; milo, NA; soybeans, $4.25. Pauline Elevator Wheat, NA; corn, $1.92; milo, $1.90; soybeans, $4.25.
LMH adopts new retirement plan
January 17, 2002
By Jim Baker A new 401(k)-type retirement program will replace the current pension plan for employees of Lawrence Memorial Hospital effective April 1. Unlike the old plan, the program will allow for employee choice of investments.
McCartney to lead Super Bowl tribute to heroes
January 17, 2002
Paul McCartney has signed on to lead “a tribute to the spirit of everyday heroes” during the pregame show for Super Bowl XXXVI, set for Feb. 3 at the New Orleans Superdome, reports Billboard Online.
Conservatives mount anti-tax campaign
January 17, 2002
Conservative legislators have an alternative to Gov. Bill Graves’ plan to increase taxes. They call it the “Tax Me More” Fund, to collect voluntary contributions. Graves refused to ignore or brush off their facetious suggestion Wednesday.
THE MAG: Top Music
January 17, 2002
Singles 1. “U Got It Bad,” Usher
Fiery Hutchinson explosions remain geologic puzzle despite investigation
January 17, 2002
By Terry Rombeck Nobody not even geologists thought this could happen. When natural gas seeped through abandoned wells a year ago, causing two explosions that killed two people, it put Hutchinson residents on edge for months.
Shawnee pilot files for U.S. House seat
January 17, 2002
By Dave Ranney A former Navy pilot says he’s running for Congress. Adam Taff, a moderate Republican, announced his candidacy Wednesday during campaign appearances in Lawrence, Overland Park and Kansas City, Kan.
THE MAG: Top Movies
January 17, 2002
Video rentals 1. “The Princess Diaries”
THE MAG: Movie Listings
January 17, 2002
Ali Michael Mann’s sprawling biopic of legendary boxer Muhammad Ali only covers about 10 years of the Champ’s life, from 1964 to 1974. It’s long, frenetic and blessed with a great performance from Will Smith in the lead role. It’s also largely superficial, providing no real insight into Ali as a human being. Mann captures the intensity of the major events in Ali’s life, but these are the public moments, already well known to anyone with even a passing grasp of 20th century sports iconography. The private scenes — the ones that could tell viewers something about Ali the man — mostly serve to comment on the bigger moments, and reveal virtually nothing about who this person is once you strip away the trash talk and swagger. The relationship between Ali and broadcaster Howard Cosell (played by a typically chameleonic Jon Voight) is the most interesting aspect of the film, but it’s treated with the same superficiality as everything else. Mann is a talented filmmaker, and his energetic style is ideally suited to the story of such a charismatic figure. It’s too bad he let that charisma overwhelm the person underneath. (R) — LL
M
January 17, 2002
Laurie Koehn’s teammates knew she would come through for No. 9 Kansas State. She didn’t disappoint Wednesday night, hitting five three-pointers and then making an important free throw in the final seconds as the Wildcats defeated Texas A&M 66-61 to remain undefeated in the Big 12.
Cuban manages Dairy Queen
January 17, 2002
Wearing a navy blue denim shirt and a manager’s badge, Mark Cuban took orders, made change and served free ice cream cones at a Dairy Queen on Wednesday. The suburban fast-food restaurant drew more than 1,000 people, many waiting close to an hour to be served by the Dallas Mavericks’ billionaire owner, who was making good on a promise to be a manager for a day.
Coaches sues over Title IX
January 17, 2002
A federal law credited with transforming women’s athletics discriminates against men in low-profile college sports, coaches and athletes said in a lawsuit against the government. The suit filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia blames a 1996 rule clarifying the 1972 statute known as Title IX, which prohibits any school or college that receives federal funding from discriminating based on sex.
Kansas to honor Bridges
January 17, 2002
Bill Bridges, a Kansas University basketball All-American in 1961, will be honored at halftime of Saturday’s Kansas-Oklahoma game in Allen Fieldhouse. Bridges, who lives in Santa Monica, Calif., will be presented a Kansas Hall of Fame portrait during the ceremony.
Jayhawks clicked in Stillwater
January 17, 2002
By Gary Bedore Kansas sure looked pretty on offense during the first half of Tuesday’s 79-61 rout of Oklahoma State. Fast-break layups, three-point shots, dunks … a little bit of everything contributed to the No. 4-ranked Jayhawks’ 53-31 halftime lead against the country’s No. 6 squad.
s rise in 2001
January 17, 2002
By Mark Fagan A national recession couldn’t keep Lawrence’s housing market down last year, and that has area real estate professionals looking forward to continued sales strength in 2002. Buyers snapped up 1,888 single-family homes last year in Douglas County, up 9.8 percent from 2000, according to a year-end report issued Wednesday by the Douglas County Appraiser’s Office.
Dow drops as investors collect profits
January 17, 2002
A murky forecast from Intel sent stocks sharply lower Wednesday on worries that a recovery would take longer than expected and that the market had risen too high, too fast. The Dow Jones industrials tumbled more than 200 points to their weakest finish in 1 1/2 months with selling that spread across the market and intensified late in the session.
THE MAG: Top Music
January 17, 2002
THE MAG: Top Movies
January 17, 2002
Subversive action
January 17, 2002
Nothing fail-safe
January 17, 2002
Journal-World Editorial A California medical clinic collapse reiterates what can happen when care is not exerted. Big industries and businesses going broke. Flagship organizations of the most prosperous nation in the world struggling and failing, like the shameful mishandling of the Enron firm. Doctors, long among the income and wealth leaders of the nation, going down the tubes.
Math - 6News video report: Hillcrest Elementary teachers tailor tests to state standards
January 17, 2002
Trish Ayers reports on how students at Hillcrest Elementary have received the standard of excellence on the state math test using common-sense concepts.
Math - 6News video report: Math integrated throughout curriculum
January 17, 2002
Two Hillcrest teachers explain how teaching math is a collaborative process at Hillcrest School in Lawrence.
Baseball Briefs
January 17, 2002
Royals sign Rosado for $3.25 million Mariners sign Boone to three-year deal Oakland signs Dye for $32 million Angels agree to terms with outfielder Erstad Red Sox, Mirabelli agree on contract Twins’ Mays signs $20 million contract Pitcher Service signs pact with Pirates Pitcher Astacio signs with Mets Cardinals, Drew agree on one-year contract Catcher Servais signs Giants minor-league pact Cubs invite Benes to spring training Brewers add Young
6Sports video report: Lawrence High and Free State could meet again
January 17, 2002
James Sido reports on the upcoming basketball tournament games, and possible meeting, for Lawrence High and Free State at the Topeka Invitational tournament.
6Sports video report: Hawks hit 0-5 with fewest points ever scored by KU women’s basketball team
January 17, 2002
Kevin Romary reports on the fifth conference loss for the KU women’s basketball team.
People
January 17, 2002
Adam Ant committed Extremely incorrect message Fund benefits Indian students Stewart back as Grammys host
NBA Briefs
January 17, 2002
Hornets close to completing deal to move to New Orleans Pacers’ O’Neal ailing Hornets’ Brown hurt NBA wants Magic to stay in Orlando Crotty out with tendinitis Rodman suit could end
Powell urges diplomatic solution for Pakistan, India
January 17, 2002
(Updated Thursday at 12:43 p.m.) Secretary of State Colin Powell said Thursday he believed tensions had eased considerably between nuclear-armed neighbors India and Pakistan and said Washington stood ready to help “its two friends.”
KU offered presentations, not dialogue, group tells regents
January 17, 2002
By Terry Rombeck Kansas University’s student body president chastised administrators Wednesday for leaving students out of discussions on raising tuition. Justin Mills, flanked by about 20 KU students, told the Kansas Board of Regents that meetings about tuition conducted in December were “presentations, not dialogues.
Sound off
January 17, 2002
What regulations are there on paying for cigarettes with food stamps or other forms of government assistance? A cashier told me they just go through as a cash purchase. Federal regulations clearly prohibit food stamps being used to buy cigarettes, but there is nothing to stop someone who’s receiving cash assistance from using part of their allotment.
State ranks ninth highest in nation in gun sales to convicted criminals
January 17, 2002
Kansas is one of 22 states given a failing grade from a gun safety advocacy group because of the number of people legally barred from buying guns who were able to do so.A report released Wednesday by the Washington-based Americans for Gun Safety Foundation showed that during a 30-month period since mid-1999, 375 people, some of them convicted felons, bought guns in Kansas although their backgrounds should’ve prevented it.
THE MAG: Best Bets
January 17, 2002
   
Bush needs midterm victory
January 17, 2002
By Cal Thomas Tribune Media Services During his first year as president, George W. Bush has brought honor and decency back to the White House by treating his office as public property to be tenderly guarded and respected, not as his personal spoil of political war.
Still a favorite
January 17, 2002
Cierra Jordan, 6, a kindergarten student at New York School, works on her Hula Hoop. Cierra was at an after-school program Wednesday afternoon sponsored by Boys and Girls Club.
s first lady
January 17, 2002
By Greg Douros Mrs. Laura Bush The White House Washington D.C.
THE MAG: Arts Notes
January 17, 2002
‘Tomato Red’ author to appear at Rockhurst Lawrence artists show works in Kansas town Organ concert honors Martin Luther King Nelson prepares for Electromediascope
THE MAG: Calendar
January 17, 2002
NIGHTLIFE LAWRENCE
s basketball team
January 17, 2002
Kevin Romary reports on the fifth conference loss for the KU women’s basketball team.
Jordan suffers worst setback of career, 111-67
January 17, 2002
Michael Jordan was the attraction. The New Jersey Nets were the show. Playing before a sellout home crowd for the first time this season, the Nets were so good that even Jordan spent most of the night sitting and watching in awe.
THE MAG: News of the Weird
January 17, 2002
Lead stories Multinational corporations avoided $45 billion in U.S. taxes in 2000 by buying and selling with their own foreign subsidiaries at sometimes ridiculous prices, according to professors at Florida International University, in a study released in November by U.S. Sen. Byron Dorgan of North Dakota. For example, U.S. subsidiaries would buy (with tax paid to the other country) a toothbrush for $5,655 or a flashlight for $5,000, while U.S. subsidiaries would sell (tax paid to the United States) a bulldozer for $528 or a prefabricated metal building for 82 cents.
Merlin G. Ewing
January 17, 2002
Inloes services
January 17, 2002
Roddick withdraws in Australia
American injures ankle; Haas, Safin advance
January 17, 2002
Rising American standout Andy Roddick fell on an already injured right ankle in a losing first-set tiebreaker and pulled out of the Australian Open in the second round Thursday. Roddick, who hurt himself in his first-round victory, ran wide for a forehand, tried to use his right foot to stop, and tumbled awkwardly.
Owners approve Red Sox sale
Group led by Marlins owner Henry to purchase team for $660 million
January 17, 2002
On an historic day when baseball owners discussed trading teams instead of players, they voted Wednesday to approve the $660 million sale of the Boston Red Sox to a group led by Florida Marlins owner John Henry.
Top 25 Men: No. 16 ‘Bama escapes Georgia
January 17, 2002
With Georgia stunned by the suspension of two players, Alabama took advantage to win a rare road game in the Southeastern Conference. Rod Grizzard scored 16 points and made a key defensive play in the final minute Wednesday night as the 16th-ranked Crimson Tide held on for a 77-72 victory over No. 20 Georgia.
Top 25 Women: Koehn leads K-State past Texas A&M
January 17, 2002
Laurie Koehn’s teammates knew she would come through for No. 9 Kansas State. She didn’t disappoint Wednesday night, hitting five three-pointers and then making an important free throw in the final seconds as the Wildcats defeated Texas A&M 66-61 to remain undefeated in the Big 12.
Big 12 Men: No. 5 Sooners stifle Nebraska, 78-51
January 17, 2002
It didn’t take Oklahoma long to catch Nebraska with the way the Sooners were playing defense. The fifth-ranked Sooners held the Cornhuskers without a field goal for a 12:49 span over the end of the first half and start of the second to pull away for a 78-51 victory Wednesday night, their 13th straight.
NBA Roundup: Big crowd sees Nets roll
Jordan suffers worst setback of career, 111-67
January 17, 2002
Michael Jordan was the attraction. The New Jersey Nets were the show. Playing before a sellout home crowd for the first time this season, the Nets were so good that even Jordan spent most of the night sitting and watching in awe.
Kansas fails test on keeping guns away from felons
State ranks ninth highest in nation in gun sales to convicted criminals
January 17, 2002
Kansas is one of 22 states given a failing grade from a gun safety advocacy group because of the number of people legally barred from buying guns who were able to do so.A report released Wednesday by the Washington-based Americans for Gun Safety Foundation showed that during a 30-month period since mid-1999, 375 people, some of them convicted felons, bought guns in Kansas although their backgrounds should’ve prevented it.
Conservatives mount anti-tax campaign
January 17, 2002
Conservative legislators have an alternative to Gov. Bill Graves’ plan to increase taxes. They call it the “Tax Me More” Fund, to collect voluntary contributions. Graves refused to ignore or brush off their facetious suggestion Wednesday.
Senator: Philippines next target in U.S. war
January 17, 2002
U.S. Sen. Sam Brownback said Wednesday the U.S. was scaling up U.S. involvement in the Philippines, and could send even more troops and advisers. “It appears the Philippines is going to be the second, the next target, after Afghanistan in the war on terrorism,” Brownback said. “That Abu Sayyaf group is the target.”
Bush needs midterm victory
January 17, 2002
By Cal Thomas Tribune Media Services During his first year as president, George W. Bush has brought honor and decency back to the White House by treating his office as public property to be tenderly guarded and respected, not as his personal spoil of political war.
Violence against violence
January 17, 2002
By Ellen Goodman The Boston Globe He will go to jail wearing his own moniker: hockey dad. Not “gentle giant,” the label his defense lawyer tried to attach to his frame. Not “burly truck driver,” the phrase the media used to hint of dangerous bulk.
Arrogance comes before Enron’s fall
January 17, 2002
By George Will Washington Post Writers Group Jeff Skilling, Enron’s CEO until last August, who less than two years ago said Enron’s stock, then at $80, should sell for $126, also said traditional companies like ExxonMobil “will topple over from their own weight.”
Officials say al-Qaida prisoners vow they’ll kill while in Cuba
January 17, 2002
Several al-Qaida and Taliban prisoners have vowed to kill an American during their time at this remote U.S. military base, officials said Wednesday. Fifty detainees are being held at the facility and 30 more were to arrive late Wednesday or early today on a plane from Afghanistan, said Brig. Gen. Michael Lehnert, commander of U.S. Joint Task Force 160 overseeing the operation in Guantanamo Bay.
Taliban supporter questioned after turning himself in
January 17, 2002
U.S. investigators on Wednesday questioned a man who described himself as a financial supporter of the Taliban and showed up voluntarily at the biggest U.S. base in Afghanistan offering information.
Shoe bomb case linked to al-Qaida
January 17, 2002
The airline passenger accused of trying to ignite explosives in his shoes was indicted Wednesday on charges of being an al-Qaida-trained terrorist whose goal was to blow up the plane and kill the nearly 200 people aboard.
Deployment of U.S. troops mixed blessing for Philippines
January 17, 2002
Deploying some 660 U.S. troops may help control the Muslim extremist group that has plagued the Philippines for a decade, but the escalating American involvement will test ties between Washington and one of its closest allies in Southeast Asia.
People
January 17, 2002
Adam Ant committed Extremely incorrect message Fund benefits Indian students Stewart back as Grammys host
Science series for children coming to PBS
January 17, 2002
“DragonflyTV,” a new science series for children on PBS, is going to look a lot like an MTV video to some adults. “This stuff moves fast, and it has incessant music,” said executive producer Richard Hudson.
Washburn signs Lawrence
January 17, 2002
Former Free State High football standout Jake Lawrence has signed a letter of intent to play for Washburn and will transfer to the Topeka school for the spring semester. Lawrence spent the past two seasons at Butler County Community College. After playing offense as a freshman he switched to defense this fall and was the Grizzlies’ third-leading tackler with 66, including six sacks.
Buffaloes trample KU - Colorado women 70, Kansas 35
Jayhawks held to record-low point total
January 17, 2002
By Chuck Woodling Nobody promised Marian Washington a rose garden in her 29th season as Kansas University’s women’s basketball coach. But she was not expecting this many thorns. “I knew it would be tough,” Washington said in the wake of Wednesday night’s 70-35 pasting by No. 22 Colorado in Allen Fieldhouse, “but I don’t know if I thought it would be this challenging.”
Ex-Enron employees start online auctions
Management manual, golf balls on block
January 17, 2002
Former Enron Corp. employees are hawking dozens of company items on Internet auctions, including the embattled company’s 64-page code of ethics and a commemorative stock certificate. Former Enron employee Matt Mitchell is selling one of his two copies of a broadband risk-management manual used by the former energy giant.
Former Baker employee charges pregnancy led to her dismissal
January 17, 2002
By Joel Mathis Joss Bathke turned 1 year old Wednesday. It was a blessed event for his parents, Baldwin residents Joe and Leigh Anne Bathke. But it also served as reminder of an unfinished battle. Leigh Anne Bathke says her former employer, Baker University, fired her because she was pregnant.
THE MAG: A study in Scarlet
Pulitzer-nominated play ‘In the Blood’ offers modern retooling of literary classic
January 17, 2002
By Mitchell J. Near The latest production staged by The Unicorn Theatre is one of those rare adaptations of a known classic that can be viewed as an outright success in its own right. The fact that most people have yet to hear of it, or its playwright, makes that almost a crime punishable by a lifetime of attending New Theatre productions.
THE MAG: Model behavior
Femme Fatale’ examines history of marketing feminine image
January 17, 2002
By Mitchell J. Near Hollywood likes to roll out the biggest movies during the holiday season, hoping to garner critical consideration from pundits, while, more importantly, getting the consumers to part with their money before the year ends. But Hollywood studios are not the only group that plays that game; book publishers have been doing it for decades. And for many brick-and-mortar bookstores, the winter holidays are make-or-break time, where they gladly accept and stock a variety of items from suppliers that they know will be big sellers during the Christmas season.
THE MAG: Arts Notes
January 17, 2002
‘Tomato Red’ author to appear at Rockhurst Lawrence artists show works in Kansas town Organ concert honors Martin Luther King Nelson prepares for Electromediascope
THE MAG: Schizophrenic anesthetic
Milemarker solidifies its sound and lineup on latest release
January 17, 2002
By Geoff Harkness The keyboard may be one of rock’s most maligned instruments, the bane of many a garage band’s existence and the black sheep of the modern musical family. For better or worse, however, a burgeoning flock of bootstrapped rockers are introducing the 88s to unexplored aural environments, pairing Rolands and Yamahas with Gibsons and Fenders in ways previously unimagined. One such outfit is Chicago’s Milemarker, an ever-evolving gang of four or five that’s determined to use keyboards without watering down its sound or reverting to cheesy retro novelty.
THE MAG: Parting shot - Makin’ hay by Roger Nomer 01/17/2002
January 17, 2002
Art and Music - Commitment to elementary arts education strong
Lawrence public schools’ success in the ‘Three Rs’ assures the future of art and music education
January 17, 2002
By Michael Newman The new federal education bill, which President Bush recently signed into law, will among other things, mandate annual assessment testing in math and reading for students in grades three through eight. Schools that fail to perform up to prescribed standards will face the withdrawal of students by parents who are dissatisfied with substandard performance. Many school districts are bracing themselves in the face of assessment testing and will be forced to make difficult decisions about how to reallocate meager resources in order to raise flagging scores. Districts where scores are low enough to put a school’s future in peril will find at risk, educational programs that might not appear to directly have an impact on those measurements. Art and music programs run the risk of being treated as having secondary importance where measured progress in core academics is unsatisfactory.
Briefly
January 17, 2002
United Nations: Bin Laden, al-Qaida, Taliban subject of new sanctions New York City: Fund calls halt to donations Pakistan: Border tensions ease as Powell arrives in region New York City: Algerian sentenced in millennium bomb plot
ll kill while in Cuba
January 17, 2002
Several al-Qaida and Taliban prisoners have vowed to kill an American during their time at this remote U.S. military base, officials said Wednesday. Fifty detainees are being held at the facility and 30 more were to arrive late Wednesday or early today on a plane from Afghanistan, said Brig. Gen. Michael Lehnert, commander of U.S. Joint Task Force 160 overseeing the operation in Guantanamo Bay.
Taliban supporter questioned after turning himself in
January 17, 2002
U.S. investigators on Wednesday questioned a man who described himself as a financial supporter of the Taliban and showed up voluntarily at the biggest U.S. base in Afghanistan offering information.
Drug convictions fail to solve homicide
January 17, 2002
By Mike Belt A rural Lawrence man mysteriously gunned down at his home more than two years ago was allegedly involved in a massive marijuana distribution scheme that is sending several of his co-conspirators including a Baldwin pilot to federal prison.
Fired accountant said Andersen lawyers encouraged destruction
January 17, 2002
An Arthur Andersen auditor fired for destroying documents in the Enron affair told congressional investigators Wednesday he was just following the advice of the accounting firm’s lawyers.
If success, experience count in NFL, Green, Dungy should find jobs quickly
January 17, 2002
And then there was one. The litmus test for the NFL isn’t that the firings of Tony Dungy and Dennis Green leave Herman Edwards as the league’s only African-American head coach.
Italy pays homage to photography pioneer
January 17, 2002
Dozens of black and white pictures spanning three decades pay homage to the life and work of Margaret Bourke-White, one of the first women war photographers and the author of Life magazine’s first cover photo.
s fall
January 17, 2002
By George Will Washington Post Writers Group Jeff Skilling, Enron’s CEO until last August, who less than two years ago said Enron’s stock, then at $80, should sell for $126, also said traditional companies like ExxonMobil “will topple over from their own weight.”
6News video report: KU students take complaints to the Board of Regents
January 17, 2002
Tinna Terry reports on the arguments given by KU students to the Kansas Board of Regents.
Having a press pass in the sports world is almost as good as real credibility
January 17, 2002
By Seth Jones It’s amazing the places a press pass can get you. People don’t know who you are; all they know is that you have this little red card attached by a string hanging around your neck. Throw in a bad attitude and you’re suddenly an authority that can travel anywhere.
Afghan leader wants U.S. to make long-term commitment
January 17, 2002
(Updated Thursday at 6:24 a.m.) Prime Minister Hamid Karzai told U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell during a historic visit Thursday that Afghanistan needs a long-term commitment from the United States to become a normal country after years of being run by terrorists, and Powell promised that “we will be with you.”
Former Baker employee charges pregnancy led to her dismissal
January 17, 2002
By Joel Mathis Joss Bathke turned 1 year old Wednesday. It was a blessed event for his parents, Baldwin residents Joe and Leigh Anne Bathke. But it also served as reminder of an unfinished battle. Leigh Anne Bathke says her former employer, Baker University, fired her because she was pregnant.
brought to life in off-Broadway play
January 17, 2002
He was the fictional creation of Susan Vaughan Smith, the white South Carolina woman who, in 1994, drowned her two small sons and blamed a phantom black man for the crimes.
Big 12 Men: No. 5 Sooners stifle Nebraska, 78-51
January 17, 2002
It didn’t take Oklahoma long to catch Nebraska with the way the Sooners were playing defense. The fifth-ranked Sooners held the Cornhuskers without a field goal for a 12:49 span over the end of the first half and start of the second to pull away for a 78-51 victory Wednesday night, their 13th straight.
Roger Dale DeAtley
January 17, 2002
Services for Roger Dale DeAtley, 39, Lawrence, will be at 11 a.m. today at Ralph O. Jones Chapel, Odessa, Mo. Burial will be in Greenton Cemetery, Odessa. Mr. DeAtley died Monday, Jan. 14, 2002, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
Guthrie services
January 17, 2002
Services for Gladys Helen Guthrie, 85, Lawrence, will be at 11 a.m. Friday at Warren-McElwain Mortuary. Burial will be in Memorial Park Cemetery. Mrs. Guthrie, a lifelong Lawrence resident, died Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2002, at Lakeview Manor Nursing Home, Lawrence.
On the street
January 17, 2002
What is your prediction for snow this winter? Ray Cross,restaurant owner,Lawrence
Nothing fail-safe
January 17, 2002
Journal-World Editorial A California medical clinic collapse reiterates what can happen when care is not exerted. Big industries and businesses going broke. Flagship organizations of the most prosperous nation in the world struggling and failing, like the shameful mishandling of the Enron firm. Doctors, long among the income and wealth leaders of the nation, going down the tubes.
Sage advice
January 17, 2002
To the editor: Thank you to the J-W and Business Editor Mark Fagan for Sunday’s article on the demise of Oread Inc. That is the kind of reporting on local businesses and events that keeps me purchasing your newspaper.
Subversive action
January 17, 2002
To the editor: The Lawrence Journal-World has struck to the heart of Lawrence’s growing pains with your Jan. 13 article (“Planners act draws criticism”) on how some planning commissioners regularly overrule planning policies set forth in our comprehensive plan, Horizon 2020, and with your editorial of Jan. 15 (“Policy matters”) on why subverting established policy is not an acceptable way for appointed planning commissioners to seek change in that plan.
Science series for children coming to PBS
January 17, 2002
“DragonflyTV,” a new science series for children on PBS, is going to look a lot like an MTV video to some adults. “This stuff moves fast, and it has incessant music,” said executive producer Richard Hudson.
Milemarker solidifies its sound and lineup on latest release
January 17, 2002
By Geoff Harkness The keyboard may be one of rock’s most maligned instruments, the bane of many a garage band’s existence and the black sheep of the modern musical family. For better or worse, however, a burgeoning flock of bootstrapped rockers are introducing the 88s to unexplored aural environments, pairing Rolands and Yamahas with Gibsons and Fenders in ways previously unimagined. One such outfit is Chicago’s Milemarker, an ever-evolving gang of four or five that’s determined to use keyboards without watering down its sound or reverting to cheesy retro novelty.
Briefly
January 17, 2002
United Nations: Bin Laden, al-Qaida, Taliban subject of new sanctions New York City: Fund calls halt to donations Pakistan: Border tensions ease as Powell arrives in region New York City: Algerian sentenced in millennium bomb plot
Horoscopes
January 17, 2002
For Thursday, Jan. 17, 2002: Those with birthdays today: You can’t always trust your hunches this year. You’re changing internally, and with this transformation, your intuition could be off. You need less time at work and more time to recharge and enjoy life. Be honest with yourself — your work could be draining you. Discuss a change with those who care about you. If you are single, your popularity will mount, allowing you to meet many people. If attached, you need to share more of your frustration with your loved one.
Dad shared the value of a good read
January 17, 2002
By Rebekah Zemansky I finally made it this weekend to “The Lord of the Rings,” the three-hour-plus movie that is still keeping theaters packed after being out for three weeks something that no movie has managed to do for a long time. I enjoyed it, and find a full year a long time to wait until the next installment comes out.
Resorts find snow tubing a popular alternative to skiing
January 17, 2002
Kris Carr gets paid to push people off the side of a mountain. The skinny 15-year-old asks if you’re ready and then, using his hands or feet, sends you zipping in an inner tube down a slick, snowy slope that somewhat resembles a bobsled track. When the ride down the 750-foot-long trail is over, a rope tows you back to the top for a repeat performance.
examines history of marketing feminine image
January 17, 2002
By Mitchell J. Near Hollywood likes to roll out the biggest movies during the holiday season, hoping to garner critical consideration from pundits, while, more importantly, getting the consumers to part with their money before the year ends. But Hollywood studios are not the only group that plays that game; book publishers have been doing it for decades. And for many brick-and-mortar bookstores, the winter holidays are make-or-break time, where they gladly accept and stock a variety of items from suppliers that they know will be big sellers during the Christmas season.
assures the future of art and music education
January 17, 2002
By Michael Newman The new federal education bill, which President Bush recently signed into law, will among other things, mandate annual assessment testing in math and reading for students in grades three through eight. Schools that fail to perform up to prescribed standards will face the withdrawal of students by parents who are dissatisfied with substandard performance. Many school districts are bracing themselves in the face of assessment testing and will be forced to make difficult decisions about how to reallocate meager resources in order to raise flagging scores. Districts where scores are low enough to put a school’s future in peril will find at risk, educational programs that might not appear to directly have an impact on those measurements. Art and music programs run the risk of being treated as having secondary importance where measured progress in core academics is unsatisfactory.
Jayhawks held to record-low point total
January 17, 2002
By Chuck Woodling Nobody promised Marian Washington a rose garden in her 29th season as Kansas University’s women’s basketball coach. But she was not expecting this many thorns. “I knew it would be tough,” Washington said in the wake of Wednesday night’s 70-35 pasting by No. 22 Colorado in Allen Fieldhouse, “but I don’t know if I thought it would be this challenging.”
Deployment of U.S. troops mixed blessing for Philippines
January 17, 2002
Deploying some 660 U.S. troops may help control the Muslim extremist group that has plagued the Philippines for a decade, but the escalating American involvement will test ties between Washington and one of its closest allies in Southeast Asia.
Lions, Firebirds could meet in Topeka tournament
January 17, 2002
By Steve Rottinghaus Lawrence High and Free State High have taken different routes to the Topeka Invitational boys basketball tournament, yet their paths could cross again this weekend. The Lions (7-2) have won six in a row heading to the three-day tourney at Topeka West. The Firebirds (2-6) have lost four straight, starting with a 53-44 setback to LHS on Dec. 21.
Music production team aims its sights at the top of the charts
January 17, 2002
By Geoff Harkness Travis Bickle’s maniacal, not-all-there glare watches over the proceedings at Lock-N-Load studios, his iced gaze permanently affixed to a well-thumbed copy of “The Portable Machiavelli.” A few inches away, the original members of the Rat Pack shoot a game of pool, while Tony Montana and the cast of “The Usual Suspects” battle for elbow room next to a framed poster of H. Jackson Brown’s “21 Suggestions for Success” (“Be honest,” “Work at something you enjoy that’s worthy of your time and talent”).
Horoscopes
January 17, 2002
s recent past
January 17, 2002
By Jon Niccum It’s October 1993, and the African nation of Somalia is plagued by famine and civil war. In one of numerous atrocities, a militia controlled by Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid fires into a starving crowd of civilians that is attempting to access a Red Cross food distribution center in Mogadishu.
s Mag, with Jon Niccum
January 17, 2002
Whats new in this week’s Mag, with Jon Niccum
THE MAG: What Are You Reading?
January 17, 2002
   
Local Briefs
January 17, 2002
Classes resume today at KU to kick off spring semester Classes for Kansas University students resume today for the spring semester. Students have been trickling back to campus since Monday, when residence halls reopened. There will be no classes Monday in observance of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. Students don’t have another vacation scheduled until spring break, which is March 18-24. Stop day for the spring semester is May 10, with finals scheduled for May 13-17. Commencement is May 19. Above, Amy Innes, left, and Alicia Sanson, both KU freshman from Phillipsburg, review their schedules of spring semester classes. _______________________________________ Environment: Advisory committee meets to discuss county air quality The Lawrence-Douglas County Air Quality Advisory Committee convened Wednesday for its first-ever meeting. The committee of environmentalists, industry representatives and health officials, will meet every three months to discuss ways the county can improve its air quality. Public health is a concern, but so is money. Douglas County commissioners asked that the committee be formed after the Environmental Protection Agency considered grouping the county with the Kansas City metropolitan area in a program that would have made federal highway dollars dependent on meeting air-quality standards. EPA ultimately decided not to take the action, but local officials decided to act anyway. “Anything we do at this point is pre-emptive,” said Karl Birns, an environmental scientist at Kansas University. The committee meets next at 10:30 a.m. April 17 at the Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department. _______________________________________ SCHOOLS: Oskaloosa to pare staff in budget-tightening year Oskaloosa public schools won’t replace the elementary school principal this fall and may eliminate up to nine positions to make up for a projected loss in state aid and declining enrollment. Supt. Loren Lutes said Wednesday the district is anticipating about a $250,000 shortfall during the 2002-03 school year, meaning the budget will fall from $5.1 million to $4.8 million. He said the school board voted Tuesday night not to replace elementary principal Kathy Godsey-Drum, who is leaving at the end of the school year her first on the job. Instead, Lutes said the middle school principal will cover kindergarten through eighth-grade and the assistant high school principal will assist both the middle school and high school principals. During the next two months, Lutes said the school board also will decide where to cut three to four teaching positions and four to five support positions. He said he hopes some positions will be decreased by attrition. _______________________________________ Crime: KU student reports theft of personal identity items Someone is using a Kansas University student’s identity to apply for credit cards and then going on shopping sprees. Lawrence Police are investigating the case in which a 22-year-old Great Bend woman is the victim. She told police she was notified Jan. 7 by Fashion Bug, a Topeka store, that someone was using a credit card in her name, Sgt. Mark Warren said. Additional checks showed credit cards from Sears and JC Penney were obtained with the woman’s name. More than $1,600 worth of merchandise had been charged to the Sears card, police reported. The charges were made since September, Warren said. Total amounts have yet to be determined. Police have a suspect but no arrest has been made, Warren said. “They have to work against the clock before they are discovered,” Warren said of credit card culprits. “This is definitely something we all need to be aware of and think about.”
Washburn signs Lawrence
January 17, 2002
Former Free State High football standout Jake Lawrence has signed a letter of intent to play for Washburn and will transfer to the Topeka school for the spring semester. Lawrence spent the past two seasons at Butler County Community College. After playing offense as a freshman he switched to defense this fall and was the Grizzlies’ third-leading tackler with 66, including six sacks.
Figment of ‘Brutal Imagination’ brought to life in off-Broadway play
January 17, 2002
He was the fictional creation of Susan Vaughan Smith, the white South Carolina woman who, in 1994, drowned her two small sons and blamed a phantom black man for the crimes.
A Slippery Slope
Resorts find snow tubing a popular alternative to skiing
January 17, 2002
Kris Carr gets paid to push people off the side of a mountain. The skinny 15-year-old asks if you’re ready and then, using his hands or feet, sends you zipping in an inner tube down a slick, snowy slope that somewhat resembles a bobsled track. When the ride down the 750-foot-long trail is over, a rope tows you back to the top for a repeat performance.
Drug convictions fail to solve homicide
January 17, 2002
By Mike Belt A rural Lawrence man mysteriously gunned down at his home more than two years ago was allegedly involved in a massive marijuana distribution scheme that is sending several of his co-conspirators including a Baldwin pilot to federal prison.
offers modern retooling of literary classic
January 17, 2002
By Mitchell J. Near The latest production staged by The Unicorn Theatre is one of those rare adaptations of a known classic that can be viewed as an outright success in its own right. The fact that most people have yet to hear of it, or its playwright, makes that almost a crime punishable by a lifetime of attending New Theatre productions.
THE MAG: Top Movies
January 17, 2002
THE MAG: Movie Listings
January 17, 2002
Violence against violence
January 17, 2002
By Ellen Goodman The Boston Globe He will go to jail wearing his own moniker: hockey dad. Not “gentle giant,” the label his defense lawyer tried to attach to his frame. Not “burly truck driver,” the phrase the media used to hint of dangerous bulk.
Area Briefs
January 17, 2002
Deliberations continue in DeSoto murder trial Sentencing hearing continued in minister’s sex-crimes case Ottawa narrows its list of city manager candidates
Italy pays homage to photography pioneer
January 17, 2002
Dozens of black and white pictures spanning three decades pay homage to the life and work of Margaret Bourke-White, one of the first women war photographers and the author of Life magazine’s first cover photo.
American injures ankle
January 17, 2002
Rising American standout Andy Roddick fell on an already injured right ankle in a losing first-set tiebreaker and pulled out of the Australian Open in the second round Thursday. Roddick, who hurt himself in his first-round victory, ran wide for a forehand, tried to use his right foot to stop, and tumbled awkwardly.
January 17, 2002
By Loey Lockerby Brad Anderson’s “Happy Accidents” is sort of a cinematic Frankenstein monster, pieced together from the remains of other movies. There’s a touch of “K-PAX, ” a bit of “Somewhere in Time,” a smidgen of “Memento,” and quite a lot of the classic short film “La Jete.” Even with these derivative roots, however, “Happy Accidents” is told with enough cleverness to make it a diverting fantasy.
THE MAG: Top Movies
January 17, 2002
Movies 1. “The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring,” $16.1 million
Bama escapes Georgia
January 17, 2002
With Georgia stunned by the suspension of two players, Alabama took advantage to win a rare road game in the Southeastern Conference. Rod Grizzard scored 16 points and made a key defensive play in the final minute Wednesday night as the 16th-ranked Crimson Tide held on for a 77-72 victory over No. 20 Georgia.
USOC officials predict record medal haul
January 17, 2002
The United States never has won more than 13 medals at a Winter Olympics. Next month, it expects to almost double that record. Buoyed by the recent performances of skater Michelle Kwan, skier Bode Miller and others, U.S. Olympic Committee leaders predicted Wednesday that Americans would win at least 20 medals at the Salt Lake City Games.
Horoscopes
January 17, 2002
NBA Briefs
January 17, 2002
Hornets close to completing deal to move to New Orleans Pacers’ O’Neal ailing Hornets’ Brown hurt NBA wants Magic to stay in Orlando Crotty out with tendinitis Rodman suit could end
THE MAG: Wake Up Call - Reform school
Mag political columnist writes an educational letter to America’s first lady
January 17, 2002
By Greg Douros Mrs. Laura Bush The White House Washington D.C.
Montreal goaltender Theodore celebrates All-Star selection with shutout
January 17, 2002
Jose Theodore had more to celebrate than he thought. Theodore gained his fourth shutout of the season, and Jan Bulis and Patrice Brisebois scored second-period goals to lead the Montreal Canadiens to a 2-0 win over the Washington Capitals on Wednesday night.
Births
January 17, 2002
Bill and Yvette Gadberry, Eudora, a boy, Tuesday.
Group led by Marlins owner Henry to purchase team for $660 million
January 17, 2002
On an historic day when baseball owners discussed trading teams instead of players, they voted Wednesday to approve the $660 million sale of the Boston Red Sox to a group led by Florida Marlins owner John Henry.
Math - Common-sense concepts aid math pupils
January 17, 2002
By Tim Carpenter Alex Palazzo’s theory is this: Big problems result when people fail at math. “If you’re the guy who counts down the space shuttle, and you don’t get it right, the guys will get ticked,” said Palazzo, a fourth-grader at Hillcrest School. Counting down from 10 is child’s play for Palazzo and his peers at Hillcrest, 1045 Hilltop Drive.
On the record
January 17, 2002
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
Business Briefcase
January 17, 2002
Payless signs shoe diva amid layoffs, restructuring Retail: S&P 500 drops Kmart stock amid rating cuts by agencies Economy: Reports point to progress Automaker: GM posts profit but cuts bonuses, profit sharing Earnings: J.P. Morgan takes hit from Enron, Argentina woes
NHL Roundup: Canadiens turn back Capitals, 2-0
Montreal goaltender Theodore celebrates All-Star selection with shutout
January 17, 2002
Jose Theodore had more to celebrate than he thought. Theodore gained his fourth shutout of the season, and Jan Bulis and Patrice Brisebois scored second-period goals to lead the Montreal Canadiens to a 2-0 win over the Washington Capitals on Wednesday night.
USOC officials predict record medal haul
January 17, 2002
The United States never has won more than 13 medals at a Winter Olympics. Next month, it expects to almost double that record. Buoyed by the recent performances of skater Michelle Kwan, skier Bode Miller and others, U.S. Olympic Committee leaders predicted Wednesday that Americans would win at least 20 medals at the Salt Lake City Games.
National briefs
January 17, 2002
Washington, D.C.: Kennedy seeks delay in Bush tax cuts Pennsylvania: Alcohol concerns raise Groundhog Day security New Jersey: Crane mishap puts 1,000 out of homes
National briefs
January 17, 2002
Washington, D.C.: Kennedy seeks delay in Bush tax cuts Pennsylvania: Alcohol concerns raise Groundhog Day security New Jersey: Crane mishap puts 1,000 out of homes
hay by Roger Nomer 01/17/2002
January 17, 2002
Makin’ hay by Roger Nomer
January 17, 2002
By Dan Lybarger With its sterling literary pedigree, picturesque setting, proven creative team and dream cast, “The Shipping News” ultimately ends up less than the sum of its parts. In adapting E. Annie Proulx’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, writer Robert Nelson Jacobs and director Lasse Hallstrm (the team behind “Chocolat”) capture an intriguing folk-tale ambiance but have trouble making some of the exaggerated story consistently credible.
6Sports video report: Lawrence High and Free State could meet again
January 17, 2002
James Sido reports on the upcoming basketball tournament games, and possible meeting, for Lawrence High and Free State at the Topeka Invitational tournament.
Horoscopes
January 17, 2002
For Thursday, Jan. 17, 2002: Those with birthdays today: You can’t always trust your hunches this year. You’re changing internally, and with this transformation, your intuition could be off. You need less time at work and more time to recharge and enjoy life. Be honest with yourself your work could be draining you. Discuss a change with those who care about you. If you are single, your popularity will mount, allowing you to meet many people. If attached, you need to share more of your frustration with your loved one.
Local Briefs
January 17, 2002
Classes resume today at KU to kick off spring semester Classes for Kansas University students resume today for the spring semester. Students have been trickling back to campus since Monday, when residence halls reopened. There will be no classes Monday in observance of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. Students don’t have another vacation scheduled until spring break, which is March 18-24. Stop day for the spring semester is May 10, with finals scheduled for May 13-17. Commencement is May 19. Above, Amy Innes, left, and Alicia Sanson, both KU freshman from Phillipsburg, review their schedules of spring semester classes. _______________________________________ Environment: Advisory committee meets to discuss county air quality The Lawrence-Douglas County Air Quality Advisory Committee convened Wednesday for its first-ever meeting. The committee of environmentalists, industry representatives and health officials, will meet every three months to discuss ways the county can improve its air quality. Public health is a concern, but so is money. Douglas County commissioners asked that the committee be formed after the Environmental Protection Agency considered grouping the county with the Kansas City metropolitan area in a program that would have made federal highway dollars dependent on meeting air-quality standards. EPA ultimately decided not to take the action, but local officials decided to act anyway. “Anything we do at this point is pre-emptive,” said Karl Birns, an environmental scientist at Kansas University. The committee meets next at 10:30 a.m. April 17 at the Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department. _______________________________________ SCHOOLS: Oskaloosa to pare staff in budget-tightening year Oskaloosa public schools won’t replace the elementary school principal this fall and may eliminate up to nine positions to make up for a projected loss in state aid and declining enrollment. Supt. Loren Lutes said Wednesday the district is anticipating about a $250,000 shortfall during the 2002-03 school year, meaning the budget will fall from $5.1 million to $4.8 million. He said the school board voted Tuesday night not to replace elementary principal Kathy Godsey-Drum, who is leaving at the end of the school year her first on the job. Instead, Lutes said the middle school principal will cover kindergarten through eighth-grade and the assistant high school principal will assist both the middle school and high school principals. During the next two months, Lutes said the school board also will decide where to cut three to four teaching positions and four to five support positions. He said he hopes some positions will be decreased by attrition. _______________________________________ Crime: KU student reports theft of personal identity items Someone is using a Kansas University student’s identity to apply for credit cards and then going on shopping sprees. Lawrence Police are investigating the case in which a 22-year-old Great Bend woman is the victim. She told police she was notified Jan. 7 by Fashion Bug, a Topeka store, that someone was using a credit card in her name, Sgt. Mark Warren said. Additional checks showed credit cards from Sears and JC Penney were obtained with the woman’s name. More than $1,600 worth of merchandise had been charged to the Sears card, police reported. The charges were made since September, Warren said. Total amounts have yet to be determined. Police have a suspect but no arrest has been made, Warren said. “They have to work against the clock before they are discovered,” Warren said of credit card culprits. “This is definitely something we all need to be aware of and think about.”
THE MAG: Out of Bounds - Unlimited access
Having a press pass in the sports world is almost as good as real credibility
January 17, 2002
By Seth Jones It’s amazing the places a press pass can get you. People don’t know who you are; all they know is that you have this little red card attached by a string hanging around your neck. Throw in a bad attitude and you’re suddenly an authority that can travel anywhere.
Math - 6News video report: Hillcrest Elementary teachers tailor tests to state standards
January 17, 2002
Trish Ayers reports on how students at Hillcrest Elementary have received the standard of excellence on the state math test using common-sense concepts.
On the record
January 17, 2002
6News video report: KU students take complaints to the Board of Regents
January 17, 2002
Tinna Terry reports on the arguments given by KU students to the Kansas Board of Regents.
Jayhawks clicked in Stillwater
January 17, 2002
By Gary Bedore Kansas sure looked pretty on offense during the first half of Tuesday’s 79-61 rout of Oklahoma State. Fast-break layups, three-point shots, dunks … a little bit of everything contributed to the No. 4-ranked Jayhawks’ 53-31 halftime lead against the country’s No. 6 squad.
Kansas to honor Bridges
January 17, 2002
Bill Bridges, a Kansas University basketball All-American in 1961, will be honored at halftime of Saturday’s Kansas-Oklahoma game in Allen Fieldhouse. Bridges, who lives in Santa Monica, Calif., will be presented a Kansas Hall of Fame portrait during the ceremony.