Archive for Sunday, July 22, 1990

Also from July 22

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SEEKING SISTERS
July 22, 1990
It may be time for the city of Lawrence to practice a little family planning. Taxpayers probably are going to ask if they can afford the cost of adopting many more sister cities.
THANKS TO BLEVINS
July 22, 1990
Editor, Journal-World: Nobody else has done this, but I am happy to do so. The citizens of Lawrence owe a debt of gratitude to Leslie W. Blevins Sr., for his efforts and persistence concerning the methods of funding the proposed south trafficway. As a result, we will now be able to approve or disapprove the expenditure of our money for the project, by means of a public vote.
EUDORA SCHOOL DILEMMA
July 22, 1990
It looks as if Lawrence won’t be the only school district in Douglas County to ask voters in November to approve a bond issue to build a new high school. When voters in Eudora go to the polls, however, they won’t really have much choice. They won’t be asked to replace a high school building. By the time November rolls around, there probably will be no Eudora High school. The building, which has been declared a safety hazard, is schedule to have been razed and replaced with temporary classrooms which will remain in place for at least three years while a new school is being approved, planned and built.
FOR THE RECORD
July 22, 1990
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
LAWRENCE RIVERFRONT PLAZA NOW 70 FULL
July 22, 1990
The Lawrence Riverfront Plaza is 70 percent full now, with 38 spaces leased, says David Longhurst, manager of the factory outlet center. The following is a list of the 34 stores that are now open:
RESCUERS GET RACCOON OUT OF DUMPSTER
July 22, 1990
A raccoon that was down in the dumpster Saturday is bound for freedom today. The raccoon was trapped in a city dumpster for several hours and eventually rescued by an animal care volunteer, who took the animal at the request of some concerned apartment residents who live nearby.
ALLAN WEINSTEIN
July 22, 1990
Private inurnment services for Allan Weinstein, 60, Lawrence, will be held in August at the Beth El Cemetery in Paramus, N.J. Mr. Weinstein died July 12 at Lawrence Memorial Hospital following a short illness. The body was cremated.
LAWRENCE MAN DIES AT KUMC AFTER ACCIDENT
July 22, 1990
A 36-year-old Lawrence man died Saturday morning at the Kansas University Medical Center where he was taken after being injured in an automobile accident late Friday in Lawrence. James O. Wilson, 36, 2608 Rawhide, died at 11:52 a.m. at the medical center in Kansas City, Kan. He had been in the intensive care unit for several hours, a KUMC nursing supervisor said.
COST OF BOND ISSUE FOR SCHOOL DISTRICT FIGURED AT $94,000
July 22, 1990
The Lawrence school district’s proposal for a $31.8 million bond issue for building a second high school and upgrading other district facilities also covers the cost of issuing the bonds. School officials have estimated that cost to be $94,000.
STORM REPAIRS AT CLINTON MARINA NOT YET COMPLETE
July 22, 1990
Although the Clinton Marina looks to be better shape than it did the days immediately after a damaging mid-June wind storm, some structure damage remains. Amy Waibel, manager of the marina, said a major problem now is getting needed parts to repair the damage.
CITY WORKERS KEEP WATER FLOWING
July 22, 1990
Lawrence water treatment plant operators might be likened to the fairytale elf Rumpelstiltskin. Just as he could spin straw into gold, Lawrence’s water treatment operators turn murky, fishy, river water into sparkling clear drinking water perhaps better magic in a thirsty city than the elf’s. Ralph Gelvin Jr., water systems engineer for the city, said the nearly 75-year-old Kaw Water Treatment Plant at Third and Indiana streets the first built by M.T. Veach of Black and Veatch Consulting Engineers and the 12-year-old Clinton Water Treatment Plant, on Wakarusa south of 15th, “make” more than 20 million gallons of water each day.
WOODLING COLUMN
July 22, 1990
Notes and quotes while wondering how excited Siskel and Ebert are about reviewing that new movie with Brian Bosworth in it… I hate to see Gale Sayers stoop to it, but you’ll have to pay $5 to obtain an autograph of the former Kansas and Chicago Bears football star when he appears at the Kansas City Sports Collectors Show next Saturday afternoon …
PROF NOT SURPRISED BY NO-SHOWS FOR KUMC FEAR OF FLYING CLASS
July 22, 1990
A class to help people overcome their of flying didn’t get off the ground Saturday. But that didn’t surprise the teacher, Walt Gunn, a professor at the Kansas University Medical Center.
S LABOR SHOWS IN BILL AIDING DISABLED
July 22, 1990
With the expected passage of The Americans with Disabilities Act, Rud Turnbull will see the fruit of a year of labor. Turnbull, KU professor of special education and law, has kept close watch on the bill since helping Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, the bill sponsor, prepare it.
BILL COSBY ON BILL FOR CENTER OPENING
July 22, 1990
Bill Cosby and the Kansas City Symphony will appear Jan. 12, 1991, at the opening of the Johnson County Community College’s Cultural Education Center, officials announced Thursday. The comedian and the orchestra will play in the 1,400-seat theater, part of the $23 million, 163,000 square-foot building that includes a 400-seat theater and an experimental theater space.
2 GROUPS OFTEN AT ODDS FAVOR SALES TAX BOOST
July 22, 1990
A vote on a proposal to increase the sales tax in Lawrence has the support of two organizations that have often held opposing views on local political issues. The sales tax proposal, which will be voted on Aug. 7, is backed by the board of the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce and the leadership council from the Lawrence Association of Neighborhoods.
THE SALES TAX VOTE
July 22, 1990
When Lawrence voters go to the polls Aug. 7, they’ll be asked to approve an increase in the city’s sales tax rate. But the real issue, city officials say, is not the tax itself but whether residents want to beef up the city’s police and fire departments.
LYME DISEASE VACCINE AVAILABLE FOR DOGS
July 22, 1990
Rover is getting a new vaccine. Local veterinarians now can vaccinate dogs against Lyme disease, 15 years after the infectious disease was first discovered.
ELDEN TEFFT, MAN OF BRONZE, RETIRES FROM KU
July 22, 1990
For most of us, projects that take a month or two can seem endless. Our rapid-fire society demands instant gratification and imposes do-or-die deadlines. Actors often spend as few as three weeks in rehearsal for a musical. Artists can churn out paintings in a matter of days or months, depending on the size or subject. Voltaire wrote his comic novel “Candide” in three days.
HOSPITAL REPORT
July 22, 1990
BIRTHS Ken and Robin Campbell, Lawrence, a girl, Saturday.
SALES RESULTS PLEASE STORES AT FACTORY OUTLET CENTER
July 22, 1990
Three months after opening its doors to customers, the Lawrence Riverfront Plaza is starting to firm up. The furniture is in place. The signage is up. And all of shops on the street-level floor of the center have been leased.
S RETIREMENT NOT A SURPRISE AT KU
July 22, 1990
The retirement of Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan didn’t come as a complete surprise at the Kansas University School of Law. Robert Jerry, law school dean, said Brennan’s retirement announcement Friday came several weeks after Brennan canceled a visit to KU that had been scheduled for September. Brennan cited health problems as the reason for canceling the visit, one of the reasons given for his retirement from the Supreme Court.
TRAIL PROJECT SPRUCING UP CITY PARK
July 22, 1990
Lawrence residents soon will have a cleaned-up outdoor trail suitable for walking and bike riding because of two Boy Scouts who wanted to open up a seldom-used portion of a local park. Fritz Keel and Jon Holmberg, members of Lawrence Boy Scout Troop No. 60, wanted to do a cleaning, clearing and building project for the community as part of their requirement toward becoming Eagle Scouts.
APPRAISAL TEAM WILL BE RECHECKING DOWNTOWN
July 22, 1990
An inspection team from the Douglas County appraiser’s office will be in downtown Lawrence this week gathering on-site information at businesses for the purpose of setting property values for next year’s taxes. Information gathered by a seven-member appraisal team will be used in setting fair market property values, which will be used for taxes billed in November, 1991.