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Should you take off your hat for the playing of the National Anthem?

Response Percent Votes
Yes
 
87% 1330
No
 
12% 188
Total 1518

Comments

IDfend4U 3 years, 8 months ago

USA.... Land of the Free, Home of the Brave.

Well, not so much anymore. People have their freedoms (and many of them have taken their 1st Amendment Right to extremes) but I'm not see many Brave anymore. Sad when taking off your hat to show respect is an 'option'.

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booyalab 3 years, 8 months ago

I'm less concerned with removing hats than with turning the performance into an impromptu American Idol audition. Whatever happened to singing something straight?

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overplayedhistory 3 years, 8 months ago

yes, yes lets fill our time doing the left right thing over properly respecting the symbols of the religion while the church itself crumbles.

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Kris_H 3 years, 8 months ago

I respect my country and especially the Constitution on which it is founded. I would rather see people with hats on or not, with hands over hearts or not, even listening to the anthem or not, than I would this faux patriotic jingoism "love it or leave it," "taking back 'my' country," "what has this country come to," etc. etc. etc. that is so prevalant right now.

Respecting my country means I care about what my country does, not only regarding its own citizens but as part of the larger world. Respecting my country means I care enough to point out problems as I see them, not blindly follow the flag no matter where it's being carried, literally and figuratively.

Whether my neigbor has his hat on or not has nothing to do with true respect.

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HedleyLamarrr 3 years, 8 months ago

the next poll should ask "should the city employ individuals that bully others with violence?"

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blindrabbit 3 years, 8 months ago

Clovis: Sounds like you got your knickers in a bind; lighten-up a little and you'll have more fun! The comparison of the National Anthem and Pledge of Allegiance is at first understandable; but the former is patriotic song that is designed to be inspirational; the "Pledge" on the other hand is an oath which is supposed to mean that you obey it's tenants. Lost some of it's meaning for me when "under god" was added years ago.

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jreiling 3 years, 8 months ago

What I am wondering is why it is such an issue that the guy doing the 'battering' is a firefighter? If the guy had chosen a different career path, would he be more/less condemned/supported?

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Isaac McPheeters 3 years, 8 months ago

Unlike many who have given their lives so the flag can continue to fly (and others I know who have put their lives on the line to defend it), the least I can do is take off my hat and salute the flag.

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bobberboy 3 years, 8 months ago

well you had better take it off or maybe someone will knock it off !

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Hydra 3 years, 8 months ago

Should you take off your hat for the playing of the National Anthem? Yes.

Should they forced to or grabbed or threatened if they do not. No!

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hartk678 3 years, 8 months ago

It would be nice if LJW would link the stories which inspired these questions to the online polls.

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SofaKing 3 years, 8 months ago

Free country. We do what we feel like. We obey laws. Firefighters are not meant to enforce patriotism.

If I fail to put a flag on my porch on Veteran's Day, will I get choked by a firefighter?

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kansasmutt 3 years, 8 months ago

What school still lets kids say the Pledge of Allegiance ? I know of none that still alow it or if they do they take god out of it. What school still has the 10 commandments up for kids to see ? This country was founded on christian ways, i am not a church person, but with all the BS about , no god this no christmas tree, all the plitical corectness is BS. Owh and for my spellin, i dont kare how i spell, im not worried about it on here. (From above) " "" . I can live a similar lifestyle in 20 other countries (at least) and make similar contributions."" Move to one of them and see how free you are. granted, we americans have lost 70% of our freedoms, but it is better than most any other country.Well, it was before the last 3 years anyway, now it kinda sucks.

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ShePrecedes 3 years, 8 months ago

I am just not feeling that patriotic these days. Don't know which god we are supposed to pledge under. And that heart-swell I used to get upon singing the national anthem no longer happens. While born and raised in this state, this country, I am not happy with the government since and during Bush. Can't really find a reason to be proud of it now.

Thus, ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyQ2UF...

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Graczyk 3 years, 8 months ago

Why pledge allegiance to anything? Does the country have the same allegiance to you? I'm not being a troll, I'm asking a serious question. I'm hoping get something a little better than the "people died for your freedoms" response because that is rarely true anymore about the U.S.'s armed conflicts abroad. Sure, people are dying, but I doubt it's for my "freedom."

I think about it like a business deal. It is currently mutually advantageous for me to live in the U.S.. The country gets my productivity and taxes, and I get a nice place to live. Should that balance change, however, I see no reason to pledge allegiance to the U.S.. I can live a similar lifestyle in 20 other countries (at least) and make similar contributions.

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Practicality 3 years, 8 months ago

Kiera is back with a Blog! Might stay in tonight!

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beatrice 3 years, 8 months ago

Should we? Yes. Should we have to? Absolutely not.

It makes me think of the whole flag-burning issue. By making sure someone has the right to burn the flag, it takes away much if not all of meaning intended from the actual act of burning that flag. Try doing it in a place where the law says you can't, then that is saying something. Demanding that someone take their hat off, stand at attention, put hand on heart at the playing of a song -- that is the type of thing you find in places like North Korea.

Fortunately, we aren't North Korea. Here in America, you do it because you want to, not because you are forced to. How perfect is that for a nation that enjoys its freedom?

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pace 3 years, 8 months ago

I don't know. My friend is kind of bald and using medication making him sun sensitive. He needs to be shaded. One graduation afternoon did him some harm. In the hot afternoon he should just put his hand over his heart and keep his hat on. Also for those folks who think everyone should stand, some people just don't have the knees. Don't assume or presume. Don't shame someone for attending a kid's event and not participating in the physical way you want. It really isn't your business. People should not have to explain physical or medical issues to strangers, even to friends.

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clovis_sangrail 3 years, 8 months ago

I'll stand when the national anthem is played, but that is mostly so I don't have to look at the ass of the person in front of me.

As for saluting, or taking off a hat, or putting my hand over my heart -- Get real. That's someone else's prayer, not mine, and someone else's pseudo-god.

When I was a cop a long time ago, some little martinet of a captain decided we all needed to salute the flag at sporting events. I usually made it a point just to be out of line of sight of the flag when the anthem was played, but when I couldn't escape it, I gave it my best two-fingered Cub Scout salute. That order was eventually rescinded.

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jrlii 3 years, 8 months ago

I was taught forty-odd years ago that:

A.) Civilian Male: Stand and take your hat off if worn and hold it over your heart with your right hand. Otherwise place your right hand over your heart.

B.) Civilian Female: Stand and place your right hand over your heart, whether or not you are wearing a hat.

C.) Military personnel in uniform: Come to attention and salute.

D.) Military personnel in civvies: Follow rule A or B as appropriate.

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Multidisciplinary 3 years, 8 months ago

I can SO see this happening. Many kids with mental retardation/Developmental Disabilities form attachments to something. Often it can be something soothing, a toy, a favorite piece of clothing, such as a favorite color bib, shirt..or their favorite hat/hats. They can become literally emotionally glued to an object, or type of object to the point they scream bloody murder if it leaves their sight, is taken off, missing.

Now, imagine the scenario..family with disabled child is honored with free tickets to some sport event. Or say they're ill, and it's Make-A-Wish night for them. They get full camera coverage, up on the big screen. The music begins to play, and there they are, in their wheelchair, or just assigned seats...with that child NOT removing their hat, no parent or caregiver making a move to do so. Perhaps if they are physically able, they place their hand on their chest, look at the flag...but the hat stays in place. The parents may have never taken the child anywhere to have this situation come up before, never thought about it..they were just tickled pink their child got to attend!

Would people be as ticked off? Would they be standing around commenting that no one removed that child's hat? What if he or she was a cancer patient with no hair, a young child embarrassed still at their new baldness?

How about a bandana or scarf on a woman with cancer's head? Thus goes..a man's? Is a bandana okay on a man's head? Cancer or not? Just what is the difference between a bandana, hat, ball cap....

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mr_right_wing 3 years, 8 months ago

I've accepted this one as a lost cause...

You hardly ever see anyone under age 60 taking off their hat for the National Anthem.

As archaic as it sounds, in the distant past men always removed their hats before entering a building.

You are also supposed to put your hand over your heart as well, but i usually only see about 50% of the people doing that.

We are so incredibly spoiled in this country and we're getting really good at disrespecting it. This is the greatest country in the world, and I am proud and privileged to live within its boarders.

our presidents respect for the flag/pledge/national anthem... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hU9iCA...

Mr. Right Wings 995th Piece of Wisdom from the right!

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beatrice 3 years, 8 months ago

Depends. Which country's national anthem are we talking about?

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Tracy Rogers 3 years, 8 months ago

Stupid question. Of course you take your hat off during the National Anthem. Is society that far gone that these is even a debatable question?

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Mary Sucha 3 years, 8 months ago

I wouldn't be surprised to see this issue in the next election. Constitutional amendments in all the states requiring males to remove their hats, hoods, etc., when the national anthem is played. Another way to pander about patriotism.

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ivalueamerica 3 years, 8 months ago

To remove your hat and put your hand over your heart for the flag, to me, should NEVER be an obligation, it is a privelage.

In Peru, come independence day, you MUST fly a Peruvian flag over your home, or you can get a fine from the local government.

I applaud and support patriotism, but it should come from the heart, not by obligation or it looses all meaning.

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meggers 3 years, 8 months ago

The more appropriate poll question would be "Is it acceptable to accost someone for not removing their hat at the playing of the National Anthem?

Most people agree that it's proper decorum to remove one's hat while the anthem is played. That certainly doesn't mean that most people find it acceptable to go around policing those who forget to do so, those who just don't know any better, or those who know the etiquette, but prefer to leave their hat on, anyway. The irony is that when we pay respect to the flag and the National Anthem, we are largely saluting the freedom that accompanies them. That includes the freedom to decline participation in patriotic rituals.

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Practicality 3 years, 8 months ago

I am curious as to the origins of the entire "hat removal as a sign of respect" gesture.

I haven't found anything concrete as to its formation, but I have found some references to medevil times with knights having to remove their hats in the presence of the King as a sign of obediance and deference to him, as well as to show the King you trust him not to kill you or even that you are willing to submit to him even if he does elect to kill you. It is also believed that is where saluting originated too, (two knights meet and raise there visors etc.).

Maybe someone else has more insight into this practice and might be willing to elaborate?

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rodentgirl16 3 years, 8 months ago

For me, it's more a matter of respect than anything else. My grandpa always taught us that you don't wear a hat at the dinner table, just as you stand at respect when the National Anthem is played. For that matter, I always stand respectfully if I'm at a game when they play the Canadian Anthem. I don't put my hand over my heart, but we still acknowledge them. That said, it's not something that you have to do, it's what you should do, and no one deserves to have a hand put on them over it. It seems like that would negate the whole point of taking it off.

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Kat Christian 3 years, 8 months ago

The guy could have politely ask the man to please remove his hat for respect to our flag. Then if he hadn't after the anthem I would have told the guy he was disrepectful to our flag and a disgrace to our country....that he should leave if he doesn't like America.

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gatekeeper 3 years, 8 months ago

How many of you complaining about taking your hat off scream "home of the Chiefs" at Arrowhead? So much time wasted complaining about hats when we have men and women at war. Do you really think soldiers on patrol in Afghanistan care if a guy kept his hat on during the national anthem at a high school band performance. Good grief. You want to complain about disrespecting the anthem - boycott the Chiefs. That means no paying attn to anything Chiefs because they have encouraged disrespecting the anthem for years and years. No game for you tonight.

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nanimwe 3 years, 8 months ago

Why don't you ask a vet if they would prefer you take your hat off during the Anthem.

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consumer1 3 years, 8 months ago

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jstthefacts 3 years, 8 months ago

There is nothing about anybody's hat that has anything to do with anybody who died for this country. To imply such, is disrespectful to those veery people. Their is nothing about a hat that in any way compares to their life or yours or mine. Your life equals a hat. lol

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taylormade 3 years, 8 months ago

the asking of this question alone shows a great disrespect for God & Country. It shows where we are today, Wake up America. Take your hat off for the ones who died protecting your rights not to take off your hat off. And even though a lame president doesn't place his hand over his heart during the star spangled banner or National anthem, do it yourself so that you can be more of an America citizen then he is. Do you not have family members who have given their lives for this country? I'll be glad to share with you my people who have died. Do you not know what a privilege it is to find yourself here? Do you even care? If not allow us to show you where the line is to be shot. Who was the first to want to take "In God We Trust" off our public buildings, courts and currency, he should be at the front of the line. The cost to live here is low, learn the English language, Respect America, get out, or don't complain when we knock your hat off when you fail to remove it.

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parrothead8 3 years, 8 months ago

I think it's pretty stupid to legislate what people should wear/not wear during the playing of ANY song, but it's actually a law: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/36/301.html

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consumer1 3 years, 8 months ago

A good question is, what if you are an American muslim and have on a turbin? Does your religion exclude you from your patriotic duty as an American, Sworn to honor and uphold the rights and laws of American citizenship?

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estespark 3 years, 8 months ago

Most of us do not like everything about America. However, most of us like something about America.

Perhaps removal of headwear during the anthem should not be seen as blanket approval for the entirety of our nation's actions and instead be seen as gratitude/respect for that *something" we like.

Or, just be that guy and leave your hat on and/or batter someone for doing just that.

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beatrice 3 years, 8 months ago

What if you are one of these folks? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDRYZ2...

By the time you got the hat off, the song would be over.

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Bob Kraxner 3 years, 8 months ago

What exactly, is one showing respect to by removing their hat and standing up? And who decides just what, or who, that respect is being directed towards? Would somebody please answer this for me? I have practiced this my whole life, but only been told that it's respect for the stars & stripes. Is it respect for the people who formed this nation over 230 yrs ago? Is it respect for all the leaders ? ( many of whom have used their political power for personal gain at some point !) Is it respect for all the working class folk who have fought and died for the freedoms we often take for granted ? (while inadvertantly fighting for big business interests) I am a little confused here... somebody help me out please....

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scopi_guy 3 years, 8 months ago

The womens hats written about in 1922 (and up thru the 1960s) are far different than the hats most women (who wear them) wear today. Back then, a hat was often worn as part of their outfit anytime when leaving the house. The bouffant and beehive hairstyles helped to kill the hat industry. When stark/plain 'sack' dresses became popular, something was needed to counteract that starkness, and those big, teased styles were born to go with them.

Today, if you see a woman in a hat, it's usually a cap or other type of casual wear, not an outfit completer.

Should women remove their hats today? If they want to. If they're wearing a ball cap and think men should remove theirs, then I think they should remove theirs too.

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Laura Wilson 3 years, 8 months ago

I would but no one in this free country should be forced to, or stand, or recite anything or sing anything. Also, there are probably some cultures where men shouldn't remove a hat or head covering in public, same with women. We should respect their cultural values and they should respect ours but not to the extent of making them do something against those values. I lived in a foreign country as a child and while I stood respectfully for their national anthem I never sung it or saluted their flag. It was my choice to stand and be silent.

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MacHeath 3 years, 8 months ago

You should take off your hat. If you don't I won't go ballistic. If I see you licking your fork tho, I will come up beside your head.

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pizzapete 3 years, 8 months ago

I agree one should stand and take their hat off to show respect, but realize not everyone here is american or cares about our anthem. I have been to games where the crowd booed the canadian anthem after the playing of the american, how disrespectful is that. And yea, keep your hands to yourself!

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The_Original_Bob 3 years, 8 months ago

"Of course, I normally don't wear caps or sleeves..."

Haha. Wild Thing.

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Ricky_Vaughn 3 years, 8 months ago

Meh...land of the free right? Why can't I leave my hat on?

Of course, I normally don't wear caps or sleeves...

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The_Original_Bob 3 years, 8 months ago

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KS 3 years, 8 months ago

merrill - "Soldiers" as you call them, are required to take off their hats (both male and female) when inside, except for a few occassions, ie: their working assignments, ie: on the flight line and also at formal occassions. The hat is part of the uniform,as you say, but you will not see a "soldier" working at a desk, wearing their hat. I can only assume you have never served.

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KS 3 years, 8 months ago

merrill - "Soldiers" as you call them, are required to take off their hats (both male and female) when inside, except for a few occassions, ie: their working assignments, ie: on the flight line and also at formal occassions. The hat is part of the uniform,as you say, but you will not see a "soldier" working at a desk, wearing their hat. I can only assume you have never served.

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1029 3 years, 8 months ago

I always take off my hat and my shirt.

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Fixed_Asset 3 years, 8 months ago

I think one should only be ALLOWED to take off their hat, cover their heart, etc., IF they vote.

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RETICENT_IRREVERENT 3 years, 8 months ago

The penalty for failing to do so is being cuffed on the back of the neck, then shaken like a dog.

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del888 3 years, 8 months ago

Yes you should take off the hat. However, if you attend a football game in January at Arrowhead and the temp's at -10, you will see a lot of stocking hats & hoods still on the head. Questions, does this also apply to women - do women have to take off their hats?

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consumer1 3 years, 8 months ago

I would fight and risk my life for my country again. I don't aree with all the crap that goes on, but, we still have the best thing going. It is a personal matter to me. It shows my character, patriotism, dedication to freedom which was hard won by many before me and you.

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nut_case 3 years, 8 months ago

Well, by most accounts, the illegal immigrant population is 12+%...maybe that accounts for the vote. I will always remove my hat as a sign of respect for those who have fought and died for those colors.

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Amy Heeter 3 years, 8 months ago

I don't believe it should be required unless a person really feels it. I stand but do not put my hand over my heart. I usually don't wear hats.

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tomatogrower 3 years, 8 months ago

Of course people should be respectful during the national anthem, but it's just a hat. If someone forgets to take it off, it's not like it's treason. Everyone is ready to forgive big corporations for taking jobs out of the country so they can make huge profits and ruin our economy, which is unpatriotic, but they can't stand it if someone forgets to take their hat off? Priorities, people! And why should men be the only ones to take off their hat? I am a fememinist, and I wonder why men haven't questioned this.

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John Kyle 3 years, 8 months ago

Why do we need this 'patriot' test before every sporting event?

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grammaddy 3 years, 8 months ago

My 10- year- old grandson knows all of that, so does his 6-year -old brother. And after witnessing the firefighter at FSHS, they don't want to wear hats any more.

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kansasmutt 3 years, 8 months ago

Ask your 10 year old if he or she even knows what the anthem is. Ask them what the Pledge of Allegiance is. Ask them to tell you 3 of the Ten Comandments . And you think many will take of there hat, Haa Haa , your asking alot. Those days are over.

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independant1 3 years, 8 months ago

i always forget to doff the cap when the colors go by but always remember at sporting events.

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sad_lawrencian 3 years, 8 months ago

I am never somewhere in public where the national anthem is being sung or performed, so I don't have to take off my hat.

Well to think of it, I don't own a hat anyway.

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Richard Heckler 3 years, 8 months ago

Soldiers cannot remove their hats because it is part of the uniform.

Women are not expected to remove their hats.

Emily Post, in 1922, says “It is not necessary to add that every American male citizen stands with his hat off at the passing of the ‘colors’ and when the national anthem is played. If he didn’t, some other more loyal citizen would take it off for him.” It would seem to me that this act of forcing someone to remove their hat would disrespect the flag; further, the more “loyal citizen” she describes is actually virtually spitting on what the flag and the anthem represent.

On that note, I think one soldier’s comments I read recently said it best when he said the following: “I always thought showing true respect for the flag and song itself was in having the right to choose whether to keep my hat on or off.”

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Robert Burnham 3 years, 8 months ago

Respect the greatest country in the world by removing your hat. We're not perfect, but you can do almost anything in this country without getting stoned, whipped, amputated, hung or shot ( OK, except in Utah). Can't take off your hat, put your hand across your heart.

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geoismeo 3 years, 8 months ago

There was nothing good about the draft.

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KS 3 years, 8 months ago

Anyone who sits around and tries to come up with a reason for NOT removing one's hat during the anthem is simply out of touch with manners and respect. Manners that were apparntely never taught to them as a child. To me it says a lot about what is wrong with this country. Further, it is disrespectful for a male to wear a baseball cap indoors, which is something one could not get away with in the military. Oh, for the good ole days of the draft.

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jackbinkelman 3 years, 8 months ago

Some people wear hats as sun shields. Even a few minutes in intense sunlight can burn the scalp of a balding person.

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Roland Gunslinger 3 years, 8 months ago

Of course you should. It's a sign of respect. But you shouldn't batter someone if they get a case of forgetfulness and fail to remove their hat.

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Jim Phillips 3 years, 8 months ago

Only if one has been taught respect for the flag and the country. But I also respect your right to be disrespectful.

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