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Archive for Sunday, July 15, 2012

Board to hear comments on convicts up for parole

July 15, 2012

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L.V. Luarks was convicted of second-degree murder in Douglas County in 1981. Luarks, 53, has been paroled numerous times since 1992 – most recently in 2009 — but was sent back to prison each time following parole violations. Luarks is currently housed at the Norton Correctional Facility.

L.V. Luarks was convicted of second-degree murder in Douglas County in 1981. Luarks, 53, has been paroled numerous times since 1992 – most recently in 2009 — but was sent back to prison each time following parole violations. Luarks is currently housed at the Norton Correctional Facility.

Ronald Edwards was convicted of attempted rape, attempted sodomy, kidnapping, theft and burglary in Douglas County in 1992. Edwards, 42, has yet to be paroled on his current convictions. Edwards is currently housed at the Lansing Correctional Facility.

Ronald Edwards was convicted of attempted rape, attempted sodomy, kidnapping, theft and burglary in Douglas County in 1992. Edwards, 42, has yet to be paroled on his current convictions. Edwards is currently housed at the Lansing Correctional Facility.

William Jackson was convicted of aggravated robbery in Franklin County in 1992. Jackson, 52, is currently housed at the Hutchinson Correctional Facility.

William Jackson was convicted of aggravated robbery in Franklin County in 1992. Jackson, 52, is currently housed at the Hutchinson Correctional Facility.

L.V. Luarks and Ronald Edwards, both convicted in Douglas County, are eligible for parole in September, along with William Jackson, convicted of robbery in Franklin County.

This week the Kansas Prison Review Board will hear public comments on all three cases, as well as for 23 other convicts eligible for release in September. Board members use input from the public and victims in the cases as part of their decision. The public also can call or mail in comments.

Here’s more information about the cases:

• Luarks, 53, was convicted of second-degree murder in Douglas County in 1981. He has been paroled numerous times since 1992 – most recently in 2009 — but was sent back to prison each time following parole violations. Luarks is currently housed at the Norton Correctional Facility.

• Edwards was convicted of attempted rape, attempted sodomy, kidnapping, theft and burglary in Douglas County in 1993. Edwards, 42, has yet to be paroled on his current convictions. Edwards is currently housed at Lansing Correctional Facility.

• Jackson, 52, was convicted of aggravated robbery in Franklin County in 1992, and he is currently housed at the Hutchinson Correctional Facility.

Here’s a list of the three public comment sessions:

• 10 a.m. to noon today, City Hall, 701 N. Seventh St., Kansas City, Kan.

• 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Landon State Office Building, 900 SW Jackson, Topeka.

• 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Finney State Building, 230 E. William St., Wichita.

For full list of inmates eligible for parole and for contact information, visit http://bit.ly/N0ozJ0.

Comments

kernal 2 years, 3 months ago

Numerous parole violations on a second degree murder conviction and Luarks is up for review to parole again?! Ridiculous

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littlebit412 2 years, 3 months ago

Personally I think that comments from the peanut gallery is bull. In any other state you serve your time and get out. Kansas waste more tax payers money keeping people in forever and just keep adding time. Not to say all people are rehabilitated, just saying that they have the most ludicrous laws. The whole parole board needs to go. People who don't even know the situation or the law can get up and say I don't want them out and they add more years. That is REDICULOUS

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Paula Kissinger 2 years, 3 months ago

No...there are public comments sessions in other states also. Individuals allowed to speak before the parole board are screened by victims services so that "Joe Blow" citizen not affiliated with the case/criminal is not allowed to just spout off as well. No years are added to anyone's sentence. Parole can be granted at a time specified by state statute which is a date earlier than the convict's release date and specifications must be met before parole is granted. Try learning what you are talking about before you open your mouth...it could save you future embarrassment.

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hipper_than_hip 2 years, 3 months ago

littlebit412:

You are 100% correct! There's no need to consider someone for parole who has served 20 yrs out of a life sentence.

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Paula Kissinger 2 years, 3 months ago

Parole is usually considered at 7-8 years into a 30-life sentence. No one goes for 20 years without parole consideration unless they are not allowed parole as part of their sentence.

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kshack 2 years, 3 months ago

I think they should throw the key away for one of them for sure. I remember one of the cases from when I was a kid. What he did to the woman and what her children (that I knew at the time) had to go through is unforgivable and as far as I am concerned they should put him under the jail and leave him there.

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littlebit412 2 years, 2 months ago

Pitbullgrandma....I know what I am talking about. I live in a state where there is no parole board and have personally witnessed this parole board and the one prior to it. I know how they operate, but thanks for your input. Not everyone is going to agree with me and it is on case by case basis. There are so many cases in Kansas where new law and old law don't coincide. Today a crime may get 5 years under the new laws, but under old law they would have gotten ?-life. The parole board can add time every time the person is up for parole. For instance a parole violation.. they gave 3 years, than parole came up they added 5 years, then parole came up and they added 2 years. the whole time this prisoner has worked and caused no trouble. It makes no sense.

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