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Archive for Friday, May 7, 2010

Ground-breaking ceremony held for new KU engineering lab building

This image, which is subject to change, represents a visual schematic of Kansas University’s planned engineering building. Because of the emphasis on green technologies, and using the building as a lab, researchers are having ongoing input into the design of the building, which is not yet named.

This image, which is subject to change, represents a visual schematic of Kansas University’s planned engineering building. Because of the emphasis on green technologies, and using the building as a lab, researchers are having ongoing input into the design of the building, which is not yet named.

May 7, 2010, 12:00 p.m. Updated May 7, 2010, 4:40 p.m.

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KU officials break ground at new enigneering buildling site

The lab building will be 35,000 square feet and partially funded by private donations. Enlarge video

A new 34,600-square-foot engineering building on the Kansas University campus will house laboratories for research in a number of multi-disciplinary areas.

On Friday, KU officials broke ground on the engineering campus for the new building, primarily paid for using more than $14 million in federal government dollars. The engineering school and KU are contributing $6.5 million in matching funds for the project from private funds.

No classrooms or offices will be housed in the new yet-unnamed building, said Glen Marotz, associate engineering dean and principal investigator for the grant project.

The building, which will be constructed near Learned Hall, will house all kinds of research — work there will be done on biofuels, drug delivery, artificial knees and much more.

Turning the first shovels of dirt on Kansas University’s Engineering Complex Lawn at Friday’s groundbreaking ceremony are, from left, Linda Sims, Robb Sorem, Brandon DeKosky, Glen Marotz, Stuart Bell and KU Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little. The new building will house laboratories for multidisciplinary research.

Turning the first shovels of dirt on Kansas University’s Engineering Complex Lawn at Friday’s groundbreaking ceremony are, from left, Linda Sims, Robb Sorem, Brandon DeKosky, Glen Marotz, Stuart Bell and KU Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little. The new building will house laboratories for multidisciplinary research.

“What could be better than that?” Marotz said. “What could be better than trying to improve the human condition?”

The building’s exterior and interior will be home to new sustainable building research. Therefore, he said, as passers-by look at the building on day, they may see grates over the windows, and the next, the grates may be gone, and the windows may all be replaced with new ones.

“You can even use the building itself as an experiment,” Marotz said.

In line with federal stimulus guidelines, construction is moving quickly on the building, Marotz said, and could be completed as soon as October 2011.

At the groundbreaking ceremony, KU student Brandon DeKosky, a senior who received a $250,000 research fellowship from the Hertz Foundation, said that the building would open up “tremendous opportunities” for students.

“On a fundamental level, it will provide the lab space and updated facilities and enable us to conduct cutting-edge research on the international stage.”

Comments

somedude20 4 years, 7 months ago

Now how do you break the ground? Did a gaggle of fat people stand there for too long? All well, they had better fix that ground before they start to build otherwise the ground won't support the building

banksie 4 years, 7 months ago

Is there somewhere I can read about what he did?

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