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Archive for Sunday, May 3, 2009

Culture in a day: Get a taste of the arts on one tank of gas

The "Millipede" by Tom Otterness is the newest addition to the Martin H. Bush Outdoor Sculpture Collection at Wichita State University's Ulrich Museum of Art. The piece is one of more than 70 pieces of art scattered across the Wichita State campus. The outdoor exhibit is free and open to the public all day, every day.

The "Millipede" by Tom Otterness is the newest addition to the Martin H. Bush Outdoor Sculpture Collection at Wichita State University's Ulrich Museum of Art. The piece is one of more than 70 pieces of art scattered across the Wichita State campus. The outdoor exhibit is free and open to the public all day, every day.

May 3, 2009

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An image from the Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art at Kansas State University

An image from the Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art at Kansas State University

Thousands of people shop and admire art at the 2008 Downtown Kansas City Art Fair, organized by Howard Alan Events, Ltd. The second-annual art fair in the Power and Light District will be June 26 through June 28. Darrin Alan, marketing director with Howard Alan, said more than 200 juried artists will be featured at the event from all over the world. He said 25 percent of the artists selected will be from Kansas or Missouri.

Thousands of people shop and admire art at the 2008 Downtown Kansas City Art Fair, organized by Howard Alan Events, Ltd. The second-annual art fair in the Power and Light District will be June 26 through June 28. Darrin Alan, marketing director with Howard Alan, said more than 200 juried artists will be featured at the event from all over the world. He said 25 percent of the artists selected will be from Kansas or Missouri.

This car and motorcycle, created by Topekan Herman Divers and made of pull-tabs, is currently on display in the Grassroots Art Center, Lucas. The Grassroots Art Center exhibits the work of self-taught, outsider artists.

This car and motorcycle, created by Topekan Herman Divers and made of pull-tabs, is currently on display in the Grassroots Art Center, Lucas. The Grassroots Art Center exhibits the work of self-taught, outsider artists.

Looking for an art-inspired day trip this summer?

In addition to events going on in Lawrence, here are some suggestions to get on your calendar for checking out the region’s art and culture.

For more suggestions, be sure to check out the “A Day Away” special section inside today’s Journal-World.

• The District Art Annual Downtown Kansas City Art Fair will be returning to the Power and Light District for the second time this summer. The fair, put on by Howard Alan Event Ltd. based in Florida, features more than 200 local, national and international artists. The artists are selected by a jury.

“Since we aren’t a locally based company, our fair brings in art from around the country,” said Darrin Alan, marketing director with Howard Alan Event Ltd. “It brings a whole new aspect of art to the city. You’re guaranteed to see something you’ve never seen before.”

The free event is June 26-28.

• Washburn University’s 17th annual Mulvane Mountain/Plains Art Fair will bring more than 90 vendors from across the country to Topeka. The event will feature art from ceramics to photography and runs June 6-7.

• Though most people think “painting” or “sculpture” when they envision art, there is another side of artistic expression that is often left out: the art of storytelling.

Every April since 1994, storytellers and enraptured listeners gather in Downs — “The Storytelling Capital of Kansas” — for Kansas Storytelling Festival.

“Storytelling is so much more than just telling a joke,” said Glennys Doane, a member of the festival’s steering committee. “It’s a way of passing down legacies and cultures. It’s a way of entertaining for sure, but it’s also part of our history.”

The event is April 24-25.

• Kansas University’s Spencer Museum of Art has been focused on environmental themes this spring, and the Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art at Kansas State University will have its own environmental show.

The Manhattan museum will offer two exhibits from mid-June to Aug. 16 that document Mother Nature’s destructive side. One is a collection of pictures from Greensburg by Larry Scharm. The other, “Destruction Framed,” by several Manhattan photographers, depicts the Chapman/Manhattan tornado of 2008.

Both museums are free and open to the public.

• If you find art museums too stifling, Wichita State University’s Ulrich Museum of Art will be a breath of fresh air. Much of the museum’s collection is on display outside, so you can experience art at any time, free of charge.

“When people think of museums, they think of what’s on the walls,” said Teresa Veazey, public relations manager for the museum. “We want them to also think about what’s outside. Anytime you can walk by something or look at a work of art and think about what it means is important.”

• Another interesting art venue in Kansas is the Muchnic Art Gallery in Atchison. The museum, on the second floor of a Queen Anne-style mansion, often features artwork from Benedictine College and K-12 schools in the area as well as state and national artists.

“The museum dispels this notion that coming into the art gallery is an extraordinary thing,” said Gloria Davis, executive director of the museum.

Davis said the museum was opened in the 1960s, and exhibits rotate every eight weeks.

• The art offered at most fairs and galleries is from professional or at least trained artists. This is not the case at the Grassroots Art Center in Lucas. The center only carries artwork from self-taught artists.

“It’s not normally what you would find in a fine arts gallery,” said Rosslyn Schultz, executive director of the center. “Our mission is to be enablers of art, to unleash the creativity within, whatever the medium.”

Schultz said a lot of the artwork in the center comes from recycled materials and “piles of junk” that people turn into beautiful pieces of art.

Schultz said the center changes exhibits twice a year, in April or May and again in September. She said this summer the center will feature an exhibit on fabric, which includes reconstructed dolls by Madison resident Janet Fish.

— Kansas University intern Aly Van Dyke can be reached at 832-7126.

Comments

myvotecounts 5 years, 5 months ago

LJWorld, please remove the photo of the centipede, any mention of the person who constructed it, and your recommendation that people visit the site. And then I hope you will also please remove my comment. Earlier in that person's "career," he acquired a puppy for an art project, shot the puppy, filmed it, and called the film art.

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Leslie Swearingen 5 years, 5 months ago

I will not be spending one cent on art. There is nothing sillier than art g o b b le d y g o o k speak. Now is not a good time for this. We have better things to be focusing on now and spending time and money on.

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alakazam 5 years, 5 months ago

i agree with the first poster this cruel and abusive "artist" should not be mentioned at all. he admitted that when he was 25 he adopted a puppy and shot it filming it's slow death. he aptly named the piece of crappy film art "puppy shot". does LJ world condone this type of art??? i would hope not. while the Artist is good we should not forget how he came to have the acclaim and honor, the first public reaction to any of his art was that poor puppy dying. please remove the links and pictures that refer to this animal killer.

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left_of_center 5 years, 5 months ago

Irish: No one is asking you to spend any money on art. Many of these museums and art fairs mentioned offer free admission, and you don't have to buy a piece of art to enjoy it. Going to a museum or art fair for a day is just as satisfying and fulfilling as actually purchasing a piece. From your comment I would deduct that you have never taken the time to fully appreciate and understand a work of art, and that if you did, you would understand what I'm talking about. Art is something that will always be a part of our culture and society, regardless of the current times. Some of the most important and influential art has come out of tumultuous and trying times, so we should be receptive to art now more than ever.

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