Archive for Thursday, April 23, 2009

Lawrence man faces multiple federal drug charges

April 23, 2009

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Federal prosecutors have charged a 40-year-old Lawrence man with multiple drug counts.

Willie West is charged with three counts of distributing crack cocaine and one count each of distributing crack cocaine within 1,000 feet of Centennial Park, 600 Rockledge Road; distributing crack cocaine and distributing marijuana, both within 1,000 feet of Holcom Park, 2601 W. 25th St.; possession with intent to distribute marijuana within 1,000 feet of Holcom Park; and maintaining a residence in the 2300 block of West 26th Street, for the purpose of distributing marijuana, U.S. Attorney spokesman Jim Cross said Thursday.

The Lawrence-Douglas County Drug Enforcement Unit investigated the crimes, which are alleged to have occurred in 2007 and 2008 in Douglas County, Cross said.

Comments

Vitruvian 5 years, 11 months ago

This man should be freed at once. He has harmed no one.

Steve Jacob 5 years, 11 months ago

Please tell me your joking Vitruvian. The "distributing crack cocaine" is pretty major in my book.

Leslie Swearingen 5 years, 11 months ago

Vitruvian If you know something about this man that would make the police release him, please let us all know. It sounds to me like he was investigated thoroughly before the arrest was made. I think that some are not understanding a vital point here, which is, break the law, get caught, get arrested.

tlawrence1957 5 years, 11 months ago

hey guys ! look the man knew he was breaking the law in all cases now he gotta pay for the crime, i'll tell ya way he got caught,selling dope is not a job,maybe he thought it was, the law say it not.

Practicality 5 years, 11 months ago

Oh Vitruvian is just under the misguided belief that selling drugs is a victimless crime. I am sure more idiotic posts will say similar sentiments concerning the honorable Willie West.

Great Job Lawrence-Douglas County Drug Enforcement Unit, keep up the good work.

Practicality 5 years, 11 months ago

edjayhawk (Anonymous) says…

"If marijuana was legal you would see a drop in crime by at least 50%."

Really, 50%. And you come by this percentage how . . . .?

Next you are going to tell me you want to legalize Hemp because of the great, comfortable clothes it makes and that you just can't find a nylon rope that quite measures up to a Hemp rope. Spare me.

misslawrence 5 years, 11 months ago

he was indicted 2 years ago,.,looking at 25 years in the Federal Pen.,.hmmmm,wonder how he's gonna get outta this one this second round.,.,

local_support 5 years, 11 months ago

“If marijuana was legal you would see a drop in crime by at least 50%.”

Really, 50%. And you come by this percentage how … .

Well maybe not 50% of the total amount of ALL criminal activity but at least that much in drug related crime, as marijuana arrests account for almost half of all drug arrests.

Practicality 5 years, 11 months ago

local_support (Anonymous) says…

"Well maybe not 50% of the total amount of ALL criminal activity but at least that much in drug related crime, as marijuana arrests account for almost half of all drug arrests."

I reply to you the same local_support.

Really, 50%. And you come by this percentage how … .?

Practicality 5 years, 11 months ago

local_support,

You are close enough in your statement for me not to make a big deal about it.

tangential_reasoners_anonymous 5 years, 11 months ago

"Lawrence man faces multiple federal drug charges"

Let us hope they are of sufficient voltage.

dweezil222 5 years, 11 months ago

I'll give you a reason to legalize: the $40 billion a year that's spent on enforcing ineffective laws. For a fiscal swing of $40 billion + tax revenue, I'll take it.

rabb 5 years, 11 months ago

Ask cops what they think about drug legalization.
The answers may surprise you.

http://www.leap.cc/cms/index.php

Next, check out some pot smokers who turned out OK.

http://veryimportantpotheads.com/

And then check out some victims of the drug war.

http://blogs.salon.com/0002762/stories/2003/08/17/drugWarVictims.html

benmuggn 5 years, 11 months ago

well if you just legalize all the natural drugs and tax them we could get out of debt. And in california selling pot is a job. This country was founded on weed and will always be a big role in this country. 2 billion people cant be wrong. There is no proof that pot harms you or anythhing else. Booze is legal and it kills thousands each year. i smoked it for 25 years and went to work everyday and paid my bills so what is really the problem here besides we have to say who bad who good but actually everyone breaks the law in one way or another so arent we all hipocrits in america.

del888 5 years, 11 months ago

Hey Rabb, As long as you are sticking up for the dopers, why don't you also post how many pot heads did NOT turn out OK. Also, how many high school age kids are now doing heroin because it's so cheap. Those kids are going to end up under a bridge - either living there or landing there when they jump. Lets see all sides of your story - not just your side.

dweezil222 5 years, 11 months ago

I'm not even advocating for the legalization of hard drugs. Legalize pot and use some of the resources freed up to fight the bad stuff. As for those who are now doing heroin, etc., well, no one put a gun to their head and made them escalate. All the crap about pot being a gateway drug is b.s. for people who have even a modicum of discipline. I knew some people when I was in high school who smoked a LOT of weed. Guess what? None of them ever moved on. It's all about personal choice, and the simple truth is no one has ever died from marijuana. Alcohol is far more dangerous. I've heard some comment that the only roadblock to legalizing weed is that they don't want people driving under the influence, and as of now there's no way of conducting an accurate, effective roadside test for someone being under the influence of marijuana (as opposed to having just smoked it in the last couple days or something).

Practicality 5 years, 11 months ago

rabb (Anonymous) says…

“Ask cops what they think about drug legalization. The answers may surprise you.”

http://www.leap.cc/cms/index.php

rabb. I am unsure if you are not really somebody else, like logrithmic, for you like to claim the same sources he does. It really doesn’t matter. This “leap” source you, and others, and especially Logrithmic, like to point at as some sort of legitmate proof to show how Law Enforcement feels about drug legalization is a facade.

You, and many others are constantly pointing to this as some sort of proof that “cops” or Law Enforcement in general see the illegalization of drugs as a failed venture or an unworthy cause.

While it is true that there are “some” cops and law enforcement personnel who believe this, they are so far in the minority that they are considered to be just some nut cases who happen to be in Law Enforcement. In any profession you will find dissenters, and one as large as Law Enforcenment will have its share as well. But, by no means, do they represent Law Enforcement or cops general, prevailing, vast majority of a view that Drugs should remain illegal.

Here is the actual membership of LEAP, that you and others like to claim are for drug legalization.

“Although those who speak publicly for LEAP are people from the law enforcement and criminal justice communities, a large number of our supporting members do not have such experience. You don't have to have law enforcement experience to join us.”

“Membership in LEAP is open to anyone but only current or former members of law enforcement can be board members or public speakers for LEAP.”

The above quotes were taken from the LEAP website and can be found with this link.

http://www.leap.cc/cms/index.php?name=Content&pid=4

It is obvious that LEAP does not represent the prevailing feelings concerning the Drug Legalization issue that rabb and logrithmic want us to believe. Instead it is made up primarily of KOOKS who have no Law Enforcement experience. It parades around in front of the public a few Law Enforcement Personnel, who hardly are speaking for the majority in their profession, to give off the impression of legitimacy. We are not fooled.

Gotcha again Loggie. Another wacko source you like to claim is discovered to be nothing more than a smoke screen by the same Pro-Drug crowd who constitute the majority of the memberships of all your Drug Legalization organizations.

Calliope877 5 years, 11 months ago

An End to the War on Weed? Marijuana advocates believe legalization is on the horizon. By Nathan Comp http://www.inthesetimes.com

As a medley of border violence, recessionary pressure, international criticism and popular acceptance steadily undermines America’s decades-long effort to eliminate drugs and drug use, the U.S. movement to legalize marijuana is gaining unprecedented momentum.

Once derided and dismissed by lawmakers, law enforcers and the law-abiding alike, marijuana reform is sweeping the nation, although the federal government appears committed—at least for the time being—to largely maintaining the status quo.

A week after Attorney General Eric Holder announced in March that raids on state law-abiding medical marijuana dispensaries would end, the Drug Enforcement Agency effectively shut down a San Francisco dispensary, claiming it violated both state and federal laws.

But to paraphrase Victor Hugo, not even the strongest government in the world can stop an idea whose time has apparently come.

Indeed, support for legalization is at an all-time high, and continues to grow. In 1969, just 12 percent of Americans favored legalizing marijuana, the Holy Grail of cannabis advocates; this number had tripled by 2005, according to a Gallup poll. Barely three years later, another poll showed 44 percent of Americans support legalization.

continued...

Calliope877 5 years, 11 months ago

“If we continue on this curve—and there is no reason to think we won’t—we’ll hit 58 or 60 percent by 2020,” says Allen St. Pierre, executive director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML). “We’re seeing also that the government is finally playing catch up with the people.”

In February, a California state lawmaker introduced a bill to legalize and tax pot, and marijuana reform bills are being debated in at least 37 other states. (Last November, Massachusetts became the thirteenth state to decriminalize adult possession, while Michigan became the thirteenth state to legalize marijuana for medical use.) All told, more than one-third of Americans now live in a state or city that has legalized medical marijuana or decriminalized its recreational use.

“It’s the busiest period for marijuana law reform ever,” says St. Pierre. “Legalization is definitely on the political horizon.”

Growing calls for reform: Arguments for ending the war on weed—that marijuana is safer than alcohol and that its prohibition leads to violence, exorbitant enforcement costs, billions in lost tax revenue and infringements on civil liberties—haven’t changed much since the 1970s.

But the arguments have taken on unusual gravity over the last year, as drug-fueled violence along the Mexican side of border has excited fears that the carnage and mayhem will spill over into American cities. Testifying before a House panel in March, a top Homeland Security official warned (PDF link) that the cartels now represent America’s largest organized-crime threat, having infiltrated at least 230 American cities. Already, police in Tucson and Phoenix have reported a surge in drug-related kidnappings and murders.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton recently acknowledged that America’s “insatiable” appetite for drugs has helped fuel the cartel-related violence. In fact, the Mexican cartels reap as much as 62 percent of their profits—and derive much of their power—from American marijuana sales, which total $9 billion annually, according to the Office of National Drug Control Policy.

But Mexican weed represents only a sliver of America’s annual cannabis consumption. Each year, Americans spend a whopping $39 billion on domestically grown marijuana, and another $7-10 billion on weed smuggled in from Canada. In short, untaxed and unregulated marijuana is America’s—if not the continent’s—largest cash crop, more valuable than corn and wheat combined, according to DrugScience.org.

Calliope877 5 years, 11 months ago

continued...

The growing sense that America’s marijuana policy is more harmful than the plant itself is leading some cash-strapped states to rethink the efficacy of locking up non-violent offenders and consider taxing medical marijuana, despite the federal prohibition on doing so. Several California cities are already taxing medical marijuana sales. Oregon’s legislature is debating whether to regulate and tax it as well. (Last year a bill that would have allowed Oregon liquor stores to sell marijuana failed.)

And in the first such step by a state government, New Mexico’s Department of Public Health is now overseeing the cultivation and distribution of medical marijuana, brushing aside legal concerns that state employees could face federal drug conspiracy charges.

Although marijuana reform has gained little traction in Congress, last year Reps. Barney Frank (D-MA) and Ron Paul (R-TX) cosponsored a bill to protect medical marijuana patients and decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana. “It’s no longer just potheads who want this,” says Bill Piper, director of national affairs for the Drug Policy Alliance. “We’re at the tipping point, in that we’re seeing the most sustained discussion ever by media and policymakers.”

Although President Obama jokingly brushed aside economic arguments for ending marijuana prohibition during his March 26th online town-hall discussion, a mounting body of research underscores their validity.

In 2005, Harvard University economist Jeffrey Miron published a report showing that legalization would save $7.7 billion each year on enforcement, while generating as much as $6.2 billion in taxes. In response, more than 500 leading economists wrote an open letter to federal and state officials supporting a regime of legalization and taxation.

With increasing frequency, mainstream media outlets are also advocating major changes to U.S. drug laws. In March, the Economist’s editorial board called for the legalization of drugs, and CNN, Time magazine and other publications have published op-eds supporting an end to marijuana prohibition or calling for an “honest” discussion about legalizing drugs. Also earlier this year, the Latin American Commission on Drugs and Democracy, which includes three former heads of state, issued a report condemning drug prohibition and calling for cannabis’ legalization.

“[Cannabis] consumption has an adverse impact on the user’s health, including mental health,” the 17 commission members wrote. “But the available empirical evidence shows that the harm caused by this drug is similar to the harm caused by alcohol or tobacco.”

continued...

Calliope877 5 years, 11 months ago

The ‘vanguard’ of legalization?: American attitudes toward cannabis have softened considerably over the last decade, yet they remain largely ambivalent about reform. “Most people agree the laws are too harsh, but many of these don’t want to see it legalized, either,” says Mason Tvert, who in 2005 co-founded SAFER Colorado, which promotes marijuana as a safer alternative to alcohol.

Economic arguments like those supported by Miron’s Harvard study, says Tvert, are ineffective because the same could be said of hard drugs like cocaine and heroin. Legalization, he says, will happen only when people realize that marijuana is safer than alcohol.

“The problem is that people still have a perception of harm that’s been built up over many years,” he says. “If marijuana were legalized tomorrow, in 10 years these perceptions would be very, very different.”

Tvert agrees that perceptions about marijuana are rapidly evolving for the better. Earlier this year, when a picture surfaced showing Olympic gold-medalist Michael Phelps smoking from a bong, many expected the 23-year-old to lose many of his endorsements. But only Kellogg’s dropped him. Even more surprising, the move seemed to hurt Kellogg’s more than Phelps, as surveys showed the move injured its brand reputation.

For those seeking higher office, past pot use is no longer the political death knell it once was. When asked if he ever smoked pot in 1992, Bill Clinton claimed he didn’t inhale, and in 2005, tapes surfaced of George W. Bush acknowledging past marijuana use after years spent dodging the question. Remarkably, voters seemed largely unconcerned by Barack Obama’s candid admission that he once used both marijuana and cocaine. “This is a huge turning point in people admitting to past use and not suffering any consequences,” says Piper.

With public acceptance growing and states increasingly at odds with federal marijuana laws, how much longer can Washington remain impervious to calls for reform? NORML’s St. Pierre, who says there are major chinks in the armor of blanket prohibition, believes federal reforms are imminent.

“At some point, we’ll have run the gauntlet of states that have passed reform bills by popular vote,” he says. “It’s getting harder for people to say we’re going to hell-in-a-basket when the state next door has had these laws for years without problems. This generation is on the vanguard of legalization.”

RedwoodCoast 5 years, 11 months ago

I fully believe that we could make more of an impact on the availability of hard drugs if we simply took cannabis out of the equation. Also, I think the use of hard drugs would drop if we did so. Marijuana is currently fixed within the same economic sector as hard drugs. Take pot out of that classification, and anyone buying drugs is going to be buying hard drugs. Every drug dealer would then be dealing hard drugs, and all of the impact of the "War on Drugs" will be in the hard drug market. That's just my opinion, though.

rabb 5 years, 11 months ago

del888 (Anonymous) says…

Hey Rabb, As long as you are sticking up for the dopers, why don't you also post how many pot heads did NOT turn out OK. Also, how many high school age kids are now doing heroin because it's so cheap. Those kids are going to end up under a bridge - either living there or landing there when they jump. Lets see all sides of your story - not just your side.

Well Del,

Since it is "my" story I'm showing you my side of it. Make sense? If you have a different side to show, why don't you. Maybe you can do some research and tell me how many potheads don't turn out OK. However, since you don't seem to have access to Google, let me help with some heroin links....

http://www.heroinabuse.us/statistics-facts.html

http://www.alcohol-and-drug-guide.com/heroin-use-usa.html

http://www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/DrugFact/heroin/heroin_ff.html

And since you decided to compare apples to oranges by bringing up heroin, I'll do the same. (Notice I referenced marijuana, not heroin.) Let's compare heroin with America's favorite and most abused LEGAL drug, alcohol....

http://www.marininstitute.org/Youth/alcohol_youth.htm

http://www.alcoholstats.com/page.aspx?id=135#16

Why don't you and Practicality meet and discuss over a cold one at Free State.

Sigmund 5 years, 11 months ago

edjayhawk (Anonymous) says… "If marijuana was legal you would see a drop in crime by at least 50%."

If nothing was illegal crime would drop by 100%!!!

rabb 5 years, 11 months ago

Practicality said.....

rabb. I am unsure if you are not really somebody else, like logrithmic, for you like to claim the same sources he does. It really doesn’t matter. This “leap” source you, and others, and especially Logrithmic, like to point at as some sort of legitmate proof to show how Law Enforcement feels about drug legalization is a facade.

It is obvious that LEAP does not represent the prevailing feelings concerning the Drug Legalization issue that rabb and logrithmic want us to believe. Instead it is made up primarily of KOOKS who have no Law Enforcement experience. It parades around in front of the public a few Law Enforcement Personnel, who hardly are speaking for the majority in their profession, to give off the impression of legitimacy. We are not fooled.

Gotcha again Loggie. Another wacko source you like to claim is discovered to be nothing more than a smoke screen by the same Pro-Drug crowd who constitute the majority of the memberships of all your Drug Legalization organizations.

I don't think you got anybody. Sorry that I'm not Logrithmic. I'm also sorry that you missed the following when you were cherry picking statements from the LEAP website. These guys must all be KOOKS!

LEAP's Board of Directors is made up of Jack Cole, who retired as a lieutenant after 26 years in the New Jersey state police--14 years in their narcotic bureau; Peter Christ a retired police captain from Tonawanda, New York; John Gayder a currently serving police officer with a department in Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada; Terry Nelson, who served in the US Border Patrol, the US Customs Service, and the Department of Homeland Security; Tony Ryan, a retired police officer from Denver, Colorado, Jerry Paradis, a retired Provincial Court judge from British Columbia, Canada and James Anthony, a prosecutor in Oakland, California.

Apology accepted.

Deja Coffin 5 years, 11 months ago

LooPerkinsucks (Anonymous) says…

"Willie West sounds like a pornstar name."

My thoughts exactly!! That made me laugh!

grimpeur 5 years, 11 months ago

rabb wrote:

"Next, check out some pot smokers who turned out OK."

http://veryimportantpotheads.com/

OMG! John Lennon? Bob Marley? Whaaaa?

Phil Lesh? Say it ain't so!

Mixolydian 5 years, 11 months ago

I'm firmly in the legalization of marijuana camp, but I don't buy for a second that no one has ever died from smoking weed. There's been plenty of carnage on the road from high and impaired drivers. That's in addition to the well documented harmful effects of pot smoking.

Just because it's decriminalized doesn't mean that it can't be tightly regulated. Tax the snot out of the cultivation and sale. Issue expensive licenses for the growing of marijuana. Any unlicenced growing or sales would result in steep civil penalties.

It's a goldmine for the government coffers. Huge savings in interdiction, prosecution and incarceration/supervision costs and piles of taxes and licensing fees.

sinverguenza 5 years, 11 months ago

OMG I think I know this guy. Never knew about the crack, though.

Say no to crack, kids. And don't legalize marijuana. The government can't handle its business as it is. I'm for decriminalization, though. A "grow your own" policy really doesn't hurt anybody so long as you aren't exposing the kids to the secondhand smoke. Other than that, "grow your own" prevents drug cartels from making millions illegally, and reduces all the crime associated with the drug (possession, transaction, trafficking, murders and theft) overall.

But really, say no to crack.

MidWestCoastSplit 5 years, 11 months ago

ok so maybe some one has died or caused someone elses death while they were high... ill agree with that but i have never, ever heard of someone dying from a "weed overdose" - ever. id bet that plain old stupidity and ignorance are behind more casualities than almost anything else. so why isnt driving under the influence of "stupid" against the law yet?

LiberalWiner 5 years, 11 months ago

We should form an anarchist organization to promote free drugs!

rabb 5 years, 11 months ago

Log,

Thanks for the link. I'm familiar with Webb and his prison reform efforts but had not seen this most recent article. I think LEAP is a great tool for people who are at least open to the argument that what we're doing now isn't working. The drug war has been going on now for decades with no winners and poor results. Some people just won't change and can't give up. Sad but true.

And a happy belated 420 to you and yours!

http://www.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,1892924_1873647,00.html

Calliope877 5 years, 11 months ago

RedwoodCoast (Anonymous) says…

"I fully believe that we could make more of an impact on the availability of hard drugs if we simply took cannabis out of the equation. Also, I think the use of hard drugs would drop if we did so. Marijuana is currently fixed within the same economic sector as hard drugs. Take pot out of that classification, and anyone buying drugs is going to be buying hard drugs. Every drug dealer would then be dealing hard drugs, and all of the impact of the “War on Drugs” will be in the hard drug market. That's just my opinion, though."

I have the same opinion. I believe everyone else will catch up with our thinking eventually...:)

Practicality 5 years, 11 months ago

logrithmic (Anonymous) says…

"Rabb,

Ahh yes. And celebrated magnificently I might add!" (Referring to 4/20, considered National Marijuana Day or something of the sort)

This is the true reason you and most others want to legalize Marijuana. It is not because you want to wear Hemp clothes, or have a rope made of hemp, or any of the other phony reasons you claim. It is simply that you and many others in Lawrence like to get "high", and are trying any way you can to justify it.

Of all the social ills that affect our country, and all the problems going on in America and the World, wanting people to legalize your poor, ignorant choice to use a substance that is NOT good for you, can cause many legal troubles, and is a bad influence on impressionable children, tells me how selfish you guys really are.

Would you want your children to smoke Marijuana?

Again, LEAP is a smoke screen. Just because they put SOME law enforcement personnel as their figure heads does not mean that they speak for Law Enforcement in general. And the membership that constitutes the majority of LEAP, are in reality, just a bunch of stoners like yourselves. So quit proclaiming to the readers that they should be taken seriously.

rabb 5 years, 11 months ago

Practicality,

Log's right.
You don't care for facts or truth. Nowhere have I given any "phony reasons" for legalization. Your arguments are pretty lame and pathetic bordering on idiotic. But, I'll play along for now.

"Of all the social ills that affect our country, and all the problems going on in America and the World, wanting people to legalize your poor, ignorant choice to use a substance that is NOT good for you, can cause many legal troubles, and is a bad influence on impressionable children, tells me how selfish you guys really are."

No one said pot is good for you. That's not the point. Coffee isn't good for you but possessing it won't get you prison time. Nor are you likely to be shot by a swat team that mistakenly knocked down your door looking for your neighbor's coffee stash. Alcohol is not good for you either, but I don't hear any arguments for prohibition from you. Would you like to discuss how good cigarettes are for you also? Lots of controversy over banning smoking in bars. Imagine if cigarettes were illegal. Do you think people would stop smoking??? Hardly. Legal problems associated with pot arise because pot is ILLEGAL! If it were legal, NO LEGAL PROBLEMS!!

I have no children. If I did, I would not want to see them locked up for smoking pot.

LEAP is not a smoke screen. LEAP was started by Law Enforcement officers tired of fighting a losing battle. You have no idea who constitutes the majority of LEAP members. Just because they may not represent Law Enforcement in general, doesn't mean they should not be taken seriously.

You focus on LEAP and neglect to mention anything about this link......

http://blogs.salon.com/0002762/stories/2003/08/17/drugWarVictims.html

That is law enforcement in general.

Practicality 5 years, 11 months ago

rabb,

I have posted previously on everything you mention in other threads. Claiming Marijuana should be legal by comparing it to detrimental and addictive substances hardly seems like a legitimate reason to legalize anything. If you believe Marijuana is similar to those other substances that are harmful, maybe you should advocate for those other substances to be made illegal as well.

This argument you make,

" Imagine if cigarettes were illegal. Do you think people would stop smoking??? Hardly. Legal problems associated with pot arise because pot is illegal! If it were legal, no legal problems!!"

could be made for every law that is presently on the books. Every law in America is broken by someone. Does that mean we should abolish all laws? Hardly. You believe the only problem with Marijuana is that it is illegal. I believe Marijuana is harmful to the user whether illegal or not. If you choose to use Marijuana, I doubt the police are going to focus too much on catching you. But, it is still illegal. So if you are willing to risk all the negative consequences that comes with using Marijuana just because you like to get "high", your reasoning and judgment is not really worth arguing with, for I am not going to be able to convince you to look beyond your own wants and desires to understand the negative consequences associated with your behavior. There will not be any way that I or anyone could convince you of anything, when the reality is, you are only concerned with the immediate thrill of being high, and that appears to take precedence over everything else. The only option that leaves society is to punish you for making bad choices that are harmful to you and society as well.

It is apparent that you, and most people like you want Marijuana to be legal because you like to smoke Marijuana. Every illegal substance (and some legal ones) has users who think it isn't harmful to them in moderation or to society as a whole. You seem to draw the line with Marijuana. A Heroin user wants to include Heroin. A coke user wants to include coke. Etc. etc. etc. I believe that they are all harmful to the user, their families, and society. And, just to clarify, telling me it isn't any worse than alcohol will most definitely not get me to change my opinion either, for it is a terrible substance that is harmful to society as well.

By the way, you never answered this question, assuming if and when you do have children.

Would you want your children to be pot heads?

c4bl36u9 5 years, 11 months ago

Practicality,

Would you want your children to be pot heads?

I have been smoking since high school. Have always been employed, bought a 165K house and had a kid last year and been remodeling 2 of the floors with my family since Halloween 08'. And I don't mean painting the walls, I'm talking about ripping out existing walls and making my own layout while working 40-60 hrs a week. Got everything done and the carpet laid on 4/20. And ya damn right I felt like celebrating which I did.

So as long as my children are as successful in life as I have been so far, I could care less how much grass they smoked or what people like you think of them or any of the rest us.

Practicality 5 years, 11 months ago

log,

Nice try. Again you just say things with out any concern for truth or of being factual in your statements. Your attempt to try and dismiss me as a religious extremist is absurd and just another woeful attempt to smoke screen the real issues. It doesn't work again. It is hard to be a religious extremist when I am only found in church for weddings and funerals.

It's friday night, by reading your post it appears you are stoned out of your mind again down in your mothers basement.

Practicality 5 years, 11 months ago

c4bl36u9,

congrats on the house and the kid. I hope for your child's sake you will mature enough in the coming years to be a positive role model for him/her. Kids deserve a chance in life, and I hope you will not start them off down a hard road by modeling a behavior that is inconsistent with your childs best interests.

But, I imagine you will be like most parents who have "smoked a little weed" and eventually realize that it isn't a productive lifestyle to encourage upon their children. You will either hide its use from your child when he/she is older, (which prooves my point on not wanting your child to use it), or stop altogether, (which prooves my point on not wanting your child to use it), or just use it in front of your kid, (which prooves my point that you are a selfish individual who cares more about your own personal desire to get "high" than the negative consequences associated with its use for you and your child).

Practicality 5 years, 11 months ago

It could be argued that all laws restrict personal liberty. That is what laws do. Peoples personal liberty is sometimes restricted when it is determined it is for the greater good. Drug laws fall into that category.

Practicality 5 years, 11 months ago

logrithmic (Anonymous) says…

"Fact is, 40 million Americans presently smoke pot episodically. Why? They see nothing wrong with it and are willing to treat laws against it like the millions of citizens who violate speed limits every day."

And, like speed limit laws, the government has decided to place a limit on personal freedom by restricting the speed at which one can drive for the safety and greater good of society. The same can be said for drug laws. So do you also advocate for no speed limits as well. I am sure some people can drive at 100 mph better than others who drive at 30 mph.

I think you must be "high" when you start posting hippie songs.

Practicality 5 years, 11 months ago

logrithmic (Anonymous) says…

"My belief is that most of those who have stoped would smoke it again if it were legal or if they were not tested for pot consumption at work.Over 100 million have experimented with pot. My belief is that most of those who have stoped would smoke it again if it were legal or if they were not tested for pot consumption at work."

Ahhh, almost missed this little gem of yours. So you finally admit that the illegalization of drugs deters drug use. Which is what I have been saying all along. I guess the War on Drugs hasn't been a lost cause, unless you think drugs are good for people. For in your own estimation, it prevents 60 million people from using it.

Give people enough rope, and they will hang themselves with it. Too true, logie, too true.

rabb 5 years, 11 months ago

Practicality said, "I have posted previously on everything you mention in other threads. Claiming Marijuana should be legal by comparing it to detrimental and addictive substances hardly seems like a legitimate reason to legalize anything. If you believe Marijuana is similar to those other substances that are harmful, maybe you should advocate for those other substances to be made illegal as well."


I say, NO! YOU should advocate for those substances to be made illegal. YOU'RE the one that wants marijuana illegal. A Big Mac and/or a Grand Slam is bad for you but they're not illegal. Cigarettes? Bad, yet not illegal. My whole point is that greater harm is caused by the illegality of marijuana than the harm that is caused by marijuana itself.

Still would love to hear your opinion about the true casualties of this misguided war.

http://blogs.salon.com/0002762/stories/2003/08/17/drugWarVictims.html

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