Advertisement

Archive for Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Officials upset over reassembly of Varsity House

The old Varsity House is being reconstructed at the northwest corner of 11th and Indiana streets on the site of the new Varsity House Apartment complex. A deal was struck between the developers, City Hall and the Lawrence Preservation Alliance that the former boarding home, where college athletes used to stay, would be moved to a corner of the property. Once reassembled, the structure will serve as a boarding house next to the new apartment development. But concerns have arisen about how much of the original house will remain.

The old Varsity House is being reconstructed at the northwest corner of 11th and Indiana streets on the site of the new Varsity House Apartment complex. A deal was struck between the developers, City Hall and the Lawrence Preservation Alliance that the former boarding home, where college athletes used to stay, would be moved to a corner of the property. Once reassembled, the structure will serve as a boarding house next to the new apartment development. But concerns have arisen about how much of the original house will remain.

October 23, 2012

Advertisement

An old home may spur a new battle between Lawrence City Hall and one of the city’s more prominent developers.

A pair of city commissioners said they are upset with how Lawrence developer Thomas Fritzel is following through on a deal to rebuild the old Varsity House at 11th and Indiana streets. Fritzel and city commissioners last year agreed to a compromise that allowed his development company to move the 1900s-era Varsity House to make way for a new apartment complex.

But now commissioners are expressing concern that the Varsity House isn’t being returned to the site but rather a replica of the house with largely new materials is being constructed.

“The truth of the matter is, something has to be made right up there,” City Commissioner Mike Amyx said. “The building that is being built up there is not the same building that was taken down.”

Amyx said he wants the city to consider levying a large fine against Fritzel for deviating from an approved site plan. Mayor Bob Schumm said he also wants to have a discussion about how the city could force the project to come into compliance with the agreement that stated the “existing structure” of the Varsity House would be “relocated.” Technically, the city can deny an occupancy permit for the 50-unit apartment building that Fritzel is constructing adjacent to the Varsity House, if the city believes the site plan agreement has not been fulfilled.

“I want to give him the opportunity to address the issues, and then we’ll see where it goes,” Schumm said. “But I’m concerned that if we allow this to continue, we’re sending out a very bad message to developers that rules are bendable and we’re not really that serious about enforcing the rules.”

But Fritzel is speaking out against the idea that he is not upholding his end of the Varsity House compromise.

“I would say we absolutely are following the agreement,” Fritzel said. “I totally disagree with anyone who says we are not.”

This is a controversy that has been percolating since last winter. In December, several community members expressed surprise at how Fritzel had chosen to move the house. Instead of moving the house in one piece to its new site on the lot, Fritzel’s crews essentially chopped the house into three large pieces and hauled it off-site on semitrailers.

City commissioners said they were surprised too.

“The next thing we know, the house is being dismantled and carted away,” Schumm said.

But Fritzel said city leaders shouldn’t have been surprised. He said he met with members of the city’s Planning Department before work began to dismantle the house. He said he told them a consultant hired to determine how to move the house strongly recommended the house not be moved in one piece.

Unbeknownst to Fritzel when he bought the house from Kansas University in a public auction, the house was built using an old-style “balloon framing” method. The framing style meant the house had no headers above the windows or doors and lacked stabilizing floor plates.

“There absolutely was a concern that the house was going to collapse if we tried to move it in one piece,” Fritzel said. “And we told the city that.”

Attempts to clarify what the city was told about the need to disassemble the house weren’t successful Monday afternoon.

The house began to draw attention again this month as crews began to reassemble the house. Members of the public said the Varsity House — which gained its name by serving as a boarding house for the Kansas University varsity football team in the mid-1900s — appeared to be a new house simply made to look old.

The house has all new siding and windows and will have a new roof when it is completed as well. But Fritzel said he told city officials all along that the exterior components of the house had deteriorated to the point that they could not be re-used.

Dennis Brown, president of the Lawrence Preservation Alliance, said his group did know the roof and siding likely wouldn’t be saved. But Brown said Monday that he expected interior staircases, window trim and other materials to be saved to a greater degree than they have been.

“It is basically a new house that uses some salvaged framing materials,” Brown said.

The house does use large amounts of old two-by-fours and floor joists from the original structure, but often times those pieces are directly next to new framing that Fritzel said is needed to better support the house and meet current codes.

Fritzel, who gave a tour of the house to the Journal-World, said the project has done a lot to respect the history of the house, which was built in 1908 but is not listed on any historic registers and is not receiving any historic tax credits. The elements include:

l Saving stone and wood from the front porch to ensure the front of the house has an authentic feel to the original;

l Making exact replicas of window trim that were too rotten to be re-used.

l Replacing the siding of the house with actual cedar shingles rather than the more modern method of using concrete composite replica shingles.

l Interior trim and woodwork that is more historically appropriate than many of the 1970s-style doors and hardware that were installed in the house by KU.

“If people would just give us a little more time to do our work, I think they’ll be really impressed,” Fritzel said. “My number one goal is to enhance the environment up there. I feel the Varsity House will be a true enhancement. I really do believe that.”

Commissioners, though still aren’t sure it was what they were promised.

“I can just say that I’m not very happy about how this has happened,” Schumm said. “I would not have voted in favor of this project if I thought what we were going to get was a replica of the Varsity House.”

Commissioners will debate the subject at their 6:35 p.m. meeting tonight at City Hall.

Comments

auntmimi210 2 years ago

Oh my God, whaaaat ? I'm so surprised. Nobody saw this coming.

9

Richard Heckler 2 years ago

Give them more time and the city commission will do nothing. It is NOT unusual as commissioners think for site plan violations to take place. Most often these violations are ignored.

Look at Baur Farms...... one monster site plan violation. Where did new urbanism go? Probably could not find tenants.

3

happyp 2 years ago

Really? Did the commissioners really expect Fritzel to do what he said? Let's think back, gentlemen, the Oread, the apartments with the artificial grass. Why does the city commission continue to allow Fritzel to get by with these things? I assume I will allowed the same privilege when I build an addition to my house. Please think long and hard about the recreation center in Northwest Lawrence. How can he be trusted? Please think about the large fine and some type of punishment for continually ignoring his agreements.

14

JackMcKee 2 years ago

Mr. Tower of Terror. The plastic grass king. Where's Cramwell? Hmmmm. I wonder. The tackiest builder in Lawrence. He didn't follow through on his promise? You don't say. Idiots.

11

kujayhawk7476 2 years ago

Give me a break, Schumm! Lawrence is not the "mecca" of history and preserved buildings! It is time to move into the 21st century! There is a word in the dictionary everywhere in the world except for Lawrence; that word is 'progress'! Embrace it!

5

Jeff Barclay 2 years ago

Fun news to read, but a very silly debate. I am sure an injunction could stop this project for the next 20 years. “I can just say that I’m not very happy about how this has happened,” Schumm said. “I would not have voted in favor of this project if I thought what we were going to get was a replica of the Varsity House.” I thought Schumm's complaint was that he wanted the original.

0

jhawkinsf 2 years ago

This has been a charade from the beginning. Nothing more than actors playing their part, reading from their scripts. Both sides deserve their respective Oscars.

3

LWbored 2 years ago

Fritzel sounds like he is taking care of this ugly building just fine. The city should just relax and let the man take care of his tiny, 108 year-old eye sore.

2

Sherry Warren 2 years ago

I can't wait for this construction catastrophe to be over. These donkeys have been messing up the road and traffic for too long. Yeah yeah...I know - I am in a big ole rush to get up the hill so I can isolate myself in my ivory tower.

0

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 2 years ago

"Unbeknownst to Fritzel when he bought the house from Kansas University in a public auction, the house was built using an old-style “balloon framing” method. The framing style meant the house had no headers above the windows or doors and lacked stabilizing floor plates.

“There absolutely was a concern that the house was going to collapse if we tried to move it in one piece,” Fritzel said. “And we told the city that.”"

That's complete BS. First, anyone who knows anything about building techniques in use when this house was constructed should have known that this building was built with balloon framing. And there have been countless such houses moved without their collapsing.

4

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 2 years ago

And you'd be very wrong-- as usual.

1

Catalano 2 years ago

You don't know Bozo, but, then he already pointed that out above.

0

paulveer 2 years ago

I have extensive experience locally regarding structural framing, and what bozo says here is absolutely correct. These things are very easy to determine, and among the first looked at when considering purchase or renovation.

1

Armored_One 2 years ago

From what I read about the project back when it was first reported, it was implied that the structure was extremely old and for the most part not kept in any sort of reliable condition. Given the issues with balloon framing then combining that with 108 years of disrepair, dismantling it was most likely the best option.

0

cowboy 2 years ago

Any one ever remodeled anything ? Thats how Ive made my living and when you start tearing into things you never know where it may lead. These same a$$hats that are griping from the city would be over there telling them to bring it up to code if they left it as it was. Might as well do it correctly if youre going to bother erecting it.

4

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 2 years ago

Sure, there likely would have been components of the house that couldn't be salvaged, but it appears that there was never any serious intent or attempt to salvage much of anything.

In other words, when he agreed to save the house, he was lying.

7

lawrencereporter 2 years ago

Thomas Fritzel certainly has trashed his family's name. It was once known for quality and honesty. Thomas Fritzel is the family's appointed leader, he is driven by greed and dishonesty. If any commissioners chose to defend Fritzel's blatant dishonesty and lack of respect for the law regarding this project it might be time to investigate their relationship(s) to Fritzel. Three strikes and your out, when is enough, enough.

5

JackMcKee 2 years ago

Cowboy, what are your thoughts on plastic grass?

1

cowboy 2 years ago

For the Record Jack , plastic grass sucks , but thats not what were talking about here is it ?

2

Michael Shaw 2 years ago

This project has made Indiana street difficult and dangerous for pedestrians. The building itself significantly differs from the drawings shown to the planning commission. And now the are building a parody of the house they agreed to restore. A model project.

2

kansanbygrace 2 years ago

Balloon-framing was the dominant style of residential construction when Varsity House was built. There was no platform construction, with floor and top plates between the floors for another 40 years or so. Dozens of those houses have been successfully moved in Lawrence and Douglas County, and thousands across the midwest. Thomas Fritzell could have consulted any of the craftsmen or the structure movers who have done this work and become educated on the structural style and how to move it. He probably didn't think of that. Being the son of a builder does not necessarily mean all the father's knowledge has been transplanted into the brain of the less experienced, though usually well-intending son. Lawrence "developers" have a long history of doing whatever they feel like, regardless of the knowledge they ignore from more skilled and experienced tradesmen.
All hat, no hammer, to paraphrase Lyndon Johnson.

6

spiderd 2 years ago

Your level of caring is not really relevant. Regardless of anyone's opinion on the merits of the project a deal was made and broken. The only question is who all was in on it?

5

zackattackku 2 years ago

Actually yes. You can move a 3 story wood-frame structure. Look up house moving. I have seen images of large wooden mansions on cribbing going up the sides of shear cliffs to be moved to a new site. It was done with one house where the scholarship halls are located. They can even move 10 story masonry buildings. It can be done and Fritzel should have known better given his family's construction background.

0

JackMcKee 2 years ago

Yes. Cowboy, I believe it is exactly what we're talking about.

1

irvan moore 2 years ago

these are the people the city want to partner with on a new rec center?

4

Mike Myers 2 years ago

Very good point. I think it's time for the city to back out of that deal. Or perhaps they should make the deal, then break it.

0

cowboy 2 years ago

Sold at public auction Not listed on historic register No taxpayer subsidy = the whiners have no standing

Id like to see the site plan "contract" I suspect its not worth the paper its written on

0

JackMcKee 2 years ago

Sadly I think Fritzel is not a person I'd trust with the rec center.

4

flyin_squirrel 2 years ago

Completely agree. HRC needs to go.

0

zackattackku 2 years ago

The house was in far better shape structurally than most of the houses owned by the local slumlords.

0

Liberty275 2 years ago

So one week we close down an apartment and kicked people out because the landowner did not make adequate repairs, then the next week government is complaining that another owner put new siding and a new roof on his boarding house.

"Any one ever remodeled anything ?"

Exactly. Old buildings need to be updated from time to time. If it's a government-recognized landmark, you hire the $200/hour craftsmen from back east. If it's some place you bought at auction, you hire the $25 yokels. Or you do it yourself. All you need is a sawzall and enough money to fix the stuff you tear up.

0

Fatty_McButterpants 2 years ago

Heaven forbid an old, rundown building be updated to modern standards. Seriously folks, not every old building in Lawrence needs to be preserved because something happened there once.

4

MartyT 2 years ago

This article is about one building, not "every old building".

0

lawrencereporter 2 years ago

“I would say we absolutely are following the agreement,” Fritzel said. “I totally disagree with anyone who says we are not.”

Who's "we"

1

FlintHawk 2 years ago

Thanks for the video, RubyV. I recently returned to Lawrence after a l-o-n-g time away. Not only do I still miss Fraser, I often think that I'm living in a suburban town located almost anywhere in the US. When we disrespect and lose our past, we lose our uniqueness. God forbid that we spend money on preservation when we can spend it on strip malls that will soon be vacant. = [

3

zackattackku 2 years ago

I helped Chris Stone do that video.

0

skinny 2 years ago

I was in and out of that house the last 25 years. I can't wait to walk into the basement to see how original it is now! Opps, oh wait, what basement???? I guess they decided not to have a basement in the quote, unquote new Varsity House.

The City of Lawrence better levy Mr. Fritzel some big fines for not placing the house back original as was agreed upon!

3

DennisReynolds 2 years ago

That building was a dilapidated POS that probably should have been condemned. I think it is a joke that the city commission thought requiring it to be moved and reconstructed rather than just torn down was a good idea in the first place. Typical I guess...

0

Ken Lassman 2 years ago

Says who? Had you ever been in it? I worked in it in the early 90s on a project and it was built like a tank. I can't imagine that it had gone that far downhill before being "refurbished" as it looked pretty much the same every time I drove by it.

0

DennisReynolds 2 years ago

Perhaps your eyesight changed in the last 20 years

0

Ken Lassman 2 years ago

I'm not talking exterior--the structure was built like a rock.

0

Pastor_Bedtime 2 years ago

See where cronyism gets you? As a community, we all lose. Time to re-level the playing field and give other folks an opportunity in this two-developer town.

4

scaramouchepart2 2 years ago

It's a three developer town. With the economy down these three believe the city owes them a living.

0

JackMcKee 2 years ago

This building needed fixing and the grass needed plasticizing. An Amazing man that Fritzel. He can build a Tower if Terror on year and turn grass into plastic the next.

2

Budgets_Smudgets 2 years ago

And remember, the so-called "rec-center" is being proposed as a "no-bid" project.

Trust us, they say.

2

flyin_squirrel 2 years ago

In my opinion, keeping the varsity house was a waste and why we need to get rid of the HRC. But with that said, Fritzel pulled another one on the city.

Schumm and Amyx carry some of the blame for this disaster, as well as Mr Brown and the HRC. They all approved moving this non-historic house to the corner. They all approved the design with this house 10 feet away from the apartment, and said it looks good. And they all assumed Fritzel would build the house the way "they intended" not Fritzel.

For Amyx, Schumm and Brown to complain is an absolute joke. At some point when you continue to make deals with the devil, you will get burned.

Fool me once (Oread), shame on you. Fool me twice (Fake grass), shame on me. Fool me thrice (Varsity), shame on Lawrence. Fool me a fourth time (Rec center).....

3

Mark Kostner 2 years ago

After I left Lawrence, I lived in Boulder for awhile. Back in the late 70's and 1980s to get around growth control laws, developers would buy old houses and build condos and apartments around them. At least back then they'd make a superficial effort to make the apartments look like the houses they surrounded, although it was still obvious what they were doing. In this case the new building looks nothing like the Varsity House and I wonder why the developer even bothered to save the place. This looks strange. He should have built the new place in the same style and made the place blend in.

1

flyin_squirrel 2 years ago

This is why the HRC needs to go in Lawrence. The HRC said we needed to save this structure, which if anyone walked thru it they would have seen there was nothing worth saving in this house. Our HRC is used to stop any new developments, rather than save worthwhile historic structures.

This project will forever be a visual joke as to what our HRC has become. And unfortunately most visitors to KU will get to enjoy the joke.

0

skinny 2 years ago

The City of Lawrence needs to stop the construction until Mr. Fritzel gets with the program!

2

JMN 2 years ago

I'm so sick of the trolls constantly whining and complaining on here. Where was everybody that loved this house so much when it was falling to pieces the last several decades? You guys love to hate on Fritzel, Compton, and other similar businessmen because they are successful but they're the only ones doing anything to improve the aesthetics of these neighborhoods. Instead of throwing temper tantrums over every little thing these guys do why don't you get off your computers and do something about these so-called landmarks that you love so much. Pathetic losers cowering behind their monitors naysaying and not doing anything productive. Shame on you.

1

Gareth Skarka 2 years ago

Yet again, the rallying cry that people hate these guys "because they are successful."

When will you folks get it through your heads? What we hate is people who don't play by the rules. There's a big difference between "success" and "cheating."

5

scaramouchepart2 2 years ago

Improving the aesthetics of the neighborhood. It's a barracks. Blocky, no aesthetics what so ever. As someone said earlier, we look like suburbia anywhere. Big business looking to locate here will be frightened off by these aesthetics. QOL are in the top 5 for a business looking to locate and are precious three are killing that for there own cheap build big bucks greed.

0

MarcoPogo 2 years ago

"I'm so sick of the trolls constantly whining and complaining on here... Pathetic losers cowering behind their monitors naysaying and not doing anything productive."

Ironic Post of the Day!

0

lawrencereporter 2 years ago

Fritzel probably can't remember the last time he told the truth. The city knows he can't be trusted, he proves that on a daily basis with his own actions. Why are the city commissioners continuing to talk with Fritzel about the recreation center, why? As you can see even one of his biggest supporters, Mayor Schumm is having trouble protecting him this time. Money can't buy you love, but it seems it can buy you forgiveness in Lawrence.

4

lawrencereporter 2 years ago

KU as stepped over the line insisting that the donors son-in-law builds the recreation center. How can KU justify using its political power to force the tax payers of Lawrence to do as they say. Does John Stewart really believe that his daughters husband should take profits from the city because he donates to KU. Actually, it's not known today who is buying the land the land from Stultz. I understand its not KU or KU Endowment, it's really a shell company (fake foundation) of the Fritzel's. Beware, if his mouth is open he's lying.

1

JackMcKee 2 years ago

The man uses fake grass. Who else does that? Nobody. Just him. What else do you need to know?

2

paulveer 2 years ago

You know, when he was running for commission this last time around, Schumm totally denied that incident had ever happened. Said he could prove he was out of town at the time. 'what a liar, but then who wants to admit that he was forced to climb down the hole of an outhouse, yell for help until someone came, and then be afraid to tell who did it?

1

MarcoPogo 2 years ago

Paul, the incident DID happen but it wasn't to Schumm. It was a college-aged kid that had accidentally dropped a paycheck down the hole and was trying to fish it out. I was sad when the legend was debunked...it's like having Christmas ruined for you.

1

MarcoPogo 2 years ago

This was according to an article - later turned into a short movie - written by KU professor, David Ohle. (Which version are you going with? That the KC mob dumped him in and/or was there cocaine money involved?)

And the thought of "nobody would ever do _" just doesn't cut it.

0

paulveer 2 years ago

Marco, I don't know what incident you are referring to, but yes, it did happen to Schumm. He claimed he had dropped his wallet and went in after it. He had no explanation as to why he was there alone in the middle of the day (it was at the beach on the other side of the lake by the town of Clinton), or why he would climb down an outhouse after a wallet with no one else around.

It was reported in the J-W, including his name and other particulars about him. It caused some amusement at the time, but many of us remember it and know that it's not merely legend or myth.

I take issue with his flat-out lying about it now, claiming it never happened.

0

somedude20 2 years ago

For someone who seems to care about what YOUR own definition of shyster is (and "being offended"), you sure seem to have no problems spreading (false) rumors about other people's addictions, that is so f-n classy. I am offended by your character assassination of Mayor Schumm but I am not flagging your post, rather, Let Mr. Schumm read this, and maybe you'll post your name, as he should have a right to know who YOU are, Paul..... "Noun 1. shyster - a person (especially a lawyer or politician) who uses unscrupulous or unethical methods" Wow, your post fits the meaning...

1

kerryaltenbernd 2 years ago

"I'm shocked, shocked to find that gambling is going on in here! So says Claude Rains' character in "Casablanca," just before the croupier hands him his roulette winnings.

Apparently our city commissioners don't watch old movies, or what Fritzel is doing would be no surprise. Why should anyone in Lawrence be surprised that a developer might not disclose all the facts about what they really intend to do when applying for a project. If they did, they might not get what they want, especially when they can chalk it up to "unanticipated problems" and get away with it.

Ronald Reagan, who I do not usually quote, one said, "Fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice, shame on me." I wonder what you should say about an organization that has allowed itself to be fooled dozens of times over the years. "Shame" is too mild a word.

5

lawrencereporter 2 years ago

City commissioners said they were surprised too.

“The next thing we know, the house is being dismantled and carted away,” Schumm said.

But Fritzel said city leaders shouldn’t have been surprised. He said he met with members of the city’s Planning Department before work began to dismantle the house. He said he told them a consultant hired to determine how to move the house strongly recommended the house not be moved in one piece.

Looks like Schumm will blame planning staff instead of Fritzel.

2

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 2 years ago

"He said he told them a consultant hired to determine how to move the house strongly recommended the house not be moved in one piece."

And that consultant gave precisely the advice he was hired to give.

2

chasler2001 2 years ago

Is it just me or does the 'new' Varsity House look to be much smaller in dimension?

0

pizzapete 2 years ago

I was up on campus last week taking in the fall colors and walked by the new apartments. I was impressed with how it looked and thought that it fit in well with the other houses and apartments in the area. Although I am a fan of historical preservation, I think it was wishful thinking that the Varsity House could be taken apart, moved, and rebuilt to it's former glory. I agree with many on here who think the house should have been torn down altogether or donated to someone willing to spend the time and money to move it and restore it. The new apartments looks great, but the old house crammed into the corner of the lot looks out of place to me.

0

scaramouchepart2 2 years ago

Actually the problem lies with you all who don't vote. Cronyism is rampant in this country and it is because the developers, in this case, know they can get the people who will give them anything they ask for in office.

1

Limelight 1 year, 12 months ago

Scar I have been thinking the exact same thing as I read the story and the comments. It's up to us to get the right people in the offices so things like this don't continue to happen.

0

scaramouchepart2 2 years ago

Oh by the way, the apartment building will only last about five years. It is planned development. Build to last five years and then sell and new owner can't rent because it is shoddy construction. New apartments replace slightly older apartments and this apartment complex will fall in line to be rebuilt within a few years, with city incentives. And the cycle continues. That's called planned development to developers.

0

blindrabbit 2 years ago

lawrencereporter: Your comments about the drift of the Fritzel family reputation are right on. I remember buying gasoline at Thomas Fritzel's grandfathers Phillips 66 station at 19th and Mass in the 1940's-50's, a more honest guy did not exist. Also grew up in the 23rd and Ohio neighborhood with Gene, a more reputable individual did not exist in the local building industry. Makes one think that the story about the drift of generations has a lot of merit; maybe like the Romney's, too many competing sons in the Gene Fritzel family.

1

lawrencereporter 2 years ago

Here is a link to the city's memo with a link to a letter by Paul Werner. Seriously this must be a joke.

http://lawrenceks.org/assets/agendas/cc/2012/10-23-12/varsity_staff_memo.html

2

lawrencereporter 2 years ago

Commissioner Carter must be busy busing tables at the Oread Inn tonight. Obviously he's to uncomfortable hearing testimony about his friend and possible employer Thomas Fritzel's misdeeds at the Varsity House project so he just didn't show up to the meeting.

1

Lenette Hamm 2 years ago

The minute I heard that Thomas Fritzel was involved in this, I knew what the outcome would be. This particular Fritzel (whose family should make him change his name) has flaunted the fact that he really doesn't give a s**t about what's right or wrong - and tends to lean toward the wrong or sleazy or devious, whatever you wish to call it. He knowingly damaged up property near this site (likely because the owners didn't want to sell it to him just to be demolished) and claimed innocence when confronted . The city needs to seriously fine this guy for this entire mess, for all the other violations he continues to get away with, and be stopped in his tracks if he has another other brilliant plans on the horizon.

2

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 2 years ago

"Now go attack some of those houses that are falling down"

LIke the ones he's building that won't last anywhere nearly as long as the one he lied about preserving?

1

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 2 years ago

Yes, we would. It'd just be in newer but more poorly built structures.

0

Eride 2 years ago

Everyone is ignoring whose fault this all really is.

Lawrence. The city staff has consistently reinforced to large developers that they are much better off ignoring planning and code requirements and asking for forgiveness later. The city smacks down the little guy frequently, but if you are a large developer, punishment is few and far between.

1

Commenting has been disabled for this item.