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Opinion

Opinion

Challenges seek to suppress vote

June 3, 2012

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Bill Internicola had to show his papers.

He received a letter last month from the Broward County, Fla., Supervisor of Elections informing him the office had “information from the state of Florida that you are not a United States citizen; however, you are registered to vote.” So Internicola had to prove he is an American. He sent the county a copy of his Army discharge papers.

Internicola is 91 years old. He was born in Brooklyn. He is a veteran of the Second World War. He earned a Bronze Star for his part in the Battle of the Bulge. Yet he was required to prove to a county functionary that he is entitled to vote in an American election.

We learn from reporter Amy Sherman’s story last week in The Miami Herald that this is part of a campaign by Florida Gov. Rick Scott, a Republican, to weed non-citizens off the rolls of the state’s voters. Initially, Florida claimed 180,000 were possible non-citizens. That number was eventually whittled way down to about 2,600 people. In Miami-Dade County, where the largest number of them live, 385 have been verified as citizens. Ten — 10! — have admitted they are ineligible or asked to be removed from the rolls.

The Herald recently analyzed the list and found it dominated by Democrats, independents and Hispanics. Republicans and non-Hispanic whites were least likely to have their voting rights challenged.

Voter suppression? Intimidation? No way, says Florida Republican Party Chairman Lenny Curry. He blasted Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson for criticizing the effort. Nelson, he said, “asks our public servants to ignore the threat to electoral integrity.”

But the “threat” is very nearly non-existent. Tova Wang, an expert in election law, told U.S. News and World Report in April that the number of people who have been prosecuted successfully for voter fraud is “ridiculously low.” A 2006 report from the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law found documented examples of voter fraud to be “extremely rare” and likened it to one’s chances of being killed by lightning.

The idea that voter fraud is epidemic stems from the occasional high profile exception and from stunts like GOP activist James O’Keefe’s sending some guy into a polling place to vote under the name of Attorney General Eric Holder. But stunts and high profile exceptions do not disprove — nor even address — the statistical reality Wang and the Brennan Center describe.

The demographic trend lines are clearly against the Republican Party. But rather than work to broaden the party’s appeal, some GOP leaders have chosen instead to narrow the other party’s base under the guise of addressing a problem that does not exist. Thus, you get a campaign to gut the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Thus, you get restrictive new Voter ID laws. Thus you get Florida (like New Mexico and Colorado) culling its voter rolls of non-citizens and somehow, apparently by sheer happenstance, targeting those who are most likely to vote for the other party.

Thus, you get Internicola being asked for his papers.

Yes, he provided them. But how many people, in a nation where voter turnout stands at a measly 45.5 percent, are going to make the effort? How many, when repeated obstacles are placed between them and the polling place, are going to give up in frustration? And that, of course, is the whole idea.

This is a thumb on the scales. It is a blatant use of the machinery of government in the cause of voter intimidation and suppression.

Internicola happens to be — what are the odds? — a Democrat. He was “flabbergasted” to learn the state did not consider him a citizen. He called the county office and asked: “Are you crazy?”

But in the end, Bill Internicola had to show them his papers. For that, the governor and his party should be deeply ashamed.

— Leonard Pitts Jr. is a columnist for the Miami Herald. He chats with readers from noon to 1 p.m. CDT each Wednesday on www.MiamiHerald.com.

Comments

FalseHopeNoChange 2 years, 6 months ago

That's 'nothing' Pitts. Wait til you 'see' what the 'people' in government do with your 'Obamacare'. "Whittling down" will become a common practice whether you have "papers" or not.

Now that will be something for you to 'fear monger' with "gloom and doom" ....if you pull through.

Alyosha 2 years, 6 months ago

It's a common technique used by people who can't make a valid argument to change the topic, as False's comment does above.

Unable, despite all the educational opportunities available, to construct an ethical argument (or even competently write in English) about the issues, a commenter like False can do nothing but attempt to change the subject.

Readers are warranted, from his comment, in concluding that False supports disenfranchising legal voters — an immoral and unethical stance for an American.

Corey Williams 2 years, 6 months ago

Yes, we know you're here. Good idea, though. Thanks for the warning.

camper 2 years, 6 months ago

Thanks for warning us that your on the boards Armstrong.

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

Be a long day, all D's will be in full rant. Nevermind the obscure incidents or conspiracy kooks.

BigAl 2 years, 6 months ago

I am sure you are right Armstrong but then again, as far as obscure incidents goes, that is pretty much what voter fraud is. Obscure. But yet, a lot of Republicans have made it a huge issue.

Alyosha 2 years, 6 months ago

Why are you intent, Armstrong, on posting information that is simply not true? A reasonable reader would be warranted in coming to the conclusion that you are attempting to spread disinformation. Is that your intention?

The incidents of valid voters being purged from lists are not obscure, but rather fairly widespread, and it is not conspiracy kooks who believe so. Moreover, all serious and responsible citizens are concerned — and should be concerned — about any citizen being disenfranchised.

In fact, "The Justice Department letter and mistakes that the 67 county elections supervisors have found in the state list make the scrub undoable, said Martin County Elections Supervisor Vicki Davis, president of the Florida State Association of Supervisors of Elections." http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/state/florida-voter-purge-gets-pushback-from-elections-supervisors-2387004.html

You are wrong on the facts, sir, and appear to be in favor of denying American citizens the ability to exercise their right to vote.

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

Thanks for the laugh, whats next on the conspiracy list ?

tomatogrower 2 years, 6 months ago

You should be ashamed of yourself, Armstrong. The governor of Florida and his cronies should get on their knees to apologize to this veteran who kept Hitler from destroying any vestige of democracy and freedom. How dare they treat him like this. And how dare you defend the jerks.

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

Pot meet kettel, stop calling it black

BigAl 2 years, 6 months ago

Kind of sounds like what is happening in Kansas. There is very little, if any, proof of voter fraud here also. Pitts brings up some excellent points and the first reply we see is "oh yeah, but what about Obamacare?"

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

I believe Chicago and NY are tied for most dead voters. SCOTUS will rule the Obamacare debacle unconstutional and we will be out of that discussion anyway.

Alyosha 2 years, 6 months ago

You are changing the subject again, Armstrong — something only they who cannot marshall a valid ethical argument do.

Until such time as you can demonstrate that you have the ability to argue and debate like a serious ethical adult, your comments are wholly without merit.

Alyosha 2 years, 6 months ago

Changing the subject again, Armstrong, plus a quasi ad hominem post.

If you try hard, Armstrong, I'm sure you can work through this whole list of argumentative fallacies and never once engage the article's topic with anything like ethics or skill:

http://www.don-lindsay-archive.org/skeptic/arguments.html

I know you can do it!

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

No hobby yet huh. How about a support group ?

Alyosha 2 years, 6 months ago

Just doing my patriotic duty, pointing out when fellow Americans engage in sloppy thinking and spread disinformation, which in a democratic republic is dangerous to our liberties.

In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened.

Alyosha 2 years, 6 months ago

I'll just keep doing my patriotic duty to the republic, thanks very much, to throw that light over the public mind which is the best security against crafty and dangerous encroachments on the public liberty.

You should pay more attention to upping your argumentative game, and less on trying to get me to stop pointing out your fallacies and innaccuracies. See it as an honorable challenge.

Unless of course your motive is to substitute tyranny for our republic, which the style and substance of your comments, to reasonable patriots, suggests.

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

When is keeping dead people from voting against public interest. ? Even the Dems wont let themselves into their own convention without ID. Spread your BS elsewhere or wake up and join reality - after you get off your high horse

Alyosha 2 years, 6 months ago

You are confusing multiple issues.

It is illegal to purge voting rolls within 90 days prior to an election. Also, it is illegal to purge voting rolls in a partisan manner, targeting mainly those who are your political opponents. That is what appears to be happening in Florida.

And that you see the attempt to make sure one thinks clearly as BS unfortunately tells all anyone needs to know about your civic integrity and argumentative skills.

Corey Williams 2 years, 6 months ago

Are you sure it's not "gubor mente" or "gubernatio"?

Or maybe you shouldn't post what you hear/read from your crazy right wing sources.

http://sguforums.com/index.php?topic=41178.0

Alyosha 2 years, 6 months ago

Oh, False. Try to think harder before you post. You are spreading silly incorrect information. Your fake etymology is laughably wrong. See http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/-ment

In English (understandable in a way that you wouldn't know this):

"Etymology From Late Latin -amentum, from -mentum via Old French -ment. [edit]Suffix -ment Used to form nouns from verbs, the nouns having the sense of "the action or result of what is denoted by the verb". [edit]Usage notes Generally attached to stem without changes, except when the stem ends in -dge, where the -e is sometimes dropped, as in abridgment, acknowledgment, judgment, and lodgment, with the forms without -e being preferred in American English. Of these, judgment is the most significant, and usage varies globally; see Judgment: Spelling for discussion. [edit]Synonyms -tion [edit]Derived terms"

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

Good thing you're posting on this award winning site. Obviously none of us are as "smart" translation liberal as you.

Alyosha 2 years, 6 months ago

Unwarranted assumptions, there, Armstrong. Unless you consider being able to evaluate arguments as liberal.

Which, come to think of it, would make sense, given your posts.

Carry on with your fallacies. I know you can complete the whole list posted above.

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

Gee this is getting old fast. Popcorn anyone ?

Alyosha 2 years, 6 months ago

Still can't marshall an ethical argument. With every post, Armstrong, you prove my point.

tomatogrower 2 years, 6 months ago

Alyosha, quit trying to confuse conservatives with facts.

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

You should stop posting so often, it's just proof you are consistently wrong

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

Like what, how to be a paranoid conspiracy nut living in 27 square miles of pure fantasy

tomatogrower 2 years, 6 months ago

We could just start posting all the misinformation that comes around in stupid emails. I mean everything you read in an email is true, right Armstrong? Everything that conservatives say is true, even when proven wrong. It's still true. Ignore facts, and your life will be much happier. Ignorance is bliss. I once had an old school mate tell me that educated people are all unhappy. He is a staunch conservative.

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

Since it came from you I will give it due dilligence

cato_the_elder 2 years, 6 months ago

In Indiana and Georgia, the turnout of black voters has actually increased since voter I.D. laws were passed.

This issue has previously been no more than a typical left-wing scare tactic, but right now is being peddled hard because Dem bigwigs know that black voter registration and projected black voter turnout nationally is anemic compared to 2008, and they're laying the groundwork now for excuses if Obama loses in November.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 2 years, 6 months ago

Way to tell only a small part of the story, and a distortion, at that.

"A commonly cited study by New York University's Brennan Center claimed that 11% of the United States population is of voter age, but lacks government-issued photo IDs.[24] A paper in the Harvard Law and Policy Review, “ID at the Polls: Assessing the Impact of Recent State Voter ID Laws on Voter Turnout”(PDF), compares changes in voter turnout between 2002 and 2006 as related to three voting requirement categories – photo ID needed, non-photo ID needed and no identification needed. Key study findings include: 1). “Non-photo ID laws [are] associated with a 2.2% point decline in turnout, and photo ID laws are correlated with a 1.6% point decline.” In a related analysis, the author found a 1.1% decline in turnout in states with strengthened photo ID laws between 2002 and 2006. 2). In 2002, prior to the widespread adoption of photo ID poll requirements, more than 40% of eligible voters in states with no voting ID requirements and more than 35% of voters in states with minimal ID requirements turned out at the polls. By 2006, the percentage of voting-age citizens who turned out in states with no ID requirement or a non-photo ID requirement increased to 42% and 38%, respectively. States requiring a photo voter ID saw the lowest percentage of voter turnout, approximately 37%. 3). Counties with older populations saw an increase in turnout of 1.5%. However, counties with higher Hispanic and Asian-American populations saw a small negative effect on voter turnout as ID laws were tightened. Greater household income positively correlated with voter turnout. 4). Possible variables impacting overall voter turnout include Election Day registration (associated with increases), the presence of an incumbent (a small increase) or a controversial ballot initiative (a 4.6% point increase in voter turnout). Much of the increase in voter turnout can be attributed to news coverage and state-sponsored public outreach."

Corey Williams 2 years, 6 months ago

"Consider nearby North Carolina, which does not yet have a voter ID requirement on the books (Governor Bev Perdue recently vetoed a proposed voter ID bill). In 2006, just 28.8% of registered black voters turned out; in 2010, turnout among black voters was 40.4%. Thus, relative to 2006 black turnout, North Carolina’s level of black turnout in 2010 represented a 40.2% increase. Compare those turnout figures with Georgia’s. In 2006, when there was no voter ID requirement, 42.9% of registered black voters turned out; in 2010, after the state’s restrictive ID requirement became law, turnout was 50.4%. So relative to its 2006 black turnout, Georgia’s level of black turnout in 2010 constituted just a 17.5% increase."

http://www.brennancenter.org/blog/archives/proponents_of_voter_id_laws_need_a_statistics_lesson/

Alyosha 2 years, 6 months ago

Try to deal with the topic of this piece — Florida.

Changing the subject is the recourse of people who cannot marshall and effective or ethical argument with the topic at hand.

It seems your partisanship is keeping you from seeing that politically motivated disenfranchisement of eligible voters is dangerous to everyone's liberty.

We'll assume you have nothing to say about Florida, where "Florida elections supervisors said Friday they will discontinue a state-directed effort to remove names from county voter rolls because they believe the state data is flawed and because the U.S. Department of Justice has said the process violates federal voting laws."

http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/state/florida-voter-purge-gets-pushback-from-elections-supervisors-2387004.html

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 2 years, 6 months ago

From the same wikipedia article linked above.

"Germany has a community-based resident registration system and everyone eligible to vote receives a personal polling notification some weeks before the election by mail, indicating the polling station of the voter's precinct. Voters have to present their polling notification or a piece of photo ID (identity card, passport) when voting. The election officials may refrain from demanding identification when the voter is personally known to them, given his or her name is in the polling station's register of voters."

Such a system would likely actually increase voter turnout-- so don't expect Kobach or any other Republican to propose anything like it.

Corey Williams 2 years, 6 months ago

German law also requires that voting takes place on a sunday or a holiday. That would be a big help, too.

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

Don't expect Kobach or the R's to support a voter ID ? Umm Boz, back off the caffine man, your above post is proving the R's to be correct - again. Are you converting ?

Corey Williams 2 years, 6 months ago

"The election officials may refrain from demanding identification when the voter is personally known to them, given his or her name is in the polling station's register of voters."

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 2 years, 6 months ago

And this--

"Voters have to present their polling notification OR a piece of photo ID"

And that polling notification is sent to them free of charge. No fees, no standing in lines to get it.

tomatogrower 2 years, 6 months ago

And are you good with voting on Sunday? I mean, think of all the working people who would be less likely to miss voting.

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

What difference does it make 24 hours in every day

tomatogrower 2 years, 6 months ago

Okay, show your intelligence about voting. You can only vote for 12 hours. And some people work for a living, commute, and have a family to take care of. If they could vote on a day when they aren't working, more might vote. Of course, you never vote, or you would know a voting day isn't 24 hours.

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

I work for a living, have a family, commute. Big deal time management is a wonderful thing. If you can't find the time to vote it must not be a priority. Obviously you just want to argue so do it to someone who may care about what you think

jhawkinsf 2 years, 6 months ago

There are going to be so many variables from one election to the next that these comparisons may have little or no meaning. If you want to increase the black vote, maybe we should run a black man for president each cycle. If Hispanics are underrepresented at the polls, put a Hispanic at the top of the ticket. Or maybe we can just put a controversial abortion measure on each ballot. That ought to bring 'em out.
If memory serves, 16% voted in the last local election here in Lawrence. Did voter I.D. or lack thereof have any effect? All these comments about what happened in Georgia in 2006 vs. how older Asians voted is fun to look at. And their implications might be meaningful. Or their implications might be zero.

Flap Doodle 2 years, 6 months ago

In other news, Democrats to require photo id to enter their own convention. Irony meter bends its needle against the upper limit post. http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=c87_1338722724&comments=1

Alyosha 2 years, 6 months ago

False equivalence.

A private gathering is not the same as an election.

Can one assume that you support partisan disenfranchisement?

Corey Williams 2 years, 6 months ago

"All participants to the Republican National Convention will be required to carry government-issued photo IDs at all times during the convention. Please bring this with you to the mandatory delegate and alternate meeting as well."

http://convention.texasgop.org/national-convention

Cait McKnelly 2 years, 6 months ago

In an interesting twist, the US DOJ is getting involved. Apparently a warning letter was sent to the FL Secretary of State to stop the purge; a warning that was ignored. Guess we'll see what happens. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/02/florida-voter-purge-federal-warning_n_1564131.html

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

Don't ya just hate it when the D's are caught using a double standard. Ok Alyosha go from here

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

Bad link - see Snaps above post / link

Corey Williams 2 years, 6 months ago

Sorry, was that the "redneck surgery", "mousetrap vs lip", or the "grease bucket head"? Maybe it was the "item not found"?

Alyosha 2 years, 6 months ago

It's a false equivalence, Armstrong, in that an election is not the same as a convention. Thats not so hard to see if you try.

Second, the topic of the article is purging voter roles, not showing an ID.

That's just basic reading comprehension as on the SAT and other standardized tests.

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

kool-aide for your words ?

Wait, what? Democrats tell us that photo ID requirements disenfranchise minority voters, who, inexplicably, have limited access to photo IDs. Yet, at their own convention, they insist that all delegates provide a photo ID to even have access to the convention floor

Alyosha 2 years, 6 months ago

You have apparently given up on any attempt to discuss the activities in Florida, having changed the topic to IDs at political conventions.

I decline to follow your rhetorical move, since the topic of this article is Florida's voter purges.

Your move is understandable, though, in that you are clearly unable to marshall an effective ethical argument. Not wanting to lose, you try to change to a different game.

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

Do you need someone to define double standard for you ? Liberalism is full of double standars you should be very familiar with them

hujiko 2 years, 6 months ago

"All participants to the Republican National Convention will be required to carry government-issued photo IDs at all times during the convention. Please bring this with you to the mandatory delegate and alternate meeting as well."

http://convention.texasgop.org/nation...

Taken above from mancityfooty, not that you'll recognize this double standard. Go back to your hole.

Armstrong 2 years, 6 months ago

It's not a double standard if you endorse the idea. Go back to sleep

Flap Doodle 2 years, 6 months ago

Without dead people voting, how would Rahm ever have gotten elected in Chicago?

Cait McKnelly 2 years, 6 months ago

Without hanging chad, how could Bush have ever carried Florida?

jhawkinsf 2 years, 6 months ago

Each and every one of those hanging chads was created by a voter not fully complying with the instructions given. If their ballot then became a matter of dispute and the voter wanted to blame someone for that dispute, then the person to blame is that person in the mirror.

jhawkinsf 2 years, 6 months ago

Let's see if my memory is any good. If three corners of the chad were broken, it was called a hanging chad. If two corners were broken, I forget. If one corner was broken it was called a dimpled chad and if no corners were broken, but there was an impression made when the punching device was pressed to the chad it was called a pregnant chad. Sound right? Now tell me exactly where the spirit and clear intention starts and where it ends and then compare that with the law that was in place at the time. Then add in the fact that partisan poll workers will be holding up the ballots to the light, trying to guess then intentions of the voters. Then add in the butterfly ballots where a known opponent (Buchanan) of Israel got a whole bunch of votes from elderly Jews, (surely they meant to vote for Gore, so in the spirit of of clear intentions, let's just switch those votes for them). Of course, we can go another route, that being expecting voters to know the rules and expecting them to follow the rules.

jafs 2 years, 6 months ago

How about using voting machines that are easier to use, and that produce clear results without a lot of interpretation?

If we actually want to count everybody's vote accurately, that is.

jhawkinsf 2 years, 6 months ago

Please do recall that every single ballot was counted by machines, twice. And both results yielded Bush a victory. The problem was that the machines themselves failed to count a certain number of ballots. And it was those ballots that became a bone of contention. Whether the machines didn't count the ballots because they were folded, spindled or mutilated, or because they had hanging chads, dimpled chads, etc., that was the problem. And it was further complicated by Florida law that forbid hand recounts except in cases were the machines themselves malfunctioned. But no one ever suggested that the machines malfunctioned. Machines are supposed to kick out folded, spindled and mutilated ballots. And they're supposed to kick out ballots that the machine reader fails to interpret. What else could they do? One more problem with these particular machines was that each county buys their own machines. And some machines were more expensive and less likely to kick out as many ballots. Yet some counties bought the less expensive machines. But whether or not you agree with that policy, the fact remains that the machines functioned as designed and therefore, a hand recount should not have been allowed, as per Florida law. And if you think that system is flawed, another system that would be even more flawed would be the one having poll workers holding ballots up to the light and trying to determine the intent of the voter. Now that's crazy, in my opinion.

jafs 2 years, 6 months ago

Again, why not have a system that's easy to use, and that results in all votes being accurately counted?

Your comments merely point out the problems with the system in Florida, as far as I can tell.

At this point in our technological development, it should be quite easy to design a voting system that works well, I think.

jhawkinsf 2 years, 6 months ago

Maybe, maybe not. Machines have certain limitations and those limitations are magnified when humans don't follow instructions. Won't they still kick out the folded, spindled and mutilated ballots. Maybe we can go to a fully computerized system, but that just might suppress the vote of those with limited computer skills. Isn't that the original topic, how to achieve a system where we know an eligible voter is the person actually voting without something that might suppress the vote of certain people or groups of people? And as with the Florida counties that chose to go with cheaper machines, the costs involved might make a easy, safe method very expensive. And I assume you mean for it to be uniform throughout the country, so counties will lose that responsibility and the federal government will be responsible for all those costs. That in itself runs contrary to our fear of a strong central government. I'm not disagreeing with you. But I don't think it would be easy either.

jafs 2 years, 6 months ago

Given our vast technological expertise, it should be easy.

There may be other considerations, like cost.

Kate Rogge 2 years, 6 months ago

Exactly. If we can rely upon https: secure sockets to keep online bank ATM transactions, tax payment transactions, and so forth accurate and secure, why can't we create a national online election voting system that is rock solid? Aren't our elections important enough to be accessible, accurate, and protected from data fraud? Or is the security of electronic data important only when money is transferred?

jhawkinsf 2 years, 6 months ago

We probably can. There would be substantial costs involved. But two problems come to mind. First, if an ATM or tax payment problem arrises, we simply refund the money or in some other manner correct the problem. How do you propose we correct a problem after a president has been sworn in? A new election? Second problem lies in our head. Our country was founded on the notion that we fear a too strong central government. This is precisely the type of proposal that would give the federal government much greater power. We'd have to overcome that.

Flap Doodle 2 years, 6 months ago

My clock has been functioning perfectly for years and years now. No cleaning has been required lately.

Corey Williams 2 years, 6 months ago

Because even if it's broken, it's still right wing twice a day, right?

tomatogrower 2 years, 6 months ago

I would like to see the full list of names that were targeted in this scam of the Florida Republicans. How many Smiths, O'Niels, Brownbacks, Limbaughs, Scotts, etc are on that list? Good American names, not those namby pamby names from other countries, right Guv Scott?

Flap Doodle 2 years, 6 months ago

Here's a question regarding an election coming up later this week. Why has the Campaigner in Chief abandoned Wisconsin? Is Barrett that much of a disaster?

camper 2 years, 6 months ago

Nice to see that so much political capital is being spent on a non-existent problem (voter ID fraud). Documented chances of voter fraud, after all, are likened to the probability of being killed by lightning. If one cannot recognize this fact (as presented by Pitts) and you try to change the subject or present mis-information, I believe you are doing a disservice and need to be called out for it. Thank you Alyosha.

Party over country as I see it.

imastinker 2 years, 6 months ago

Florida has a group of hispanics that vote republican pretty often. Rubio is from Florida, and it's no secret that he might be Mitt's VP pick to help court the hispanic vote.

I personally find it hard to care about this. I spent two hours in the DMV on Friday to get new tags for my car. I had to show proper insurance on everything and ID and all kinds of stuff. Voting is a much more important privelige than driving.

I am also curious how they went from 180k people to 2800. How did they whittle that number down? 180k people is huge - and florida is a swing state that can change the election by itself. I say this is a huge issue - for either side of the aisle.

Katara 2 years, 6 months ago

Voting is a right.

Driving is a privilege.

JayhawkFan1985 2 years, 6 months ago

The republicans are the real threat to election integrity. Five justices appointed by republican presidents decided bush II would be president. Those same five justices decided to gut campaign finance law in Citizens United. Gov Jeb Bush of florida and his republican secretary of state were complicit in the election fraud foisted on the US. Our very own Kris Kobach is the ring leader of national GOP effort to suppress the vote of Hispanics in an effort to elect republicans. Gov Jan Myers of Arizona is a republican too. We even have a republican state rep in KS that wants to shoot mexicans from helicopters like feral pigs. The republican failure to redistrict in KS is because they want to screw the few democratic leaning areas in the state just so they can maintain an iron fist in power, not to do what is in the best interest of the state.

Democrats want to expand voting so everyone who is eligible is able to vote. Republicans only want you to vote if statistically you are likely to vote the way they want you to.

Moderate republicans need to abandon the GOP and become democrats. Mark Parkinson has already done this. Bob Dole and Dwight Eisenhower would too.

JayhawkFan1985 2 years, 6 months ago

The problem is that John Anderson was the last person to run for president as an independent and that was 1980. Joe Lieberman ran as an independent for us senate a couple of years ago, but only because he lost the primary. Independents generally can't get elected because they dont have any ideas at all...

Flap Doodle 2 years, 6 months ago

"...Democrats want to expand voting so everyone who is eligible is able to vote..." Last year, the Democratic mayor of New Haven, CT, wanted to expand voting rights to include non-citizens. http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/news/local/New-Haven-Asks-State-to-Allow-Non-Citizens-to-Vote--135569598.html Ya wanna let that camel get his nose into the tent?

yourworstnightmare 2 years, 6 months ago

Solution: a national ID voting card and electronic voting.

This would standardize voting procedures across the country, which right now are a mess of different systems, and would allow voting in your home district from anywhere in the country.

It would also address the miniscule amount of voter fraud the the GOP are som concerned about.

woodscolt 2 years, 6 months ago

Acorn was a victim of a manufactured scam by Fox. They were exonerated by the court ruling. Acorn proved that they were trying to help register voters. As evidenced by this article and the Kobachs and the slanderous manufactured false claims against acorn , the Republicans are systematically disenfranchising voters whom they think will not vote for them.

woodscolt 2 years, 6 months ago

"I am with what Pitts is 'inferring'. A little voter 'fraud' is OK."

That is what your inferring, not Pitts. What Pitts is accurately saying is that the Republicans real goal is to use a "little voter fraud" to trump up and manufacture lies that are used "on a massive scale" to disenfranchise the will of the American people which of course you endorse.

A little voter fraud or massive disenfranchisement of voters.

woodscolt 2 years, 6 months ago

Makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. what a surprise coming from you.

woodscolt 2 years, 6 months ago

Makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. what a surprise coming from you.

camper 2 years, 6 months ago

Good point. "Miniscule" voter fraud.

Disenfranchisement and ballot box stuffing are the bigger threats. These are things a fraudulent voter (if there are any) could do.

camper 2 years, 6 months ago

Disenfranchisement and ballot box stuffing are the bigger threats. These are things a fraudulent voter (if there are any) could never do.

Cait McKnelly 2 years, 6 months ago

This isn't surprising. Only now are moderate Republicans waking up to the fact that their party is being (rather hostilely) taken over. Expect the same this fall in Kansas.

somedude20 2 years, 6 months ago

"We learn from reporter Amy Sherman’s story last week in The Miami Herald that this is part of a campaign by Florida Gov. Rick Scott, a Republican, to weed non-citizens off the rolls of the state’s voters. Initially, Florida claimed 180,000 were possible non-citizens. That number was eventually whittled way down to about 2,600 people. In Miami-Dade County, where the largest number of them live, 385 have been verified as citizens. Ten — 10! — have admitted they are ineligible or asked to be removed from the rolls."

Well we know that Amy is no relation to Tom Sherman as she IS fair and balanced

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