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When you buy a car, do you buy American?

Response Percent Votes
Where the manufacturer is based doesn’t matter to me.
 
41% 287
No, I won’t buy domestic cars.
 
30% 213
Yes, American only.
 
26% 186
I don’t buy cars.
 
1% 13
Total 699

Comments

Marion Lynn 4 years, 11 months ago

Just did a deal on a 1941 Packard Super Eight 160.

If you have further questions, ask the man who owns one.

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lawrence45 4 years, 11 months ago

it's only money!! we cannot take it with us to the grave!!

burn that gas.

long live

DETROIT MUSCLE

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TacoBob 4 years, 11 months ago

I only buy cars and trucks designed and engineered overseas. Where they are built is immaterial.

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bronze 4 years, 11 months ago

i think about it at least.

especially now with Ford & some GM hybrids available.

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Starlight 4 years, 11 months ago

If you must pry... $59.87 property tax $761.00/yr business use, 300,000 liability and comp/collision(lien requirement) $244 payments for 36mos @ 5.9%(good credit gets you good rates even on 7 year old cars). Even with the loan interest I'm paying the total is far less than the Kelly blue book value. Oil/filter change by self for about $30. Period. You drive your lead sled 30,000 miles @ 20mpg(I think I'm being generous there) you burn 1500 gallons. I get 72.1mpg I burn 416 gallons. Difference 1084 gallons. At $2 a gallon the difference pays for the car in under four and a half years. $4 gas, it's making the car payments plus, then all gravy. There is a guy refurbishing the batteries for $600 plus $50 per bad stick, of which there are usually no more than one or two. There is also the option of getting a salvaged battery for $250(another model's battery fits too). I don't have to worry about it for another four years or 75,000 miles as the manufacturer extended the battery warranty to 10 years(from being put in service)/150,000 miles. If I wanted to tinker there are garage mechanics turning these into PHEVs. Using the 58.5cents/mile rate from latter part of 2008 over 30,000 miles you get $17,550 written off business earnings. I'm glad you wouldn't want to buy this car. I'm happy so many people think like you or it likely would have cost me thousands more. It's my understanding it cost the manufacture over $50,000 to build and I got it for less than a fifth that cost. I like the high tech. I think I'll go check my flux capacitor. Back to the future!

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llama726 4 years, 11 months ago

Yeah, don't buy that battery replacement for the hybrid, just invest $400 a month for 5 years and you'll have $3 million. I read it on the internet.

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Marion Lynn 4 years, 11 months ago

Starlight (Anonymous) says…

Not to mention the write-off on taxes of 30,000 miles of driving and the 1084 gallons of gas I didn't have to buy."

Marion writes:

OK, what were your property taxes,insurance . maintainence and car payments for the period you discuss?

And where does "1084 gallons of gas I didn't have to buy..." come from?

As compared to what?

And what will battery replacement in your hybrid cost(Assuming that you are indeed driving a hybrid?)

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llama726 4 years, 11 months ago

"If you average a rate of return of 12 percent (which is doable), your money will grow to $2.4 million. Do you still want the car?”

--That is not doable. Sorry. A staggered investment of $23,814 over a little more than 5 years is gonna turn into $2.4 million?

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bronze 4 years, 11 months ago

makes owned: Volkswagen Saab BMW Audi Fiat MG Volvo Pontiac Ford JEEP

so about 30% domestic only 1970 - 2009

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bronze 4 years, 11 months ago

have never bought a NEW American car.

have bought USED American car(s).

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Starlight 4 years, 11 months ago

The Ford Fusion is a good start. 41mpg EPA estimate. Driver attitude is a big part as a recent test drive pairing a Nascar driver and the premier hypermiler Gerdes got 80mpg from the Fusion. Of course Marion would point out that you don't get the thrill of pumping all that gas without putting the pedal to the metal.

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G_E 4 years, 11 months ago

In the 4 short years I've been driving, I've only had two cars, one domestic and one import. The domestic was a 1997 Mercury Sable, and it was a good car. A little bit too soccer mom for my tastes, but still solid. It was pushing 175,000 when it finally died - which was due not to a breakdown, but to an unfortunate collision involving some sand, a tight curve, and a concrete median.

After my baby Sable was a wreck, I got a 2003 Toyota Corolla, and I adore it. It has about 119,000 miles on it currently. I love that it only costs me about $23 to fill it up! (Although I wind up at the gas station just about as often as I did with my old car - simply because the tank is about 11 gallons as opposed to 16ish - but I spend less money each time.)

I think American automakers do make some great cars that get overlooked, but they've lost the confidence of their customers...and unfortunately, I don't know if they're going to have the luxury of taking the time to gain that confidence and trust back before they all go completely under.

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fools_gold_is_he 4 years, 11 months ago

Bronze/Sven/Ocean/Cool/Spiderman is proud of his stable of imports....just ask him.

Because he likes the panache of driving an import, and he thinks American corporations are all evil. There might be a republican on the payroll somewhere

Does this so-called self-described liberal really care about American Labor. Nyet!

To him it is all about self-interest, be it involving Architecture licensing, LHS practice field lawsuits, service on the Historic Resources Commission, or cars.

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none2 4 years, 11 months ago

jrlii (Anonymous) says…

Detroit lost it back in the '70s when they started devoting a substantial amount of their R&D budget to planned obsolescence: IE how to limit the life of their vehicles while Toyota, Honda & c. just kept making theirs better, and are now making cars which if they don't last 250,000 miles, they have been abused, while with a lot of Detroit iron people are still surprised if you get much more than 100,000 miles out of 'em.

Exactly which American vehicles have planned obsolesce? Curious minds want to know.

I have two Dodge minivans. One is at 250,000. The other is at 190,000.

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gphawk89 4 years, 11 months ago

Every car I've bought for the past 25 years have been American. All two of them.

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Starlight 4 years, 11 months ago

Lose. Lose the extra 'o' please. Then there's an 'o' on the loose. This misspelling is going to make me lose my mind. Cows get loose, you have loose women, and you can loose an arrow. You can also lose an arrow or lose track of it.

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jrlii 4 years, 11 months ago

I gave up on Detroit years ago, and at that, I probably kept buying their products longer than I should. Of course my car WAS built in Indiana, but the company was not headquartered there. . .

Detroit lost it back in the '70s when they started devoting a substantial amount of their R&D budget to planned obsolescence: IE how to limit the life of their vehicles while Toyota, Honda & c. just kept making theirs better, and are now making cars which if they don't last 250,000 miles, they have been abused, while with a lot of Detroit iron people are still surprised if you get much more than 100,000 miles out of 'em.

Now, there are exceptions, my old-enough-to-vote-and-then-some Chevy pickup (there still isn't a non-Detroit brand selling trucks that size here) is pushing a quarter million, miles with no sign of quitting, even though the body is getting pretty rusty. And somewhere around someone is still driving the elderly C-10, that a friend rolled over the odometer enough times to loose track, 400K? 500K? he had no idea why it kept going, but it did. . .

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Marion Lynn 4 years, 11 months ago

Starlight (Anonymous) says…

"Your upgrades to your dinosaur would probably have gone a long ways to purchasing one of these."

Marion writes:

Maybe so but why would I want to?

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Starlight 4 years, 11 months ago

Not to mention the write-off on taxes of 30,000 miles of driving and the 1084 gallons of gas I didn't have to buy.

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Starlight 4 years, 11 months ago

For your erudition Marion: I bought the car used. No huge payment, insurance or tax. It is a 2002 model. I paid less than half it's new sale price and two thousand under Kelly blue book's value of 66% of it's original value and it regularly sells for 75% to those not paying attention to numbers. Care to guess what it will be worth when gas hits four dollars again? Your upgrades to your dinosaur would probably have gone a long ways to purchasing one of these. Might be hard to do though as only 18,000 were ever made. Jay Leno has one if that tells you anything about it's likely appreciation. Your arguments are very hollow. Damn happy motoring, thank you!

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Marion Lynn 4 years, 11 months ago

Starlight (Anonymous) says…

You won't be running into me at the gas station Marion. My last tank averaged 72mpg;)"

Marion writes:

Prolly correct, there, Starlight but then you won't see me making the huge car payments, paying the high insurance premiums and punitive personal property tax bills that you have, either!

By driving my Strassenkreuzers, I am actually helping the environment much more than you; recycling; using what is already here, hence no pollution contribution from building a new car or the batteries which are undoubtedly part of your vehicular package. I contribute to employment by having my car serviced and maintained at a local shop.

I am not negatively contributing to the economy by over-extending a credit line to pay for a car; I pay cash or trade.

You are or have been tied to loans in which you are upside down the moment you drive your car off the lot.

I updated with modern electronic ignition , anti-knock sensor, no lead 440 heads giving a CR of 10.5 to 1 on pump gas, a 2:76 Sure-Grip,, dual exhaust and an Edelbrock AVS set just above lean idle roll and re-jetted for maximum fuel economy.

I may burn a bit more gas but I'm not mortgaged up to my kiester to the bank in car payments and after all, what is gasoline for?

LOL!

My car becomes more valuable every day, while yours on average loses 70% of its value in the first 3-4 years, depending on vehicle type and mileage driven:

http://www.finalcall.com/artman/publish/article_2267.shtml

From the citation:

"The average car payment is $378 over 63 months. I tend to work with people whose car payment is over $500 per month. Let’s say that you invested $378 every month, instead of making car payments from age 30 to age 65 (35 years). If you average a rate of return of 12 percent (which is doable), your money will grow to $2.4 million. Do you still want the car?"

Happy motoring!

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Starlight 4 years, 11 months ago

You won't be running into me at the gas station Marion. My last tank averaged 72mpg;)

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Marion Lynn 4 years, 11 months ago

overthemoon (Anonymous) says…

"Down the drain with the nostalgia for daddy's chrysler"

Marion writes:

That Chrysler with a capital "C", to you, overthemoon and this ain't my Daddy's Chrysler; it's mine,.all 383 cubic inches and 3785 lbs of it.

20 mpg on th highway or better with the air on.

Don't do anything foolish like get hit by it in your pathetic little $40K Asianmobile...................................

http://connorsmotorcar.com/66Chrysler/DSCF0040.JPG

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overthemoon 4 years, 11 months ago

"The only un-American buy is a hybrid."

So gas guzzling is as american as apple pie? Reducing gas consumption is the one of the best ways to reduce dependence on saudi oil. So how is that unamerican? If the US car companies had been paying attention for the past 20 years, we'd have a whole array of hybrids or better to chose from. So much for american ingenuity. Down the drain with the nostalgia for daddy's chrysler.

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tangential_reasoners_anonymous 4 years, 11 months ago

Why frame the question in terms of nationalism?

Nepotism will do.

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demonfury 4 years, 11 months ago

If I was going to buy a new car, it would be a Volvo, or a Saab. The swedes have been doing it better than anyone else for decades.

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labmonkey 4 years, 11 months ago

Hmm... Buick rates at the top in quality this year (tied for the top among all brands), the Chevy Malibu sells like hotcakes because it compares well with the Camary, and Chevrolet makes a sports car that is able to compete side by side with a Lamborgini for less than a third of the cost. Yea, domestic automakers make a horrible product. As for trucks, the MO is the Nissan Titan is the best you can get for the money, but if you can afford it, the GMC Sierra is the best period.

I cannot wait for the Chevy Camaro and Chevy Volt.

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parrotuya 4 years, 11 months ago

It is so sad to see America's industrial base in a state of decline. The "robber barons" who run our corporations are too blame. I hope their kidneys fail!

DOWn, baby, DOWn!

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cheeseburger 4 years, 11 months ago

summerguuurl008 (Anonymous) says… I have a Delorian. I'll sell it to you.

If you can't even spell it correctly, I'm not buying it from you!

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powershopper 4 years, 11 months ago

On my third BMW. Not only are they built well but they hold their value. I sold my last one with 100k miles on it and still made 14k. In that 100k miles the only maintenance I ever had to do was replace the brake pads. No tune up, no major engine repairs and it still ran like it was brand new.

My last American car was a 1998 Chrysler LeBaron. It blew a gasket with 60k miles on it and quit running completely at 80k miles. That pretty much spoiled it for me in terms of American cars.

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Chris Ogle 4 years, 11 months ago

I have a 73 Chevy PU, 78 Jeep J10 PU, and an 87 Jeep Pioneer (little one) PU..... They are still drivers... AC still works on the Chevy. But I usually drive my Hyundai Sonata...

Guess which one sits outside..... the Sonata... (must love to scape ice and snow)

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jonas_opines 4 years, 11 months ago

summerguuurl008 (Anonymous) says…

"I have a Delorian. I'll sell it to you."

Is it the model with the flux capacitor?

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phoenixforce 4 years, 11 months ago

The only un-American buy is a hybrid.

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Practicality 4 years, 11 months ago

I find it really interesting that some of the posters that complained about Wal-Mart drive foreign vehicles.

I agree with the poster about Ford Trucks. Pretty good vehicle, but I believe the Toyota Tundra and the Nissan Titan will give the F-150 a run for its money. I was outside of Chanute the other day and saw a definite good ol' boy driving a Titan. I believe US truck makers are in trouble when they start to lose even the good ol' boy market.

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thebcman 4 years, 11 months ago

if american auto makers would put out a decent product, i would buy it. until then japan gets my money.

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summerguuurl008 4 years, 11 months ago

I have a Delorian. I'll sell it to you.

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jumpin_catfish 4 years, 11 months ago

My Park Avenue has 203,000, still runs great and you can't beat Dynaride. But I have no objections to Toyota, Honda or German or Swiss cars.

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edjayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

Combine GM, Chrysler, and Ford into one company: Domestic Motors (DM)

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edjayhawk 4 years, 11 months ago

I have a Saab with 250,000 on it. Need I say more.

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gsxr600 4 years, 11 months ago

The idea of "foreign" and domestic cars is highly skewed. Toyota's are really more American than GM and Ford automobiles. Look it up.

" autie (Anonymous) says…

both. I have a ford and a couple of volvos. I'll buy american when they make one that doesn't fall the hell apart after 100K miles. "


Ford owns Volvo, by the way...

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Richard Heckler 4 years, 11 months ago

The former big three have been manufacturing cars and parts abroad for many years.

So which ones are american made is the question?

Corporate america does not have to pay taxes on profits if goods are manufactured abroad. What a sweet deal while they screw the people out of jobs who made them what they were who BTW who just happen to be americans.

Again which ones are american made is the question?

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logicsound04 4 years, 11 months ago

This question is past it's time.

With globalization, there are very few, if any, manufacturers who's entire operation is based in one country.

For example, Toyota, a Japanese automaker, has more manufacturing plants in the United States than does GM, an American automaker.

So which one of those cars would be considered "American"?

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AlligatorMama 4 years, 11 months ago

We only buy Toyota. Our Camry has 225,000 miles on it and is running like new! We've had a Corolla and now have a Rav4, they are all fantastic, well built, reliable and safe.

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kmat 4 years, 11 months ago

Glad to hear about your Ranger, autie. My Ranger is 18 years old and has 170K on it. So, it appears it will still have a lot of years left in it.

Just bought a Toyota Corolla this spring. The gas mileage is incredible! Before this I had a Nissan Altima. I used to have to fill it up every 4-5 days (work in Shawnee) and it held almost 15 gallons. This Corolla only holds 11.5 gallons and I'm only filling it up every 7-8 days. This is my first Toyota, but I think I'll be buying them in the future now.

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Original_Me 4 years, 11 months ago

Correction: American's aren't making America like we ought to.

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Original_Me 4 years, 11 months ago

"American components. Russian components. All made in Taiwan!" ~ That space cowboy in 'Armageddon'.

I'll say this about buying "American" & being "made in America" ~ American's aren't making America like it ought to....

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Liberty_One 4 years, 11 months ago

My S-10 with 167K miles is still running well. But I'll buy whatever's the best for the price.

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Andrew Stahmer 4 years, 11 months ago

Are our "empty" busses American made? (Hey, if nothing else; they're nice and roomy!!)

HA!!

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denak 4 years, 11 months ago

If I had the luxery of buying a new car, where it was built probably would come into play somewhere in the equation but it wouldn't be a determining factor.

However, since I do not have the luxery of buying a new car, and probably never will, where the car is made does not really matter. It depends primarily on what I can afford at the time.

With that said, three years ago, I bought a 1991 Toyota Previa for $750 . Today it has over 240,000 miles on it and it is still going strong. I think that speaks for the quality that one gets when one buys a Toyota. The only drawback to this vehicle is that it is probably single handedly the cause of global warming but other than that, it is a good car.

Dena

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jobohe 4 years, 11 months ago

I've owned American cars and imports. The only American manufacturer I would consider now is the one that is still independent, Ford. I don't like the degree to which the government is involving itself in business. It's easy to blame Obama for this, but the bailouts started with Bush.

Chrysler and GM are both icons with rich histories, but if the time has come for one or both of them to fail, they must fail. Businesses don't run for long on nostalgia.

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deskboy04 4 years, 11 months ago

I will only buy the Jeep Wrangler...as American as you can get!

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flamingdragon 4 years, 11 months ago

my 1963 dodge has already outlasted all of your toyotas and other crap "assembled in america" with profits going to Japan.

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autie 4 years, 11 months ago

kmat, I have a ford ranger with almost 250K on it. Still runs great and is in good shape. Our first volvo had darn near 300K on it and had to be taken out of service after it had been totaled..for a second time..kid drivers. and the motor was still fine..just didn't look very good with the driver side back door hanging out the passenger side.

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LA_Ex 4 years, 11 months ago

As a generalization, Americans just don't put the same quality into the cars that we see coming from Germany and Japan. The American auto industry and the auto unions only have themselves to blame for the condition they are in. I've had 1 Audi, 2 VWs, 2 Subarus and 3 Toyotas. Other than a seatbelt recall, none of them ever went to the shop. I've had 6 or 7 American cars from all 3 manufacturers. Every single one of them has had something break, countless recalls, overall fit and finish issues, etc... My past British, French and Italian cars have all had breakdowns too, but that's almost expected. lol

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average 4 years, 11 months ago

Hard to say. My current Toyota was made in a UAW plant in California. The Dodge it replaced had a Mitsubishi engine and was assembled in Mexico.

I will say this. The Toyota was the most fuel-efficient car made in the US in its model year. If a thousand dollars or so of its purchase went to Japan, I reckon I sort of prefer that to several thousand of my dollars (in increased gas consumption) going to Saudi terror funding, Hugo Chavez, and Nigerian rebels. Just me.

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cthulhu_4_president 4 years, 11 months ago

"When you buy a car, do you buy American?"

Yes, I buy Toyotas............in America.

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kmat 4 years, 11 months ago

Ford trucks good. Domestic cars bad unless you want to replace them every 100K miles. And not all foreign cars are good either. Toyota, Honda, Volvo, VW are great manufacturers.

Autie - my father in law had a Volvo wagon that made it over 300K. He finally gave it to a charity organization at that point. He had driven it for over 15 years.

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autie 4 years, 11 months ago

both. I have a ford and a couple of volvos. I'll buy american when they make one that doesn't fall the hell apart after 100K miles.

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kuhusker 4 years, 11 months ago

I am spending $25,000 for a new vehicle, not choosing what sports team to root for. American or not, it makes no difference. I want quality and reliability.

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