Archive for Sunday, February 3, 2002

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Local briefs
February 3, 2002
Plaque honoring Hughes finds home at arts center The former Carnegie Library officially will be known as a place Langston Hughes frequented as a child. About 20 people attended the plaque dedication ceremony Saturday at the Lawrence Arts Center, site of the former library, 200 W. Ninth St. “To me, the Carnegie Library is one of the powerful symbols of Lawrence,” Lawrence Mayor Mike Rundle said. Hughes, a poet, novelist and playwright, lived a few blocks from the library with his grandmother, Mary Leary Langston, during the early 1900s. The plaque, which will be on the building’s front, reads in part: “… When I was in the second grade, my grandmother took me to Lawrence to raise me. And I was unhappy for a long time, and very lonesome. … Then it was that books began to happen to me, and I began to believe in nothing but books and the wonderful world of books.” The quote is from Hughes’ first autobiography, “The Big Sea.” Lawrence resident Hobart Jackson, above, discussed the text on the plaque Saturday at the arts center. Clark Coan, Lawrence, helped initiate the plaque idea and proposed some of the Hughes centennial events. ____________________________________ Brain teaser: Hughes quiz, Day 4 This is one in a series of questions to test your knowledge on Langston Hughes, as part of the celebration of his 100th birthday. A new question will appear each day through Feb. 14. Each day’s answer will be posted at langstonhughes.ljworld.com. 4) In addition to Lewis Sheridan Leary, what other abolitionist was an important part of Langston Hughes’ lineage? Answer to Saturday’s question: Lewis Sheridan Leary, Mary Langston’s first husband. ____________________________________ Severe weather: Electrical outages still affect 500 customers in county After more than three days without electricity, Denise Fish and her family are frustrated, but are trying to remain patient until the power kicks on again. “I’ve been totally bored,” she said Saturday. “I’ve been driving around in the car to keep warm. Staying at friends’ … shopping.” Fish and her husband, Larry, and their two children, have been without power since Wednesday night at their home near the O’Connell Youth Ranch, south of Kansas Highway 10. They all stayed with different friends or relatives Saturday night. “It seems like it’s been an eternity,” Denise Fish said. The Fish family was one of about 500 Westar Energy customers in Douglas County who still did not have power Saturday night. About 22,000 customers remained without service across the state, said Westar spokeswoman Cynthia McCarvel. “Crews are working as fast as possible to restore service safely,” she said.
Horoscopes
February 3, 2002
Bookstore
February 3, 2002
Charlene M. Flott
February 3, 2002
Business briefs
February 3, 2002
Lorin A. Snow
February 3, 2002
It’s an ‘80s fashion revival
In apparel and hair, bigger is back but better
February 3, 2002
Local briefs
February 3, 2002
Plaque honoring Hughes finds home at arts center The former Carnegie Library officially will be known as a place Langston Hughes frequented as a child. About 20 people attended the plaque dedication ceremony Saturday at the Lawrence Arts Center, site of the former library, 200 W. Ninth St. “To me, the Carnegie Library is one of the powerful symbols of Lawrence,” Lawrence Mayor Mike Rundle said. Hughes, a poet, novelist and playwright, lived a few blocks from the library with his grandmother, Mary Leary Langston, during the early 1900s. The plaque, which will be on the building’s front, reads in part: “… When I was in the second grade, my grandmother took me to Lawrence to raise me. And I was unhappy for a long time, and very lonesome. … Then it was that books began to happen to me, and I began to believe in nothing but books and the wonderful world of books.” The quote is from Hughes’ first autobiography, “The Big Sea.” Lawrence resident Hobart Jackson, above, discussed the text on the plaque Saturday at the arts center. Clark Coan, Lawrence, helped initiate the plaque idea and proposed some of the Hughes centennial events. ____________________________________ Brain teaser: Hughes quiz, Day 4 This is one in a series of questions to test your knowledge on Langston Hughes, as part of the celebration of his 100th birthday. A new question will appear each day through Feb. 14. Each day’s answer will be posted at langstonhughes.ljworld.com. 4) In addition to Lewis Sheridan Leary, what other abolitionist was an important part of Langston Hughes’ lineage? Answer to Saturday’s question: Lewis Sheridan Leary, Mary Langston’s first husband. ____________________________________ Severe weather: Electrical outages still affect 500 customers in county After more than three days without electricity, Denise Fish and her family are frustrated, but are trying to remain patient until the power kicks on again. “I’ve been totally bored,” she said Saturday. “I’ve been driving around in the car to keep warm. Staying at friends’ … shopping.” Fish and her husband, Larry, and their two children, have been without power since Wednesday night at their home near the O’Connell Youth Ranch, south of Kansas Highway 10. They all stayed with different friends or relatives Saturday night. “It seems like it’s been an eternity,” Denise Fish said. The Fish family was one of about 500 Westar Energy customers in Douglas County who still did not have power Saturday night. About 22,000 customers remained without service across the state, said Westar spokeswoman Cynthia McCarvel. “Crews are working as fast as possible to restore service safely,” she said.
Age issue
February 3, 2002
Enron records
February 3, 2002
Burnham services
February 3, 2002
ACLU misguided
February 3, 2002
Friends and neighbors
February 3, 2002
John H. Snowden
February 3, 2002
Dorothy Cohen Keltz
February 3, 2002
Farrel D. Tolbert
February 3, 2002
Old home town - 25, 40 and 100 years ago today
February 3, 2002
On the record
February 3, 2002