Archive for Saturday, April 4, 2009

Milk labeling requirement sent to governor

April 4, 2009

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— Ben & Jerry’s ice cream may be unavailable in Kansas if legislation restricting dairy labels is put into law, a state legislator said Friday.

State Rep. Josh Svaty, D-Ellsworth, who opposed the bill, warned House members they may face some angry constituents.

They will ask, Svaty said, “What happened to Ben and Jerry’s ice cream? Why did you take that away from us?”

But supporters of the bill said food companies will have no trouble complying with the law.

Under the measure, producers who state their product is not from cows supplemented with the artificial growth hormone rBST would have to document the claim and put on the product label a disclaimer that the federal government has determined that rBST makes no difference.

Large dairy producers say it is misleading to brag about being hormone-free because there is no evidence linking the hormones given to cows with any problems in milk or other dairy products.

But opponents say some people want to know whether hormones are used because they believe it could either adversely affect the quality of the milk or the health of the cow.

The bill has been approved by both the House and Senate and now goes to Gov. Kathleen Sebelius for consideration.

Comments

Jennifer Dropkin 6 years, 3 months ago

Under this law, milk producers and food companies that use artificial growth hormone or such treated milk are not required to state that they use it, but milk producers and food companies who don't use it and say so will have to prove that they don't use it.

The burden of proof is unbalanced, and consumers in the state of Kansas are being hoodwinked. We have the right to know what's being put in our food. Why are our legislators going along with this?

repaste 6 years, 3 months ago

What happened to the thread pre-8:30? Gilly, you'r right this law is a crime, written by corrupt politicians.

repaste 6 years, 3 months ago

What happened to the thread pre-8:30? Gilly, you're right. this law is a crime, written by corrupt politicians.

repaste 6 years, 3 months ago

Urinal world having its issues. Why does it take 1 min per page to load?

Melinda Black 6 years, 3 months ago

I find it curious that Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the European Union don't allow rBST use. I wonder if the companies that manufacture artificial growth hormones have been too busy lobbying the politicians in the U.S. to push their agenda internationally.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 6 years, 3 months ago

"Large dairy producers say it is misleading to brag about being hormone-free because there is no evidence linking the hormones given to cows with any problems in milk or other dairy products."

To my knowledge, no one on their labels say that the hormones are harmful, merely that the cows weren't given them. How is this misleading?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 6 years, 3 months ago

"Urinal world having its issues. Why does it take 1 min per page to load?"

The JW is among the slowest loading sites I visit.

getreal 6 years, 3 months ago

All those so-called "free market" elected officials who voted for this legislation are simply answering to a higher power, big business and their lobbyists.

Who would have thought dairy labeling might be the next campaign issue, but I would be willing to bet if Ben and Jerry's isn't on the shelf there will be some officials who aren't in their seats next year.

Don't mess with people's ICE CREAM!

Frank Smith 6 years, 3 months ago

This requirement is right out of George Orwell's "Ministry of Truth."

kansastruthteller 6 years, 3 months ago

"This requirement is right out of George Orwell's “Ministry of Truth.”

How so? Have you read the bill? Do you want false or misleading labeling to be allowed?

It is one thing to have a marketing nich based on quality, taste, etc., but entirely a different one when it is based on misleading or false information.

Disclaimers are often required on products - never noticed those statements, "these results have not been verified by FDA" or "these results not typical?"

introversion 6 years, 3 months ago

No, but I believe that it is a basic responsibility of a producer to provide as much information about their product as they can. If milk producers really believe that there's nothing wrong with rBGH, then they shouldn't have any problem putting it on their label. As our labeling is so messed up and companies that don't use it are being pressured to not include that on their label, the consumer still has a right to know.

The bottom line is that the producers who use it are embarrassed and don't want to lose money over it.

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