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Archive for Saturday, January 6, 2001

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Kansas topples Texas Tech, 94-82
January 6, 2001
(Updated Saturday at 9:55 p.m.) Kansas beat Texas Tech, 94-82, Saturday night in Lubbock in Big 12 men’s conference play.
London doctor cited for mass murder
Physician may have killed hundreds under his care
January 6, 2001
In 25 years of suburban practice, Dr. Harold Shipman gained a reputation as a hands-on physician so dedicated that he often stopped by his patients’ homes between appointments.
Women’s top 25
Louisiana Tech rolls
January 6, 2001
Louisiana Tech had bigger things to worry about than beating yet another conference foe Friday night.
National Geographic takes cable channel full-time
January 6, 2001
If that teetering stack of National Geographic magazines in your attic could talk, it might need its own television channel. Guess what? No longer content just to hand out research grants, publish a 9 million-circulation journal and produce the occasional Jane Goodall special, the National Geographic Society is rolling out its own full-time cable TV channel.
KU men hit road for Raiders
Texas Tech, Kansas have ‘wild’ history
January 6, 2001
By Gary Bedore Texas Tech hopes the power of positive thinking works tonight against No. 7-ranked Kansas. The unranked, lightly-regarded Red Raiders (6-5), who lost nine straight games to open the Big 12 season last year en route to a 3-13 league record, will begin the 2001 conference campaign against the No. 7 Jayhawks (11-1).
Pioneers drop FSHS
KU signee Simien scores game-high 17
January 6, 2001
By Robert Sinclair The score of the Leavenworth-Free State High boys basketball game Friday night seemed more like the score of a football game. And that was just at halftime. The No. 1-ranked Pioneers were playing with a purpose, bolting to a 22-point lead by intermission and cruising to a 70-40 Sunflower League victory at the LHS gym.
Piano tuner not hindered by blindness
January 6, 2001
By Scott Rothschild Working methodically, Loren Buntemeyer mutes one string and with a tuning hammer adjusts another on a piano in one of the faculty studios in Murphy Hall. “A piano has more moving parts than a Volkswagen,” Buntemeyer says.
Horoscopes
January 6, 2001
Daily Ticker
January 6, 2001
Business Briefcase
January 6, 2001
Bluefin tuna sells for $175,000 at auction LEGISLATURE: New chairman wants review of Tyson-IPB merger Agriculture: Sale barns, ranchers want vote on beef checkoff Retailer: Borders expects earnings to fall in fourth quarter
ConAgra fire hurts other businesses
Firms lay off workers in wake of closing
January 6, 2001
The closing of ConAgra’s plant has had a ripple effect on other businesses in the area, which are laying off people and considering ways to respond if the plant does not reopen.
Senators must reject Ashcroft
January 6, 2001
By Mark Shields Creators Syndicate “Warren Harding,” wisely observed George B. Christian Jr., who was the Ohio Republican’s principal assistant, “didn’t like being a senator; he liked being in the Senate.”
Research ties
January 6, 2001
Journal-World Editorial Legislators and farmers are asking questions about who benefits most from research under way at Kansas State University. It probably isn’t the first time this question has entered the minds of Kansas farmers, but a professor’s comments this week about research at Kansas State University has put that question on the state’s legislative agenda.
World Briefs
January 6, 2001
Nigeria: Teen girl to be flogged for premarital sex ROME: U.S. Embassy closed after threat received Uzbekistan: Travel agents charged with human organ sales Caribbean: Homosexuality decriminalized
Small mountain town copes with 4 killings in week
January 6, 2001
Four people were killed this week in two unrelated shootings in a quiet mountain hamlet of 50 residents. The slayings came as a shock to residents who don’t remember a homicide ever occurring in the bedroom ski resort community, which has a few log cabins, antiques stores and a general store.
Wild caribou play reindeer games
Alaska farmers losing herds
January 6, 2001
Reindeer farmers have seen thousands of their animals run off with wild caribou herds, prompting state officials to seek federal disaster money. The Western Arctic caribou herd, which has grown to more than 400,000 animals, is spreading across the Seward Peninsula, encroaching on herders’ lands where reindeer graze freely. Herders say once the reindeer mix with their wild cousins, they don’t come back.
NFL briefs
January 6, 2001
Lions hire Millen as president, GM Ex-Jet Gastineau returned to jail Several Broncos slated for surgery Titans’ facility suffers damage Former Bears coach Snyder dies at 87 St. Louis hires April San Diego names Butler general manager Steelers tab Mularkey Vikes want stadium Neilson fights cancer Indians to ink Gonzalez Man hurt at stadium Justice has surgery Magadan takes cut Bosox pick up pitchers
Around and about
January 6, 2001
People
January 6, 2001
Teen actor given probation Mel sheds hero label Seinfeld wins court appeal Mutual admiration society
Clinton issuing last-minute edicts
January 6, 2001
For now, President-elect George W. Bush can do little but watch as President Clinton orders last-minute changes big and small from protecting millions of federal acres to changing the presidential license plates to promote statehood for Washington, D.C. “He has been a busy beaver,” Bush spokesman Ari Fleischer said Friday, promising a review of “each and every one” of Clinton’s orders once Bush takes office.
Loss to Wake taught lesson
January 6, 2001
By Bill Mayer The Kansas basketball team got butchered at Wake Forest and though it didn’t seem that way at the time, KU got at least two benefits from the 84-53 humiliation.
Lions end drought with rout
Lawrence High pulls away from emotionally charged Bulldogs
January 6, 2001
By Steve Rottinghaus Lawrence High does remember how to win. Four weeks and two losses since their last victory, the Lions rolled to a 57-33 boys basketball win over emotionally charged Kansas City Wyandotte on Friday night in the Bulldogs’ gym.
Nation Briefs
January 6, 2001
North Dakota: Patients’ deaths blamed on mouthwash New Jersey: Web site to be used for child visitation WASHINGTON, D.C.: FBI, businesses team to fight computer crime Denver: Reno approves newspaper merger
Nation briefs
January 6, 2001
Judge: College not required to re-admit anorexic student Supreme Court rejects last Florida vote cases Police officer suspended for forcing women to disrobe Evidence against VA nurse dropped for math mistakes
Nation briefs
January 6, 2001
Bandleader Les Brown dies at age 88 Gun makers drop government lawsuit Husband shoots rape suspect Teen briefly holds classmates hostage
Fugitives lead Texas lawmen on huge manhunt
January 6, 2001
The search for seven violent, heavily armed fugitives from an audacious prison escape near San Antonio last month has grown into one of the biggest, most urgent manhunts in the Southwest since lawmen tracked Bonnie and Clyde on the Depression-era Texas plains, authorities said.
Bank employee throws hat in commission ring
January 6, 2001
By Joel Mathis Craig Campbell announced his candidacy for Lawrence City Commission Friday, saying like other candidates that the most important issue is growth.
Senate agrees to share power
January 6, 2001
Using the new muscle they gained in last November’s elections, Democrats won important concessions from Republicans on Friday for running the first 100-seat Senate to be split evenly between the parties.
Cunningham axed; Vermeil wants to coach Chiefs
January 6, 2001
Gunther Cunningham was fired Friday after two lackluster seasons as coach of the Kansas City Chiefs, who want Dick Vermeil as his replacement. They might have to wait to hire Vermeil, who led St. Louis to last year’s Super Bowl title, then retired. Vermeil said Friday he wanted to coach the Chiefs, but the Rams still have him under contract and have shown no willingness to release him.
Would McCain switch for ‘04?
January 6, 2001
By Jack Anderson and Douglas Cohn United Feature Syndicate Who will be the Democratic presidential nominee in 2004? “Who cares so soon?” you may wonder. Read on.
Nebraska license plate books disappearing
January 6, 2001
In the glove compartments or under the seats of many pickup trucks and cars throughout rural Nebraska is a worn booklet that some drivers find as useful as any map. It’s a directory that lists the license plate numbers and names of county residents.
NHL Roundup
Pens fall, 4-3
January 6, 2001
The Pittsburgh Penguins won’t go undefeated with Mario Lemieux in the lineup after all.
Roundup
Sixers silence Sonics
January 6, 2001
The Seattle SuperSonics have internal troubles again, just like they had earlier this season when coach Paul Westphal was fired.
State briefs
January 6, 2001
Suicide jumper kills truck driver Brothers charged in cellist’s murder March, ceremony to mark King birthday Allen named publisher of The Morning Sun New admissions to nursing home banned Medal of Honor plates to be issued Police investigating evidence room theft
Pioneers stop Free State girls
Leavenworth posts 50-43 win in league opener for both teams
January 6, 2001
By Robert Sinclair Despite the recent warming trend outside, Free State High’s girls basketball team’s scoring went cold on Friday night. The Firebirds scored a mere two points during a span of 12 minutes, 55 seconds, and Leavenworth capitalized with a 50-43 victory in the Sunflower League opener for both teams at the LHS gym.
Unbeaten Baylor first league foe for KU women
January 6, 2001
By Andrew Hartsock Kansas University’s women’s basketball team isn’t exactly surging into the second season. The Jayhawks, who have lost two straight and four of their last five, will play host to undefeated Baylor today in Kansas’ Big 12 opener. Tipoff is 2:05 p.m. at Allen Fieldhouse.
Clinton revamps Mideast goals: get Israelis, Palestinians talking
January 6, 2001
President Clinton has given up on trying to conclude an Israeli-Palestinian peace deal before he leaves office Jan. 20, Israeli and Palestinian officials said Friday. Instead, the president has lowered his sights and is working on just getting the parties back to the bargaining table in an effort to prevent the 3-month-old spasm of violence from escalating out of control.
Banker, advocate for arts center, dies at age 90
George Ryan warmly remembered
January 6, 2001
By Erwin Seba A local banker instrumental in the establishment of the Lawrence Arts Center died Jan. 3 at his son’s home in Austin, Tex. Friends and colleagues recall George H. Ryan, 90, as a careful businessman who gave a lot to his community.
Two chances to catch Newhart
January 6, 2001
Fans of Bob Newhart’s deadpan delivery are in for a double treat. The rumpled comedian co-stars with Kelsey Grammer in the first of two light-hearted sports fantasies featured in the cable movie, “The Sports Pages” (7 p.m., Sunday, Showtime).
Resolutions to add caring, kindness to the new year
January 6, 2001
Nation briefs
January 6, 2001
Racial shooting case reinstated Reward offered for Rwanda criminals Brain surgeon’s license restored New oversight board to monitor state secrets Chicken to be labeled with water content
Harsh winter harms region’s birds of prey
January 6, 2001
So the recent blast of wintry weather made it a little harder to get to the supermarket? At least grocery stores, even if slightly less accessible, provide a ready supply of food for those who can get there.
Betty Clair
January 6, 2001
NHL Briefs
January 6, 2001
Foote out three months Ray appeal progresses Hogue rejoins Stars
Nets’ forward Van Horn expected to return tonight
January 6, 2001
New Jersey Nets forward Keith Van Horn, sidelined since breaking his left leg in a preseason game, was activated Friday and is expected to play tonight against Golden State.
Lawrence briefs
January 6, 2001
Ottawa school board to meet Monday Child care workers, parents taught first aid Welfare reform discussion to look at consequences Board to meet Monday
On the record
January 6, 2001
Ever wonder why main street called Massachusetts?
January 6, 2001
One could argue that Lawrence was formed in Massachusetts. In April 1854, Eli Thayer, a member of the Massachusetts Legislature, proposed that the Kansas Territory be populated by free men “who hated slavery and who would drive the hideous thing from the broad and beautiful plains where they were going to raise free homes.”
Mrs. Bush unveils inaugural gown
January 6, 2001
Laura Bush will be the Lady in Red at the inaugural balls Jan. 20. She chose a red-scoopneck, embroidered Chantilly-lace gown by Dallas-based designer Michael Faircloth, according to Women’s Wear Daily.
Clinton to award 28 Citizens Medals
January 6, 2001
President Clinton is honoring 28 Americans, from baseball slugger Hank Aaron to actress Elizabeth Taylor, for answering “America’s highest calling” of service to their country, the White House announced Friday.
Harsh, early winter one for the record books
January 6, 2001
The suspicions of millions of shivering Americans were confirmed Friday by government weather experts it was the nation’s coldest November-December period. “Two months in a row of much below-average temperatures resulted in the coldest November-December U.S. temperature on record, 33.8 degrees Fahrenheit,” said Jay Lawrimore, chief of the Climate Monitoring Branch at the National Climatic Data Center. This broke the old record of 34.2, set in 1898.
Party planners get jump on city’s 150th
January 6, 2001
By Katie Hollar A downtown pavilion. A footbridge from behind Johnny’s Tavern to Burcham Park. A 2004 presidential debate. Those are just some of the ideas kicked around by the group planning a grand 150th birthday bash for Lawrence when the day comes in 2004. The date is three years away, but the Sesquicentennial Commission is already busy brainstorming.
City knocking at county doors
Annexation necessary for road improvements
January 6, 2001
By Joel Mathis Twelve years ago, D.D. Schaake fled the city for a little country living. Now the city’s following. Tuesday night, Lawrence city commissioners will consider starting a process that would annex a wide swath of property along Sixth Street from Wakarusa Drive to Kansas Highway 10.
Oz’ creator tattoos series with ideas
Tom Fontana plans new religious theme for this year’s shows
January 6, 2001
Tom Fontana lives with souvenirs from TV series he has brought to life. In a corner of his office stands the marble statue (really fiberglass and hollow) of St. Eligius, rescued from the California sound stage where it graced the set of his 1980s hospital drama “St. Elsewhere.”
Offensive shirt conviction overturned
January 6, 2001
A woman who strolled around a town festival in a Marilyn Manson T-shirt, then was convicted of harassment because of its nasty language, won a reversal Friday from the Kentucky Court of Appeals.
Janet Jackson’s ex threatens to write tell-all book
January 6, 2001
Rene Elizondo, the soon-to-be ex-husband of pop superstar Janet Jackson, is threatening to write a book that would include times, dates and places about her alleged affairs with women, Planetout.com reports.
Senator’s son on tap for top judicial job
January 6, 2001
Just two years out of law school, the 28-year-old son of Sen. Strom Thurmond has a virtual lock on the top federal prosecutor’s job in South Carolina, an appointment that essentially rests in his father’s hands.
Tiananmen papers trace crackdown’s responsibility
January 6, 2001
Documents reportedly brought out of China by a disaffected civil servant say that the late Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping ordered the violent Tiananmen Square crackdown after being warned that massive student demonstrations could topple the Communist regime.
California power woes darken
January 6, 2001
California’s power crisis deepened on several fronts Friday, with a utility losing a round in court, President Clinton calling for a high-level meeting and a consumer activist warning of a ratepayer rebellion when the latest bills go out.
California fire contained
January 6, 2001
Firefighters working to contain the last pockets of a blaze that destroyed six homes were feeling a little cooler on Friday as sprinkles of rain fell on Southern California.
Saints, Vikings to tangle today
January 6, 2001
There won’t be many surprises coming out of the huddles of the New Orleans Saints and Minnesota Vikings in today’s NFC playoff game. These are two teams with a history. The Saints and Vikings practiced together for years when New Orleans held its training camp in Wisconsin.
Raiders to meet Miami
Oakland’s defense faces stiff challenge
January 6, 2001
Cornerback Charles Woodson has read the newspapers and heard the buzz: The Oakland Raiders need better defense to win in the playoffs. “There are a lot of people talking about how we have the weakest defense of the teams that are left,” he said.
Military news
January 6, 2001
Club notes
January 6, 2001
Scouting news
January 6, 2001
Raiders recycle winning mystique
Gannon, Rison, others were rejected by various National Football League teams
January 6, 2001
Recycling didn’t even have a name when the Raiders began practicing it during their first tenure in Oakland. Their locker room was the original Island of Misfit Toys. Huddled masses, rip-roaring iconoclasts, the Raiders welcomed anyone who could help them win games.
Engagements
January 6, 2001
Pregnancy angered Carruth
Former girlfriend says NFL player threatened her
January 6, 2001
One of Rae Carruth’s former girlfriends testified Friday that he was furious when she became pregnant by him, threatening her and insisting she have an abortion.
Anniversaries
January 6, 2001
Grabbing a seat on the awards bandwagon
January 6, 2001
The National Board of Review. The Broadcast Film Critics Association. The Golden Globes. The SPCA. NASA. OK, so those last two groups don’t give out film awards (which means “102 Dalmatians” and “Mission to Mars” might go home empty-handed this year).
Study: Blood vessels may be Alzheimer’s link
January 6, 2001
Harmful deposits build up in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients because the brain’s aging blood vessels lose the ability to wash the deposits away, new research in mice suggests.
Class gives smokers a chance to quit
January 6, 2001
By Kim Hall A puff here, a drag there. Does the number of cigarettes you smoke actually make a difference in your health? Dr. Charles Yockey, a pulmonologist with Cotton-O’Neil Clinic in Lawrence, says if you want to reduce the risk of cancer and emphysema you have to stop smoking, not just cut down.
The skinny on strokes
January 6, 2001
Stroke is a cerebrovascular injury that occurs when blood flow to the brain is interrupted by a clogged or burst artery. The interruption deprives the brain of blood and oxygen and causes brain cells to die.
Dora Freed
January 6, 2001
Brain attack
Stroke is the nation’s third-leading killer, yet few people know the warning signs
January 6, 2001
On average, someone in the United States suffers a stroke every 53 seconds. This year, 600,000 Americans will suffer a stroke, and 160,000 of them will die making stroke the country’s third leading cause of death.
Briefly
January 6, 2001
Construction on water line closes campus road Victim in fair condition after two-vehicle collision Alleged scam targets Lawrence pharmacies Open gym offered at schools
City offers traffic solution
Plan aims to appease both sides in Schwarz Road controversy
January 6, 2001
By Joy Ludwig If all goes well, residents who live along Schwarz Road should see less traffic in their section of the Deerfield neighborhood. The city has proposed a plan that would install a temporary blockade and a do-not-enter sign for the northbound lane at the Sixth Street entrance of Schwarz Road. The signs would have a 90-day trial period.
Early arrival right on time
Lawrence’s first baby of the year was born weeks before due date
January 6, 2001
By Joy Ludwig Liam Joseph Peters is Lawrence’s first baby of the third millennium. It wasn’t until the end of the week that his parents were sure he was going to be a healthy baby boy. Born a few weeks premature, he needed a little extra oxygen to help him breathe for the first few days.
Students to pay by the minute
Hours lost to snow will be made up two minutes at a time
January 6, 2001
By Tim Carpenter That third bad weather day will cost Lawrence school district students an extra two minutes, four days a week, for the rest of the school year. Supt. Randy Weseman said he would ask the school board Monday to add 120 seconds to the instructional clock on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. The plan is to skip Wednesday, because all but high school students are released early for teacher collaboration.
Job growth slows in December
January 6, 2001
Job growth nationwide fell to the slowest pace in eight years with auto plants and other factories shedding thousands of workers in December. While the unemployment rate remained frozen at 4 percent, analysts predicted sharply higher numbers in the months ahead as the weak economy forces more layoffs.
New-home sales hit three-month low in November
January 6, 2001
Americans bought fewer new homes in November as stock market volatility, lower consumer confidence and higher energy prices made people feel less inclined to make big purchases.
Stocks fall on buzz of lower earnings
Dow falls 250 points; Nasdaq down 6 percent
January 6, 2001
The slowing economy reasserted itself Friday on Wall Street, sending stocks tumbling and erasing much of the big gains the market enjoyed earlier in the week. Rumors of losses tied to slower economic growth triggered a selloff first in financial stocks and later in high-tech bellwether Cisco Systems. The plunge illustrated how vulnerable the market remains to even a hint of bad news despite its big rally Wednesday on the Federal Reserve’s interest rate cut.
2000 tops charts
Lawrence construction rises to record
January 6, 2001
By Mark Fagan Public projects fueled the city’s most lucrative building year ever. The city issued building permits for $175 million in construction during 2000, up 4.5 percent from the previous record of $167.5 million in 1996, according to a report released Friday at city hall.
Snow-covered roads mean overtime work at Kansas salt mines
January 6, 2001
Salt mine workers in central Kansas have been scrambling since many of the nation’s roads have been covered in ice and snow. The Hutchinson Salt Co. and the Lyons Salt Co. have about all of the work they can handle with the demand for salt skyrocketing because of the harsh, early winter, combined with the closing of two major U.S. salt mines.
Senate’s consent is key to process
January 6, 2001
By Jack Anderson and Douglas Cohn United Feature Syndicate President-elect George W. Bush is making Cabinet nominations, and he will soon be making Supreme Court and lower-court nominations. However, some Democratic senators are already sending unconstitutional signals, saying that the president has the “right” to make “his appointments” and that the Senate should not oppose nominees on ideological grounds.
Old home town - 25, 40, and 100 years ago today
January 6, 2001
Theory intact
January 6, 2001
Doctor cool to breast implants on teen
January 6, 2001
A British teen whose parents promised to give her breast implants as a 16th birthday gift should wait a few more years, says the doctor the family wants to perform the surgery.
U.S. weapons suspected of causing cancer
January 6, 2001
Americans have heard much about Gulf War syndrome, the still-mysterious complex of diseases and health problems that thousands of veterans believe they contracted during Operation Desert Storm in the Persian Gulf. Now, is a Balkan syndrome emerging as well?
AIDS drug combo proves fatal
January 6, 2001
Three pregnant women with the AIDS virus recently died from a severe side effect caused by taking two AIDS drugs together, the government said Friday in warning pregnant women to try to avoid a combination of the drugs ddI and d4T.
Killer shrimp on the loose
January 6, 2001
The SplashZone, a normally tranquil children’s section at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, has become the scene of underwater carnage at the claws of a killer shrimp.
States get more time to spend health funds
Kansas among 39 states that missed deadline for children’s insurance program
January 6, 2001
Thirty-nine states that stood to lose hundreds of millions of dollars for children’s health insurance have been given a reprieve. All states had until the end of the fiscal year in September to use about $4.2 billion that Congress had approved for 1998 for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), but only 11 met the deadline. Those that did not had to forfeit the remaining money to the states that used the money.