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Archive for Friday, June 4, 2010

State, Iowa tribe sign memorandum on license plates

June 4, 2010, 1:48 p.m. Updated June 4, 2010, 1:52 p.m.

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 Leaders of the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska gave Gov. Mark Parkinson a blanket on Friday. Parkinson and the tribal leaders sign an agreement that allows the tribe to issue its own license plates.

Leaders of the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska gave Gov. Mark Parkinson a blanket on Friday. Parkinson and the tribal leaders sign an agreement that allows the tribe to issue its own license plates.

— Gov. Mark Parkinson and leaders of the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska on Friday signed an agreement that will allow the tribe to issue its own license plates.

The memorandum of understanding allows the tribe to issue license plates and titles for vehicles owned by members of the tribe who live on the tribe’s reservation within the state.

Under the agreement, the tribe will transmit to the state ownership and registration information for each vehicle it registers so that the information will be in the state’s motor vehicle database.

Comments

Jeremy 4 years, 6 months ago

Exactly, ...and not pay state personal property taxes on vehicles.

Clark Coan 4 years, 6 months ago

It's fun to look at all of the Indian tribal plates at Haskell when it is in session.

Mike Ford 4 years, 6 months ago

for the non-Indians here, the tribe issues the plates and generates the tax revenue for the tribe. In order to quell the eventual stupidity that will insue, Supreme Court Justice John Marshall in Worcester V. Georgia, ruled that Indian tribes are sovereign to govern themselves through membership, land ownership, and the issuing of tribal tags and the collection of tribal taxes from tribal members on tribal lands held in trust by the federal government. These trust lands are outside the jurisdiction of local and state officials unless there have been laws passed by the U.S. Congress with plenary power perscribed in the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution that say differently. It's amazing how little of an empirical arguement there is once the uneducated have been educated. The ruling I stated was made in 1832.

Zachary Stoltenberg 4 years, 6 months ago

This is why when stolen cars are found on the reservation, the owner can't take them back and the police or state can't prosecute. Do something illegal? Hightail it back to the rez!

Jeremy 4 years, 6 months ago

If the trust lands are outside the jurisdiction of local and state officials how come their roads and other infrastructure are built and maintined by US and state taxes?

So, now the tribe can stop accepting US and state monies because of their soverignty.

Interesting.

Mike Ford 4 years, 6 months ago

actually Jeremy their roads and infrastructure are funded by treaty monies that the U.S. Government holds in treasury accounts or by appropriations passed by the U.S. Congress since they have plenary powers as prescribed in the U.S. Constitution over Indian Affairs. Tribes like the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation fund their roads and signage in the Potawatomi language with gaming earnings that they also set aside in accounts to accrue interest for minors who are tribal members and they also like many tribes provide elderly housing and services for tribal members. In a largely innaccurate article about Indian Gaming done by Time Magaizne, the Kansas Potawatomis were shown as a success through gaming by funding their own fire department on their reservation. Any non-Indian entity who builds roads or buildings on trust lands must first make it past Indian preference and a bidding process to do work with the tribe and the BIA and the U.S. Government. Actually, real statements are interesting.

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