Archive for Sunday, January 19, 1992

Also from January 19

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VALLEY VIEW VOTE
January 19, 1992
To the editor: I cannot believe what I read in the paper recently!
NEWEST BANKS HEAT UP RIVALRY IN LOCAL MARKET
January 19, 1992
Bankers who’ve set up shop in Lawrence in recent years say the gamble to cash in on the city’s growth has paid off. “I think it has met or exceeded our expectations,” Todd Sutherland, president of The University National Bank, said of the Lawrence market.
COMMODITY IN PIONEER DAYS
January 19, 1992
Stalled automobiles, burst water pipes and over-eager spring daffodils top the list of contemporary concerns triggered by cold waves. A hundred years ago, arctic winds brought different woes as well as the annual opportunity to harvest ice from the river.
PLAYWRIGHT WRITES LIFE INTO NONREALISTIC PLAYS
January 19, 1992
They say it’s difficult making a living at playwriting, but it’s living that makes a playwright. Or so says Constance Congdon. “As a playwright, you do need to be involved in life,” said Congdon, whose play “Tales of the Lost Formicans” opens Friday at the Lawrence Community Theatre. “It keeps you in touch with the audience, and it’s life you’re writing about. Life includes people. You draw on the people you live with, your family, and you can’t be like Jackson Pollock and be in your own work. The art of the theater is very difficult.”
FAMILY PRACTICE TARGET
January 19, 1992
Someone should tell the Kansas Legislature’s Joint Committee on Health Care Decisions for the 1990s that you catch more flies with sugar than with salt. Meeting after the close of the 1991 legislative session, the committee members came up with an idea they believed would entice the Kansas University Medical Center to churn out more family practice doctors. Their plan was to cut the KUMC budget if at least 5 percent of its graduates don’t enter its family practice training program.
GARY WILLIAMS
January 19, 1992
Services for Gary V. Williams, 61, Lawrence, will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Rumsey Funeral Home with the Rev. Ron Goodman officiating. Burial will be at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday at Leavenworth National Cemetery with military honors. Mr. Williams died Friday, Jan. 17, 1992, at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Topeka.
KUMC RECEIVES WESLEY GRANT FOR PROGRAMS
January 19, 1992
The Kansas University Medical Center has received a two-year grant for $136,753 from the Wesley Foundation to bolster programs in health promotion and disease prevention. The department of preventive medicine is changing its emphasis from diagnosis and treatment to health promotion and disease prevention with the help of the grant. Initial changes will target the KU School of Medicine at both its Kansas City, Kan., and Wichita sites.
FROM HORNS TO BATONS WITH BARRY TUCKWELL
January 19, 1992
Barry Tuckwell divides his time between the horn and the baton. On the French horn, he’s one of the world’s best. With the baton, he’s led some excellent orchestras, including Britain’s Northern Sinfonia. “I don’t organize my schedule so that I’m playing 50 percent solo and 50 percent conducting, but it works out that way,” said Tuckwell, who will bring the Northern Sinfonia chamber orchestra on Friday to Lawrence. “I just naturally evolved into conducting. About 20 years ago I conducted for Andre Previn. I hadn’t conducted a professional orchestra before, although I had led a number of school orchestras. But I started then, and it took off from that point.”
WOODLING COLUMN
January 19, 1992
Notes and quotes… Notes and quotes while wondering if the Big Eight has ever considered merging with the Mid-American Conference and becoming the Big MAC… Reportedly Kansas already has verbal commitments for most of its available football scholarships with the national signing date still 2 weeks away. Coach Glen Mason has only 15 to 18 grants available. If Mason signed the maximum of 25, he’d go over the NCAA’s 95-scholarship limit…
S HEALTH CARE
January 19, 1992
Easy access to health care in Russia is overshadowed by a shortage of almost all medical supplies, said a Lawrence doctor and nurse who recently spent two weeks in Russia studying the country’s medical system. Dr. Wayne Tilson, a specialist in emergency and internal medicine, and Lori Heacock, a registered nurse in the Lawrence School District, traveled to the former Soviet Union with a group from Illinois State University in Normal, Ill.
WILLIAM PENNY
January 19, 1992
Services for William H. Penny, 72, Lawrence, will be 2 p.m. Monday at First United Methodist Church with the Rev. Virgil Brady officiating. Burial will be at Memorial Park Cemetery. Mr. Penny died Saturday, Jan. 18, 1992, at his home.
PRE-EMPTIVE STRIKE
January 19, 1992
Gov. Joan Finney’s pre-emptive action to allow casino gambling on the Kickapoo Indian reservation doesn’t set a promising tone for cooperation between the governor’s office and the 1992 Kansas Legislature. Despite an attorney general’s opinion saying that any compact to allow gambling on the reservation requires legislative approval, Finney chose Thursday to unilaterally sign a compact with the Kickapoo Indian Nation and give the tribe the go-ahead to set up a casino just west of Horton within 30 days.
DONALD A. GORDON
January 19, 1992
Services for Donald A. Gordon, 76, Lyford, Tex., will be held at 10 a.m. Monday at the Perry Christian Church. The Rev. Larry Wright will officiate. Burial will be at Oak Ridge Cemetery here. Mr. Gordon died Wednesday, Jan. 15, 1992, at his home. He was born June 14, 1915, at Lecompton, the son of William and Katherine Goepfert Gordon.
ELEANOR MURPHY
January 19, 1992
Services for Eleanor Murphy, 94, Lawrence, will be 1:30 p.m. Tuesday at Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence with the Rev. J.C. Ford officiating. Ms. Murphy died Saturday, Jan. 18, 1992, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
ENERGY PROGRAM CUTS MEAN FEWER AIDED
January 19, 1992
When state programs are cut, officials usually point to fiscal woes. But the director of community services at Douglas County Senior Services is beginning to think that answer isn’t good enough. Sandy Strand, who works with local senior citizens, is especially concerned about cuts to the Low Income Energy Assistance Program, which is federally funded and administered through the state Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services.
PRAEGER WANTS ACCESS TO CLINICS ASSURED
January 19, 1992
Rep. Sandy Praeger has co-sponsored a bill introduced this session that would establish criminal penalties for blocking access to health clinics where abortions are performed. The bill’s key sponsor is Rep. Wanda Fuller, R-Wichita. Fuller’s bill is promoted by pro-abortion forces who were upset that access to a health clinic was blocked this summer during abortion protests in Wichita.
COLORADO DESERVES CREDIT — WALTERS
January 19, 1992
For a while there, Kansas couldn’t have bought a field goal if it owned a key to Fort Knox. “But we didn’t have much time to put our heads down and sulk,” KU guard Rex Walters said, “because Colorado came right back up our tails.”
LEADER
January 19, 1992
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. worked not only for blacks but for all Americans and prepared the country for the future, a minister who worked with King during the 1960s civil rights movement said during a celebration Saturday evening. The Rev. C.T. Vivian, Chicago, said all Americans are better off because of King, who was assassinated in 1968. Cities across the nation are celebrating King’s contributions to the United States this weekend. The official holiday marking King’s legacy is Monday.
COMMISSIONERS CONTINUE JOB OF REDISTRICTING
January 19, 1992
The Douglas County Commission on Monday will take its second stab at carving up the county’s three commission districts as part of reapportionment following the 1990 census. Last Monday, the commissioners presented four plans for consideration for redistricting. No agreement was reached.
HANDY ON WINNING RELAY IN RETURN TO TRACK
January 19, 1992
Jon Handy was as anxious as anyone to get back on the track in Kansas’ indoor opener. Handy came to KU from Kismet in 1989, bringing with him 10 Class 2A state track titles he won during his career at Southwestern Heights High.
200 MARCH TO PROTEST ABORTION
January 19, 1992
Carrying signs and pushing empty baby carriages, a crowd of more than 200 people took control of the west lane of Massachusetts Street under the noon sun Saturday to protest abortion. “We’re out here to commemorate the 1973 Roe vs. Wade decision,” said Pat Moriarty, president of Lawrence Kansans For Life, referring to the landmark Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion. “Thirty million unborn babies have died since 1973.”
FOR THE RECORD
January 19, 1992
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
NEWCOMER GETS WIN, SALE AT ART SHOW
January 19, 1992
When Rob Dunlap entered “Imagery and Form ‘92,” the juried exhibit held by the Lawrence Art Guild Assn., he thought he’d be lucky just to be accepted. Little did he know. His two-panel collage won first prize, and the juror, noted Kansas City artist Dean Mitchell, bought the piece.
A PLAY FROM THE FORMICAN ZONE
January 19, 1992
Consider, if you will, a community theater stage. A family experiences trauma. A group of aliens, who wear sunglasses, watches. An audience laughs. This is not “The Twilight Zone.” This is “Tales of the Lost Formicans.” It’s in a dimension of sight, sound and mind a dimension known as the theater.
MEETING FOR PEACE LISTS OUTSTANDING CREDITORS
January 19, 1992
The Meeting for Peace, an October 1990 event that brought about 290 Soviet citizens to Lawrence and other Kansas cities, had a total cost of $725,808, according to a foundation financial report released this week. The following is a breakdown of the $34,074.54 in remaining debts to creditors, as of Jan. 15, for the 1990 event:
CALIFORNIA LABEL PRODUCES NO-FRILLS RECORDINGS
January 19, 1992
The Fantasy-Prestige-Milestone-Contemporary group continues as one of the most dependable purveyors of honest, no-frills, straight-from-the-heart jazz. Eschewing gimmicks, fads and heavy-handed production, the Berkeley, Calif.,-based family of labels kicks the new year off with a quartet of great dates headed by tenor titan Sonny Rollins. HERE’S TO THE PEOPLE, Sonny Rollins (Milestone MCD-9194-2): Rollins, the 61-year-old “Saxophone Colossus,” along with John Coltrane and Stan Getz one of the three most influential post-World War Two tenor saxophonists, forges ahead with another compelling session laced with wit, wisdom and kind of weltschmerz whose angst is tempered with affability, and even affection for the quixotic aspects of the human condition.
HOSPITAL REPORT
January 19, 1992
BIRTHS Tom and Diane Bracciano, Lawrence, a girl, Saturday.
KANSAS WOMEN CLAIM 66-48 WIN OVER BUFFS
January 19, 1992
Kansas University’s defense, ranked No. 1 in the country in points allowed per game, slipped a bit during the Jayhawks’ recent women’s basketball slump. Marian Washington reminded her team of that fact before KU’s 66-48 win over Colorado on Saturday afternoon at Allen Fieldhouse.
January 19, 1992
Regardless whether they were hopeful or fearful, “apprehensive” is how Dr. Wayne Tilson and nurse Lori Heacock described Russians’ attitudes about social, political and economic upheaval in their country. “Some felt they would weather this like they weathered the changes in World War II,” Tilson said. “Then there were others who were very pessimistic, feeling the whole place is coming apart, it’s disintegrating, it’s going to be the end here.”
S EFFORTS SHIFT TO DEBTS
January 19, 1992
A local group whose goal was to bring down barriers between the United States and the former Soviet Union has turned its efforts toward dismantling a tower of debts it racked up in the process. With debts forgiven by several creditors in the past few weeks, the non-profit Meeting For Peace Foundation has been able to eliminate nearly $40,000 in red ink to reduce its total debt to $56,079, according to a former foundation officer.
JAYHAWKS SQUEEZE PAST CU, 81-80
January 19, 1992
Maybe Kansas will become the first college basketball team endorsed by the American Heart Assn. Kansas made it two ticker-testers in a row with an 81-80 victory over Colorado on Saturday night in the Coors Events Center.
NON-INDIAN FACULTY FIND THEIR NICHE TEACHING AT HASKELL
January 19, 1992
One of several non-Indian faculty members at Haskell Indian Junior College, Chuck Haines enjoys teaching at the school because of the opportunity to learn something new every day about Native American cultures and traditions. “It’s kind of like a little U.N. here,” he said.
LOCAL CONTINGENT TO INDIAN MEETING HOPES FOR CHANGES
January 19, 1992
As a parent and a grandmother, Marilyn Bread hopes real change will come from next week’s White House Conference on Indian Education. Change has to be made for children, said Bread, education development specialist at Haskell Indian Junior College and president of the Kansas Association for Native American Education.