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Archive for Tuesday, February 2, 2010

Another environmental group signs on to effort to stop rail yard in southwest Johnson County

February 2, 2010

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— The Natural Resources Defense Council has joined efforts to stop construction of a large rail yard project in southwest Johnson County.

The environmental group filed a lawsuit Monday contending that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers did not adequately evaluate the environmental effects of the project. It claims the project would cause substantial air pollution for the entire region.

The Kansas City Star reports that the corps has issued a permit to BNSF Railway to build a nearly 500-acre rail hub about 30 miles south of Kansas City. The railroad’s plans include a facility where freight arriving on trains would be transferred to trucks.

A private developer would build a warehouse complex nearby.

The NRDC and other critics want the corps to conduct a more thorough environmental investigation.

Comments

Godot 4 years, 2 months ago

The greenies are just extorting more dough from Buffet.

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swan_diver 4 years, 2 months ago

The intermodal phenomenon is about one thing, beyond the blow to our traditional ports and dock-workers. It's about bringing in countless billions of dollars in worthless, poorly-made, toxic consumer crap from overseas, where foreign workers are producing it for almost nothing, under dangerous conditions -- while what's left of American manufacturing lays off the slim remainder of its workforce. All you self-righteous neo-fascist con-artists on these local LJW boards are working to destroy America, by spreading lies and misrepresentations. Stop pretending to give a damn about the nation and its citizens.

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del888 4 years, 2 months ago

Umm, no. Freight comes in on the west coast, gets put on rails, and rolls across the country, being dropped off at strategic points along the way.

That's how it saves money. If it wasn't for the rail, trucks would have to haul the freight to the midwest. Your assessment that the freight is 'coming up from Mexico' where it will be put on rail is WRONG. It is being sent to the midwest via the train, then put on trucks to deliver throughtout the midwest. I have picked up freight at intermodal sites and most of them make it illegal to idle your truck. When you pull onto the lot, you have to park and shut off the engine.

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gccs14r 4 years, 2 months ago

"This rail hub will take literally thousands of trucks off the road and save millions of gallons of fuel."

Umm, no. Freight comes in on the west coast, gets put on rails, and rolls across the country, being dropped off at strategic points along the way. Trucks take it from there. The intermodal adds another trucking leg, by bringing freight up from Mexico, where it will be put on rails, then sent both directions to strategic points, where it will then be carried by trucks to the final destination. Tell me how putting all Pacific Rim inbound freight on trucks in Mexico and driving it to Kansas City is going to save a drop of fuel. The whole purpose of the intermodal is to break the west coast dockworkers union.

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Danimal 4 years, 2 months ago

Environmentalists have tipped their hand again that they are opposed to any new development. This rail hub will take literally thousands of trucks off the road and save millions of gallons of fuel.
Environmentalists in the greater Kansas City area will whine about anything they think might remotely impact air quality. If they were really that concerned with idling trucks and air quality, the environmentalists would have seen to it that the SLT was finished years ago. They know that they can complain and hold things up on any project just by saying the Army Corps of Engineers didn't do a thorough enough study.

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gccs14r 4 years, 2 months ago

Not to mention that these are going to be primarily Mexican trucks, not American ones.

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meggers 4 years, 2 months ago

I believe the main concern is actually with the trucks. When you get that many trucks idling in one concentrated area, the envonmental impact may much more significant than they originally anticipated or disclosed. Not to mention the added noise and air pollution that will impact surrounding areas from the trucks coming and going.

While intermodals do tend to decrease overall truck traffic by relying heavily on rail and providing one central location for loading and unloading materials, there is still the question of finding an area that can accommodate such a high level of pollution. From what I understand, the Corps of Engineers did not sufficiently study the air quality impact before green-lighting the project. Given that, they shouldn't be surprised to find their decision being challenged by environmental groups.

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classclown 4 years, 2 months ago

I thought they were supposed to be building this hub over by Richards-Gebaur. I was under the assumption that was in the works a few years ago.

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imastinker 4 years, 2 months ago

That's just what I was going to say!!

I'll bet rail traffic uses a tenth the natural resources per lb moved that using a truck does.

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justanothertroll 4 years, 2 months ago

I thought that railroads were suppose to be the green alternative to truck traffic, what's up tree huggers?

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