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Archive for Thursday, June 7, 2001

All stories

Man found guilty in Wendy’s robbery
June 7, 2001
(Updated Thursday at 2:53 p.m.) A Douglas County jury Wednesday deliberated about 90 minutes before finding Duwone Flowers guilty of attempting to rob a Lawrence restaurant.
McVeigh’s defense files appeal after judge denies execution stay
June 7, 2001
(Updated Friday at 1:36 a.m.) Saying a federal judge “succumbed to the human tragedy” of the Oklahoma City bombing, Timothy McVeigh’s attorneys on Thursday asked an appeals court to postpone his execution again.
Bush signs tax cut into law
June 7, 2001
(Web Posted Thursday at 11:22 a.m.) Fulfilling a central campaign promise, President Bush signed into law Thursday a $1.35 trillion tax cut bill that will immediately benefit every American who pays income taxes but will require years to take full effect.
TOP MOVIES
June 7, 2001
SEVEN QUESTIONS with Donny Osmond
June 7, 2001
By Jon Niccum Donny Osmond has always been a target for criticism. When the teen singer and his brothers came to prominence as The Osmonds during the early 1970s, he was immediately dismissed as a cleaned-up, whiter version of Michael Jackson from The Jackson Five. But over the last decade, Osmond has been able to accomplish something the King of Pop hasn’t: He’s been able to evolve.
SEVEN QUESTIONS with Davy Jones of The Monkees
June 7, 2001
By Geoff Harkness There are hundreds of bands that helped create rock history but few transcend the world of music and become popular culture. The Monkees are pop culture. One of rock music’s first unabashedly manufactured ensembles, the band practically owned the charts and the television airwaves during the mid-‘60s.
People
June 7, 2001
6Sports report: Hilgenkamp off to Europe
June 7, 2001
Kevin Romary reports on KU women’s basketball player KC Hilgenkamp’s selection as a member of the Big 12 all-star squad. The team will play a series of games in Europe this August.
6Sports report: KU golfers dominate Fourball
June 7, 2001
Andy Stewart and Chris Marshall dominated a rain-delayed second day of the KGA Fourball tournament at Alvamar. Currently the duo holds a six stroke lead.
6Sports report: Free State football breaks tradition
June 7, 2001
James Sido reports from the Free State Firebirds’ week-long training camp, where the team is looking to try something a little different.
Roddick recovery certain
June 7, 2001
French Open notes. … Andy Roddick says he fully expects to play at the Queen’s Club tournament later this month. “I will be fine by then,” Roddick said Wednesday in Paris, where he is receiving treatment for a strained left thigh that forced him to retired from his match against Lleyton Hewitt last Friday.
Sixers’ defense slows Bryant
June 7, 2001
Kobe Bryant got isolation on Raja Bell, started to drive and was stripped of the ball. Everywhere Bryant went Wednesday night, the Philadelphia 76ers had somebody there. While Allen Iverson scored 48 points, the Sixers’ defense shut down Bryant in Game 1 of the NBA Finals.
Devils seek clinching victory tonight
New Jersey focuses on third championship since 1995; Avs hope to force Game Seven in Colorado
June 7, 2001
The New Jersey Devils are one victory, one more game when all goes right, from doing something special. Something that would make a handful of engraved names on a silver chalice stand out all the more, perhaps glitter a little brighter. Something that separates the great teams from merely the good ones.
Agassi ousted in four sets
France’s Grosjean delights partisan crowd, reaches semifinals
June 7, 2001
Former President Clinton showed up at the French Open to root for Andre Agassi, stayed for most of three sets and saw him win three games. While Clinton had little to cheer about, Frenchman Sebastien Grosjean delighted the partisan Parisians in the capacity crowd with the match of his life Wednesday to win 1-6, 6-1, 6-1, 6-3 and reach the semifinals.
Baseball Briefs
June 7, 2001
Gutierrez leaves game after blow to head Sox put Merloni on DL, recall pitcher Crawford Loewer activated, will pitch for Padres
Red Sox sale expected to set record price
June 7, 2001
Red Sox executives say they will sell the team to the highest bidder even if the new owner wants to move out of Fenway Park. Justin Morreale, a lawyer for the Yawkey Trust, which owns a 53 percent controlling interest in the Red Sox, said Wednesday he expects the Sox to fetch the highest price in baseball history.
Undercover officer finds drug use among students
Teens readily admit using marijuana
June 7, 2001
An undercover police officer who posed as a student for four weeks at Garden City High School found many students who admitted smoking marijuana but saw no drug activity on school grounds, police said.
Hamilton services
June 7, 2001
Rex Shewmake Sr.
June 7, 2001
State armories slated for $22 million in repairs
June 7, 2001
By Scott Rothschild Kansas National Guard armories, including the one in Lawrence, are going to get some needed improvements, officials said Wednesday. State officials approved $2 million in bonds as part of a $22 million plan to repair, renovate and equip 58 armories over the next several years.
CJHS teacher up for national award
June 7, 2001
By Tim Carpenter A Central Junior High School teacher is on the verge of making history. Dari Ashworth is among eight national finalists for the Richard Farrell Teacher of Merit award, which honors an educator’s work with the National History Day program and success at improving history instruction. Winning would be a first for the Lawrence district.
Ashcroft claims death penalty applied fairly
June 7, 2001
There is no evidence that the federal capital punishment system is marred by racial or ethnic bias, the Justice Department said in a study issued Wednesday, less than two weeks before the government is scheduled to put a Hispanic inmate to death.
Lawrence Briefs
June 7, 2001
Car crashes into garage Stroke information program to be offered $1,500 in quarters missing from car wash
Ag panel won’t increase budget to cover overseas child nutrition
June 7, 2001
Republicans on Wednesday blocked the addition of $300 million for hungry children overseas, the first battle over spending caps in their 10-year budget plan. The House agricultural appropriations committee voted 8-7 against adding the extra $300 million to a $74.2 billion spending bill for the Agriculture Department and the Food and Drug Administration.
Budget director to retire
18-year tenure with KU to end for Marlin Rein
June 7, 2001
By Terry Rombeck Marlin Rein, who has overseen Kansas University’s budget and legislative lobbying since 1995, will retire at the end of the year. Rein, who turns 65 in January, has been the university’s director of governmental affairs and budget. He’s prepared the budget for submission to the governor and lobbied for the university in Topeka.
Stovall: Pre-meeting prayer OK
June 7, 2001
The city council that wants to pray together can stay together if members don’t discuss official business. That’s the latest nonbinding legal opinion from Atty. Gen. Carla Stovall.
Auditors credit district policy
Lawrence schools earn high marks for board’s oversight of superintendent’s charge cards
June 7, 2001
By Tim Carpenter The Lawrence school district can take credit for having vigilant oversight of the superintendent’s credit-card expenses. State auditors investigating credit card use by Kansas public school officials found Lawrence was the only district of 16 studied to have adequate provisions for reviewing such purchases by a superintendent.
Topeka backs out of rate settlement talks
June 7, 2001
Topeka Mayor Butch Felker says negotiations between the city and Western Resources are off. “As far as I’m concerned, there is no way to settle at this point,” Felker said Tuesday during a joint meeting of the city council and Shawnee County Commission. Felker caused a stir Monday when he said he’d negotiated a possible deal with Western to support a $70 million rate increase.
Lone Star Lake dredging lags
June 7, 2001
By Joy Ludwig Progress on dredging the southwest arm of Lone Star Lake is not moving along as quickly as Douglas County officials had hoped. The $400,000 project was expected to be complete early this month. But Keith Browning, the county’s director of Public Works, said the contractor met some complications, delaying the project about another month.
KCMO approves new leader for district
June 7, 2001
The school board has approved a contract with Supt. Bernard Taylor Jr. that would last until the district’s deadline to regain state accreditation. Board members approved the 14-month contract 8-1 Tuesday night. The contract is retroactive to April 23, the day Supt. Benjamin Demps Jr. quit, and continues through June 30, 2002.
Kansas athletes post 2.86 GPA, tying school record
June 7, 2001
Seven Kansas University athletics teams posted grade point averages of 3.0 or better during the spring semester. Overall, the athletes’ combined grade point average was 2.86, which ties for the highest departmental average for the athletic department since academic records have been kept.
KC lands Women’s Cup match
June 7, 2001
China, Germany and Japan were invited Wednesday to play the United States in the U.S. Women’s Cup in September. It will be the first US-China meeting in the United States since the Americans won the 1999 Women’s World Cup final.
Williams in golf fund-raiser
June 7, 2001
Kansas basketball coach Roy Williams will participate in the second-annual Coaches Vs. Cancer Golf Invitational this weekend in Owings Hills, Md. The event is a fund-raiser for cancer research. Williams is one of more than 100 coaches who raise money for cancer research.
KU’s Del Chiaro drafted
June 7, 2001
Kansas University senior catcher Brent Del Chiaro has been drafted by the Anaheim Angels. Del Chiaro, who was taken in the 41st round, hit .237 last season with 10 doubles and 26 RBIs. The native of Oakley, Calif., was the 1,229th overall pick of the draft.
KU’s Hilgenkamp on all-star squad
June 7, 2001
Kansas University senior-to-be KC Hilgenkamp was selected to play on the Big 12 Conference Women’s Basketball All-Star team that will tour Austria and Germany in August.
Michigan Little Leaguer more than merely perfect
June 7, 2001
Little League pitcher Robert Knight’s game was perfect and then some: Not only did he pitch a perfect game, but he struck out all 18 batters. “I could tell the other team didn’t really want to come up to bat anymore after a while,” said the 5-foot-3, 100-pound Knight.
Royals hammer Chisox
Change in batting order sparks KC to 12-6 win
June 7, 2001
A small tweak in the batting order sure did enliven Kansas City’s slumbering offense. After Endy Chavez switched from ninth to leadoff and just about everybody else dropped down one spot in the lineup, the Royals erupted for a 12-6 victory over Chicago on Wednesday night, with Mike Sweeney hitting two homers and driving in five runs.
NBA Finals: 76ers work OT to end Lakers’ streak
June 7, 2001
There won’t be a sweep in the NBA Finals unless it’s the 76ers not the Lakers who can pull one off. In a thrilling opener to the championship round, Allen Iverson had a mesmerizing first half, a poor second half and a clutch overtime, scoring 48 points to lead Philadelphia to a 107-101 victory Wednesday night.
C. Pat Liebert
June 7, 2001
Glenn Lawrence
June 7, 2001
Officials investigating gun-toting motorists
June 7, 2001
Lawrence Police and Douglas County Sheriff’s officers are investigating recent incidents involving car occupants pointing weapons at other motorists. About 10:35 p.m. Tuesday a man driving a black Jeep Cherokee pulled alongside a car at the intersection of 15th Street and Wakarusa Drive and the driver pointed a handgun at the other car, a police report said.
Lawrence airport expansion to begin this summer
June 7, 2001
By Joel Mathis Expansion of Lawrence Municipal Airport is about to take off. City and airport officials described the details of expansion Wednesday in a public meeting that included about two dozen pilots, businessmen and owners of land near the airport.
White House rebuffed on global warming
June 7, 2001
The National Academy of Sciences rejected Bush administration skepticism about global warming, declaring Wednesday that it was a real problem caused at least in part by man-made pollution that could well have a “serious adverse” impact by the end of the century.
Heart cells capable of self-repair
June 7, 2001
Research has revealed that heart muscle regenerates to some extent after a heart attack, which contradicts the prevailing view and suggests a new strategy for treating the country’s leading cause of death.
Mathis to sit six months
Torn knee ligament shelves U.S. soccer team standout
June 7, 2001
Even before playing Ecuador, the U.S. soccer team lost: Clint Mathis, the Americans’ hottest player, was diagnosed with a torn knee ligament Wednesday and will be sidelined for the rest of World Cup qualifying.
Old Home Town - 25, 40, and 100 years ago today
June 7, 2001
No concern
June 7, 2001
Pool prices
June 7, 2001
Arc still at work
June 7, 2001
Short Stuff
Children listen, so why won’t dads talk about drugs?
June 7, 2001
Father’s Day is a time when families focus on the importance of a father’s guidance and his place in the family. Most children say they listen to Dad when it comes to life issues.
How to make wind chimes
June 7, 2001
The melodious sound of these wind chimes will say “Thanks” every time a spring breeze rustles the tiny terra-cotta pots. Supplies you need: a plastic lid 5 inches to 7 inches in diameter; five 1.5-inch terra-cotta pots; five 1-inch terra-cotta pots; clear acrylic spray paint; a pushpin; string; five small jingle bells; 11 buttons; and decorative buttons, rubber stamps or stickers.
Collisions kill two, injure several
June 7, 2001
By Mike Belt Two people died and several were injured in area traffic crashes Tuesday and early Wednesday. Though there were several crashes during Tuesday’s rainy weather, officials said none was weather related.
World Briefs
June 7, 2001
France: World’s oldest woman dies at age 115 Lebanon: Muslim edict issued against smoking
Kansas hostage reportedly injured in rebel shootout
June 7, 2001
The Philippine military must stop chasing guerrillas through the jungles of Basilan island if it wants to discuss the release of hostages, a Muslim rebel leader said Wednesday in his first public comments in days.
Russia vows to accept world’s nuclear waste
June 7, 2001
Defying public opinion and an outcry from environmentalists, legislators Wednesday approved laws that would allow Russia to import an estimated 22,000 tons of spent nuclear fuel from nations eager to get rid of their toxic waste.
Writers overwhelmingly approve new contract
June 7, 2001
Hollywood writers voted 9-1 in favor of a new contract that sets aside $41 million for pay raises to the 11,000-member Writers Guild of America over the next three years.
Movie’s fake money passed as real cash
June 7, 2001
The Secret Service wants moviemakers to return bogus money that looks so genuine some people are spending it.
Coalition to appeal oil drilling permit
June 7, 2001
A coalition of American Indian tribes and environmental groups said Wednesday it would try to overturn a federal permit allowing oil drilling in a pristine Montana valley sacred to American Indians.
Lucent offering buyouts
Firm expects to save $10 million annually
June 7, 2001
Struggling telecommunications giant Lucent Technologies Inc. is offering voluntary buyouts to more than 10,000 U.S. employees. Employees targeted for the offer mostly middle-level managers but also some nonunion clerical workers will be notified Monday, said Bill Price, a spokesman for Murray Hill-based Lucent. All the employees either are eligible or nearly eligible for pensions.
Take a number: Bidders line up for today’s event
June 7, 2001
Bidders registered for today’s auction of properties owned by Farmers Cooperative Assn., the Lawrence-based co-op that filed for bankruptcy protection:
Word of Mouth: Desert blossom
Marisco’s excels at seafood and Southwestern cuisine
June 7, 2001
By Diane Frook With all the new office construction along Wakarusa Drive, I’ve been worried about where all those added workers are going to eat. The last thing we need is a dentist or, heaven forbid, a stockbroker suffering from low blood sugar. There’s always McDonald’s, but I wouldn’t wish a restaurant full of kids fresh from class at the Lawrence Gymnastics Academy even on a broker.
Barfly on the wall
Lawrence poet Jason Ryberg puts observation into his work
June 7, 2001
By Mitchell J. Near Jason Ryberg likes to party, often carousing into the early morning hours. But he may be the only person in town who actually does it for a constructive reason. Ryberg is a poet, and he’s fascinated by the way people talk. So he goes to the clubs and the bars and the coffeehouses where the glasses clank and slips of conversation form a steady hum of noise. But to Ryberg’s ear it’s not noise, it’s potential material.
Out of Bounds: One more barrier
June 7, 2001
By Seth Jones It was April 15, 1947, when the first African-American professional baseball player, Jackie Robinson, ran from the dugout onto a major-league field. Since that momentous moment in sports history, all types of minorities have been welcomed into major-league baseball.
Rattle and hum
Australia’s Powderfinger runs into the open arms of America
June 7, 2001
By Geoff Harkness You’ve achieved success that would make most rockers green with envy. Your band’s most recent album debuted at No. 1 and is currently five-times platinum. Your group has also received numerous industry awards and appeared on the cover of Rolling Stone as “Band of the Year.” You’re finding it increasingly difficult to hit the pubs without being besieged by fans looking for photos and autographs. The phone rings nonstop and offers of worldwide tours start pouring in.
Co-op awaits auction
Property sales to cut into $25 million debt
June 7, 2001
By Mark Fagan Marty Moore will be there. So, too, will be Lawrence developer Duane Schwada, Overland Park property investor Robert Laing and Baldwin farmers Carl and Velma Flory. But when Farmers Cooperative Assn. offers its grain elevators, office buildings and other properties during today’s bankruptcy auction, some of the biggest names in agriculture are expected to be absent.
Exclusive Online Profile: Judi Geer Kellas
Photography has moved from being a tool to being essential subject matter in painter’s work
June 7, 2001
By Michael Newman Judi Geer Kellas is contemplating suggestions that she show her photographs. And while that hasn’t happened yet, it wouldn’t be a surprising step in the evolution of her work. Photography is an integral part of her paintings. Quite often, the artist paints from drawings derived from photographs she’s taken. Kellas considers these photographs sketches, of a sort.
Parting shot
June 7, 2001
Nation Briefs
June 7, 2001
Arizona: Surrogate mom delivers quadruplets MIAMI: Wrecking crew wrecks wrong house Texas: Texas A&M president to leave top job
Nation Briefs
June 7, 2001
WASHINGTON, D.C.: Missile defense funding hiked BALTIMORE: Summer school attendance up Florida: Retrial frees murder suspect Vermont: Ex-student wins hazing case
National briefs
June 7, 2001
Arizona: Immigrants offered jobs, housing for testimony Washington: Empty city hall raked by gunfire Ohio: Meningitis cases have same bacteria strain
Arts Notes
June 7, 2001
Sci-fi devotees gather for fest Zoo seeking entries in photo contest Old-time crafts at heart of festival ‘Coffee, Conversation’ set for Friday
Dodging victory
After promising start, Dodge has yet to earn a win
June 7, 2001
It was an expensive and risky undertaking, bringing a manufacturer back into the Winston Cup series. Dodge, however, was determined to succeed. The car and engine had to be designed and built from scratch. The program, announced in October 1999, allowed 500 days to be prepared to run at the season opener at Daytona in February 2001.
National League Roundup: Wood shuts down Cards
Cubs club three homers, win for 14th time in 15 games
June 7, 2001
If this was an “off” day for Kerry Wood, the Cubs will take it. Wood took a no-hit bid into the sixth inning and Sammy Sosa homered to lead Chicago over St. Louis 4-1 Wednesday, the Cubs’ 14th win in 15 games.
Alma Peek
June 7, 2001
City hall veteran elected LA mayor
June 7, 2001
Shaking off the sharp rhetoric of the mayoral campaign, City Attorney James Hahn vowed Wednesday to focus immediately on beefing up the Los Angeles Police Department and increasing the number of after-school programs at the city’s elementary schools.
Smoker wins $3 billion in damages
June 7, 2001
A jury Wednesday awarded a cancer-stricken smoker more than $3 billion from tobacco giant Philip Morris, the largest judgment against a cigarette maker in a lawsuit brought by an individual.
Baldwin eyes 3 energy options
June 7, 2001
By Joy Ludwig As air-conditioning season approaches, Baldwin residents may have some concerns about keeping cool. The city’s utility plant is nearing its maximum capacity for electricity, which is 10,150 kilowatts in the summer.
Tax cuts disappoint conservatives
June 7, 2001
President Bush’s tax cut plan faced fierce attacks from Democrats as it made its way through Congress in record speed. But, as the president signs the legislation at the White House today, the most surprising aspect about his achievement is the disappointment the final product has spawned among conservative tax cut advocates.
Menninger: Move taking longer than expected
June 7, 2001
By Dave Ranney Not a day goes by that Menninger spokesman Roger Verdon doesn’t get a phone call from someone a reporter, usually who’s heard the prestigious clinic’s pending move to Houston is in trouble.
Gratitude, respect fill memorial site
June 7, 2001
Like low thunder the applause rolled across the memorial plaza, building as the boys of Normandy got slowly to their feet, gray-haired now, some leaning on canes or the shoulders of friends.
State briefs
June 7, 2001
Wichita: Diocese settles with abuse victim Kansas City, Kan.: Olathe resident faces counterfeiting charge Kansas City, Kan.: County to move Ten Commandments Wichita: Autopsy shows father drunk in fatal crash
Restaurant robbery case in jury’s hands
June 7, 2001
By Mike Belt A man charged late last year with trying to rob a Lawrence restaurant attempted Wednesday to convince a jury that he was elsewhere that night, checking out night clubs and playing Nintendo.
Bush allows negotiations with N. Korea
June 7, 2001
With a major policy review completed, President Bush on Wednesday ordered his foreign policy team to resume security negotiations with North Korea on a long list of other U.S. concerns about the authoritarian regime.
Stability is key to U.S. policy
June 7, 2001
By Trudy Rubin The Philadelphia Inquirer Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld has a most peculiar view of how America should exercise its role as global leader.
Are drinking laws rational?
June 7, 2001
By Geneva Overholser Washington Post Writers Group A noteworthy aspect of the Bush twins’ unlawful brushes with alcohol is the explanation given by many as to why the press should go easy on them: It’s not fair to mercilessly expose the president’s daughters for doing what’s virtually a rite of passage among American youth.
Swordfish’ unlikely to hook moviegoers
June 7, 2001
Swordfish is best served grilled, brushed with olive oil and seasoned with a buttery citrus sauce. Dished out as an explosive heist movie starring John Travolta, “Swordfish” goes belly up.
MTV awards pinpoint new stars
June 7, 2001
The often irreverent and always silly MTV Movie Awards (8 p.m., MTV) celebrates its 10th anniversary with plenty of special guests and musical performances. Expect musical numbers from the Dave Matthews Band, Weezer and a congregation including Li’l Kim, Mya, Pink and Christina Aguilera singing the old Patti LaBelle hit “Lady Marmalade.”
Carving a friendship
Lessons are mutual for senior instructor, students
June 7, 2001
By Jim Baker When Pete Lawson started carving wood as a hobby in the 1970s, the young people with whom he recently worked weren’t even born. But there didn’t seem to be any evidence of a generation gap between Lawson, 80, and the teen-age pupils he taught the finer points of his pastime this past semester at Central Junior High School.
Gary Coleman waylaid by fame
Diminutive child star wants nothing to do with former TV series
June 7, 2001
Gary Coleman is a corporate shill. This is what he does with his fame, which he hates. He uses it to promote corporations, which he loves.
13-year-old daughter doesn’t belong on guys’ fishing trip
June 7, 2001
Horoscopes
June 7, 2001
Film Review - ‘Panic’
Panic’ puts a fresh twist on the link between killers and psychologists
June 7, 2001
By Loey Lockerby A criminal, in the throes of an existential crisis, turns to a therapist for help. Sound familiar? With the success of “Analyze This” and “The Sopranos,” the pairing of killers and psychologists has almost become passe. With “Panic,” writer-director Henry Bromell takes this unoriginal premise and turns it into something truly unique.
Film Review - ‘Swordfish’
Computer geek-themed ‘Swordfish’ doesn’t quite hack it as an action thriller
June 7, 2001
By Dan Lybarger With a few keystrokes, cyber crooks can steal fortunes and ruin people’s lives. Because of the amount of damage hackers can cause, movies about them don’t have to be boring. Thus the makers of “Swordfish” figured no one wanted to see a flick about tired, disheveled loners tapping at keyboards for hours on end.
What Are You Reading?
June 7, 2001
No commitments
The Evaporated Milk Society debuts play about messianic figure
June 7, 2001
By Mitchell J. Near Randall Cohn might best be described as a man who makes order from disorder, and who makes the incomprehensible readily understandable. But he’s keen on experimental theater, so maybe that’s just an edge one develops when working in a performance zone most people view as “out there.”
American League Roundup: Tribe trips Twins with Alomar’s triple
June 7, 2001
If Cleveland was going to catch Minnesota in the AL Central during the first series between the division leaders, it figured to be with the bats. A boost from the bullpen was just as big.
Nuclear waste site rules unveiled
June 7, 2001
The Bush administration agreed to tougher health protection requirements for a proposed nuclear waste site in Nevada, ignoring pleas from the nuclear industry and Republican allies in Congress.
In the swim
June 7, 2001
Journal-World Editorial The new Lawrence Indoor Aquatic Center has something for everyone. It’s hard to imagine anything that is missing from the new Lawrence Indoor Aquatic Center at 4706 Overland Dr.
Missing sailor returns after attack
June 7, 2001
A missing U.S. Navy lieutenant who hid on the slopes of a volcano during an attack by suspected communist guerrillas turned up late Wednesday at an air base, hungry but uninjured.
Hewlett-Packard says slowdown spreading
Firm ‘cautious’ with revenue forecast
June 7, 2001
Hewlett-Packard Co. said Wednesday that it now expects the slowdown in information-technology spending to spread into Asia and Latin America, reinforcing the computer maker’s conviction that the slowdown is global.
National Briefs
June 7, 2001
San Francisco: Parking plan closes famous winding street NEW YORK CITY: Mom pleads innocent to 1980 kidnapping WASHINGTON, D.C.: Investigation under way into Corps river project
On the record
June 7, 2001
GOP ends six-year run as Senate’s majority party
June 7, 2001
Ending the six-year Republican monopoly on power in Congress, Democrats Wednesday took charge of the Senate in a remarkably smooth transition that belied the bumpy road ahead as they mount a more aggressive opposition to President Bush.
Sale of Western could be sweet for top executives
June 7, 2001
By Scott Rothschild Top executives of Western Resources Inc. could receive tens of millions of dollars after they sell the company’s KPL and KGE utilities, according to documents filed with the federal Securities and Exchange Commission.
County caught in redistricting pendulum
June 7, 2001
Some southeast Kansas residents including some affected the most don’t mind having their region split between two congressional districts, legislators learned. At issue is the composition of the state’s four congressional districts, which are to be redrawn by legislators in coming months. Because of shifts in population toward urban areas, current boundaries are likely to change.
Father, son survive
Wilsons make cut; Stewart, Marshall No. 1
June 7, 2001
By Andy Samuelson Frustration hadn’t set in yet, but concern was evident on the face of Spencer Wilson Wednesday as his tee shot on the fifth hole at Alvamar sailed into the trees on the far left side of the fairway.
Red flag in Pontiac 400 leaves us with unanswerable question
June 7, 2001
Without NASCAR’s intervention, Dale Jarrett would not be leading the Winston Cup standings by 14 points. He might still be the points leader had it not been for what happened near the end of Saturday night’s Pontiac 400 at Richmond International Raceway. Or he might not.
Style Briefs
June 7, 2001
Next on the runway Lauren’s luring site
Smells drive canine car custom
But hanging out the window can be doggone dangerous
June 7, 2001
It’s an icon of road travel. You’ve seen it repeatedly. You’re driving down the highway on a warm, sunny day, and you spot a dog in another car, lolling out the open window. The dog’s ears flap in the breeze, and the expression on the dog’s face suggests that sticking its nose in the wind is the canine equivalent of heaven.
Business Briefcase
June 7, 2001
Merger mania: Foreign investment in U.S. sets record Economy: Federal Reserve member says slowdown isn’t over Acquisition: GE seeks EU approval of merger with Honeywell DaimlerChrysler: Discrimination lawsuit filed against automaker Pharmaceuticals: Bristol-Myers seeks to buy DuPont business Transportation: Amtrak to use station as collateral Packaging: Huhtamaki: One name fits all U.S. operations Leadership: Seaboard names new president
Daily Ticker
June 7, 2001
Almost famous
Alkaline Trio’s chemistry is mixed for punk success
June 7, 2001
By Geoff Harkness Being part of an almost-famous punk rock group is no easy task, even for bands looking to venture into the limelight.
Permanently Staind
Massachusetts melodic metal outfit finds that you can never go home again
June 7, 2001
By Geoff Harkness Staind could arguably be called America’s most popular band right now, but the members are trying not to let it bother them. The Springfield, Mass., quartet currently is in the unique and precarious position of having both the No. 1 album and the No. 1 song in the country. The album, “Break the Cycle,” is a 50-minute melodic metal fest chronicling the ups and downs of being thrust into the glare of the national spotlight.
TOP MUSIC
June 7, 2001
Roger Bryan
June 7, 2001
Brown mellows throughout years
Philadelphia coach realizes players are individuals, not robots
June 7, 2001
There were no drumsticks and stuffing in Kevin Ollie’s future on the day before Thanksgiving 1999. A 26-year-old resident of Los Angeles, and a veteran of the Continental Basketball Association and four other NBA teams, Ollie had only recently joined the 76ers.
6Sports report: third Kansas baseballer drafted
June 7, 2001
Kansas University catcher Brent Del Chiaro was selected by the Anaheim Angels in the 41st round on Wednesday. Del Chiaro was the 1,229th pick overall.
McVeigh stay denied; ruling draws appeal
June 7, 2001
The federal judge who presided over Timothy McVeigh’s trial refused Wednesday to delay the execution of the convicted Oklahoma City bomber, saying there is “no good cause” to postpone carrying out next Monday’s death sentence.
Friends and neighbors
June 7, 2001
Arizona loses pinch-hitter
June 7, 2001
Arizona placed pinch-hit specialist Greg Colbrunn on the 15-day disabled list on Wednesday because of a bone bruise in his left knee. Catcher Chad Moeller was recalled from Triple-A Tucson to take Colbrunn’s spot on the roster.
Raytheon Aircraft to lay off more Kansas workers
June 7, 2001
Blaming lower-than-expected production rates for its planes, Raytheon Aircraft Co. said Wednesday it would lay off 470 hourly employees in Kansas. Employee notices will begin later this month and continue through the year. The reduction comes in addition to the 450 salaried administrative and managerial jobs that the company said in April it would cut in Wichita and Salina as a pre-emptive move in a soft economy.
Letters
June 7, 2001
Washington now belongs to Bush
June 7, 2001
By David Shribman The Boston Globe Lawmakers from both parties returned to the capital this week for the first session of the newly Democratic Senate. But they found that they were returning to a city that, for the first time, was truly George W. Bush’s Washington.
Briefly
June 7, 2001
Carothers named interim associate provost James B. Carothers, a Kansas University English professor, will serve as interim associate provost. Carothers will fill the position while Associate Provost Kathleen McCluskey-Fawcett serves as interim dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Carothers will oversee academic services such as new student orientation, the registrar’s office, the Freshman/Sophomore Advising Center and the Writing Center. He has held many administrative positions at KU since 1970, including associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, acting director of the Honors Program and president of University Council. He is a William Faulkner scholar and teaches classes in the modern American novel and American humor. He wrote “William Faulkner’s Short Stories” in 1985, as well as short fiction and articles and reviews on modern fiction, American humorists, and baseball in literature. __________________________ Philanthropy: Community foundation taps executive director Sara Corless, Lawrence, has become the first executive director of the Douglas County Community Foundation. Her work will be to encourage support of existing charities and to form new charities. She also will work with the foundation’s board of directors to make direct charitable and educational grants in Douglas County. Corless has 15 years of experience working with nonprofit organizations. She recently served as first executive director of the Lawrence Schools Foundation. According to Corless, her initial goal is to raise awareness of the Douglas County Community Foundation and its potential for improving lives, especially the needs of youths in Douglas County. The foundation, created last year, distributed more than $200,000 in grants to Douglas County organizations last December. For more information about the foundation, call 843-8727. __________________________ Memories: Journal-World wants your flood stories, photos This July is the 50th anniversary of the flood that devastated North Lawrence and much of the region. The Journal-World is planning a commemorative edition marking the anniversary of the flood of 1951, and wants to include stories and photographs from its readers in the special issue. If you have an interesting story and/or photo, please contact the Journal-World by June 15. All photos mailed or dropped off at the newspaper offices with a self-addressed envelope will be returned. There are several ways to be included: mail your entries to Flood Tab, 609 N.H., Lawrence 66044; e-mail stories to Special Sections Editor Amy Trollinger at atrollinger@ljworld.com; or fax stories to Trollinger’s attention at 843-4512. For more information or questions, please call Trollinger at 832-7254. __________________________ Gasoline prices: Pump patrol at work The Journal-World has found a Lawrence-area gasoline price as low as: $1.56.9 a gallon at Miller Mart at 19th Street and Haskell Avenue. If you find a lower price, please call us at 832-7154. Be prepared to leave the name of the business, the address and the price. Or go to www.ljworld.com/section/gasoline to join our Pump Patrol message board with your gas price information. __________________________ Downtown: ‘Bag it’ for lunch, concert The first in a series of weekly Brown Bag Concerts takes place at noon today outside the Mercantile Bank building, 900 Mass. The Billy Spears Band plays today in the free summer series, which is sponsored by the Lawrence Parks and Recreation Department.
Movie Listings
June 7, 2001
Calendar
June 7, 2001