Advertisement

Archive for Friday, July 15, 2011

Area FBI agents investigating 2nd bank robbery in two days, this time in Ottawa

July 15, 2011, 1:37 p.m. Updated July 15, 2011, 2:57 p.m.

Advertisement

This photo shows the suspect involved in robbing Great Southern Bank in Ottawa. The bank was robbed at approximately 10:05 a.m. Friday, July 15, 2011.

This photo shows the suspect involved in robbing Great Southern Bank in Ottawa. The bank was robbed at approximately 10:05 a.m. Friday, July 15, 2011.

This photo shows the suspect involved in robbing Great Southern Bank in Ottawa. The bank was robbed at approximately 10:05 a.m. Friday, July 15, 2011.

This photo shows the suspect involved in robbing Great Southern Bank in Ottawa. The bank was robbed at approximately 10:05 a.m. Friday, July 15, 2011.

This photo shows the truck used by the suspect in the July 15, 2011, robbery at Great Southern Bank in Ottawa. The truck was described as a 1970s or 1980s red Toyota or Nissan pick-up truck, with rust on the passenger side bed.

This photo shows the truck used by the suspect in the July 15, 2011, robbery at Great Southern Bank in Ottawa. The truck was described as a 1970s or 1980s red Toyota or Nissan pick-up truck, with rust on the passenger side bed.

FBI agents are investigating a bank robbery reported Friday morning in Ottawa.

Bridget Patton, an FBI spokeswoman in Kansas City, said the robbery was reported at 10:10 a.m. at Great Southern Bank, 2040 South Princeton St.

A man gave the teller a note demanding cash and threatened the teller with a weapon, although no weapon was shown, she said. No one was injured.

Patton described the suspect as a white male with a goatee, brown hair, thin build, in his mid-30s, 5 feet 7 inches to 6 feet tall. He wore a camouflage ball cap, dark plaid shirt with a brown T-shirt underneath that had an unknown design on the chest and dirty blue jeans.

The suspect fled the bank’s property in an older model red pickup truck. A white female with dirty blonde hair was in the passenger seat, witnesses said, and the truck was headed toward Interstate 35. Ottawa police described the truck as a 1970s to 1980s model Nissan or Toyota.

It is the second area bank robbery investigation for the FBI in two days after a man walked into Central National Bank, 603 W. Ninth St., Thursday afternoon in Lawrence and demanded money from tellers before receiving cash and leaving the bank on foot south on Louisiana Street. No one was injured.

Patton said the Lawrence suspect had his hand in his pocket indicating he had a weapon, but no weapon was shown.

Lawrence police describe the suspect as a white male, in his mid-20s, about 6 feet tall, with brown hair, wearing a green cap, blue jeans and a black zip-up coat.

Patton said it was too early to tell if the Lawrence and Ottawa robberies are connected.

“We always look to see if there’s any type of connection,” she said.

Bank robbery is typically a federal crime because nearly all banks and credit unions are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.

Anyone with information in either case is asked to call the FBI at 1-816-512-8200.

Comments

50YearResident 3 years, 2 months ago

I can't believe it's so easy to rob a bank now. It doesn't matter what a guy is holding onto with his right hand in his pocket. The bank will pay not to see it!

0

Currahee 3 years, 2 months ago

I want to see you try and rob a bank if you think it's so easy. If you think someone has the possibility of shooting you, I'd be scared too.

0

gatekeeper 3 years, 2 months ago

My husband has been in banking for over 20 years. The only smart and safe thing to do is just give them what they want and get them out of the bank with no one getting hurt. The small amount of money they can get in a robbery isn't worth the life of any employees. It doesn't matter if they show weapons or not. And sometimes, they do have weapons. I'm lucky my husband wasn't killed years ago because he was robbed when he was a teller and it was at gunpoint.

No matter what, the employees lives are the most valuable thing in any bank and money isn't.

0

Blessed4x 3 years, 2 months ago

Bank robber escapes with a few thousand dollars from the cash drawer OR bank robber shoots employee, depriving the company of a good employee/person. Employees family sues bank for 50 gagillion dollars which still doesn't bring back the dead employee. Hmmm...as a business I know which one I would rather have happen no matter how slim the chances that the latter would come to be.

0

RugerLCP 3 years, 2 months ago

I won't comment on this one, several people got a little defensive last time...

0

pizzapete 3 years, 2 months ago

That guy looks different than the Lawrence robber. With the goatee, dirty blue jeans, camo hat, and truck waiting outside, he's going to be hard to find in Ottawa.

0

50YearResident 3 years, 2 months ago

Just looked at the pictures captured from this robbery and this is my post on the picture comments. Wow! A great picture, for the first time. There is no way this guy is going to get away. That profile would be a dead giveaway to anyone that has ever met this idiot. Between the picture of him and his truck I predict he will be caught within 24 hours. If all survailiance pictures were this clear more crooks would be caught. Better cameras is the answer, and place them looking at every customer at the teller windows.

0

Eride 3 years, 2 months ago

It would be smarter to rob a liqueur store. The prison sentence for robbing a bank is much more harsh, authorities place a lot more resources into finding bank robbers, banks have a lot more security measures in place to catch robbers after the fact, and the amount of money recovered from robbing a liquor store could even be more then a teller's drawer. Rational people don't rob banks. Confronting crazy people who are robbing a bank is a good way to get hurt.

50YearResident: Yes, I am sure if you were a teller you would be perfectly happy telling a potentially armed robber (who most likely isn't in his/her right mind since they are stupid enough to rob a bank) to bugger off instead of handing him the money. There is no bank that has a policy like that. Banks employ a myriad assortment of methods at preventing loss and helping law enforcement find the thieves if a robbery does occur. Including keeping cash levels in a teller drawer to the lowest level possible, bait traps, cameras, etc. Imagine the liability if a bank had a policy of its employees telling robbers no and an employee got shot? The risk of an insured loss of a few thousand dollars versus a wrongful death suit of millions?

Keep telling yourself that tellers should just stick their neck out on the line for a few thousand dollars of insured money. We both know you wouldn't do that yourself.

0

50YearResident 3 years, 2 months ago

I didn't say that I would tell a robber to pis* off. However there are passive methods of preventing this type of robber, a single individule entering the bank alone. Any bank could do this. Build a glass enclosed entryway to the bank about 20 feet long and 6' wide. Make it air conditioned and use bullet proof glass. Put automatic door locks on both doors, the outside door and the lobby entry door. The locks can be activated from multiple locations inside the bank. When a robber comes in and the teller gives him the money all that has to be done is wait until he exits the lobby door. Then activate the door locks, trapping the robber inside the entryway. Call the police and they will come and remove the robber. Case closed.

0

Joe Hyde 3 years, 2 months ago

Some architect ought to design a new bank building whose main entry features a long vestibule outfitted with a pair of drop-down doors composed of bulletproof glass. The robber enters the vestibule on his way out, the doors drop and bingo, he just got live-trapped. Can't get out, can't shoot his way out.

0

Alabamastreet 3 years, 2 months ago

The net effect on the robber would be similar to the feeling most people get when reading the LJWorld comments like those above.

0

Commenting has been disabled for this item.