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Archive for Monday, February 20, 2012

Santorum backtracks on Obama remarks

GOP presidential candidate says he was questioning ‘world view,’ not faith

February 20, 2012

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— Rick Santorum on Sunday condemned what he called President Barack Obama’s world view that “elevates the Earth above man,” discouraging increased use of natural resources.

The GOP presidential candidate also slammed Obama’s health care overhaul for requiring insurers to pay for prenatal tests that, Santorum said, will encourage more abortions.

A day after telling an Ohio audience that Obama’s agenda is based on “some phony theology, not a theology based on the Bible,” Santorum said he wasn’t criticizing the president’s Christianity.

“I’ve repeatedly said I don’t question the president’s faith. I’ve repeatedly said that I believe the president’s Christian,” Santorum told CBS’ “Face the Nation.”

“I am talking about his world view and the way he approaches problems in this country. I think they’re different than how most people do in America,” he said in the broadcast interview.

The former Pennsylvania senator said Obama’s environmental policies promote ideas of “radical environmentalists,” who, Santorum argues, oppose greater use of the country’s natural resources because they believe “man is here to serve the Earth.” He said that was the reference he was making Saturday in his Ohio campaign appearance when he denounced a “phony theology.”

When pressed by reporters after he made the initial remark, however, Santorum made no mention of the president’s environmental policies. Instead, he suggested that Obama practices one of the “different stripes of Christianity.”

Santorum walked back those comments on CBS Sunday morning.

But later in the day, he again criticized Obama’s “theology” — with no reference to his environmental policies — while speaking to more than 2,000 supporters gathered at a suburban Atlanta megachurch.

The president is “trampling on a constitutional right,” Santorum said of the Obama administration’s recent decision to allow employees of religious schools and hospitals to have birth control covered by their insurance policies.

“It is imposing his ideology on a group of people expressing their theology, their moral code,” Santorum told those gathered in the First Redeemer Church, a megachurch that hosted former presidential candidate Mike Huckabee four years ago.

Obama’s campaign said Santorum’s initial remarks were another attack on the president’s faith by Republican rivals in a nominating contest that has grown increasingly bitter and negative.

“It’s just time to get rid of this mindset in our politics that, if we disagree, we have to question character and faith,” said Robert Gibbs, Obama’s former press secretary, on ABC’s “This Week.”

Comments

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 2 years, 9 months ago

Ain't gonna work, Rick. Your statement was clearly an attack on Obama's sincerity as a Christian.

And horribly distorting the views of environmentalists in general (not just Obama's) isn't going to cut it, either.

jafs 2 years, 9 months ago

Unfortunately, those who like Santorum will most likely simply ignore these strange comments, and backtracking.

It's noteworthy that he didn't identify what "theology" of Obama's he was criticizing.

jafs 2 years, 9 months ago

Only if you think that religious belief is a very important factor in choosing a president.

Do you know anything at all about BLT? Most people who use it as an attack on Obama don't seem to know much about it.

Chris Golledge 2 years, 9 months ago

Apparently, Santorum feels that, although he may have overstepped to question Obama's Christianity, he is still sure that you need to have a theology based on his interpretation of the Christian Bible in order to be a good American.

Apparently, the ideology of the state not playing favorites amongst the religions is not shared by Santorum.

MyName 2 years, 9 months ago

And by "ideology" you mean "law of the land as supported by the constitution itself as well as hundreds of years of court rulings".

Chris Golledge 2 years, 9 months ago

So, these churches that are complaining about the coverage of contraceptives, are they equal-opportunity employees, or do they maintain the right to only hire people from their sect?

Because, if they are considered equal-opportunity, then they are obliged not to impose religious beliefs on their employees.

tomatogrower 2 years, 9 months ago

Obama is just not the "right" kind of Christian. Here's some of the Bible for Ricky boy. Of course these didn't come from the rewritten Conservative Bible. Ricky goes by the same philosophy of those CEO's who ran companies and banks into the ground, and expect to be rewarded for a lousy job. He expects God will reward him for ruining the his creation. Not! Jeremiah 2:7 I brought you into a fertile land to eat its fruit and rich produce. But you came and defiled my land and made my inheritance detestable.

Isaiah 24:4‑6

The earth dries up and withers, the world languishes and withers, the exalted of the earth languish. The earth is defiled by its people; they have disobeyed the laws, violated the statutes and broken the everlasting covenant. Therefore a curse consumes the earth; its people must bear their guilt. Therefore earth's inhabitants are burned up, and very few are left.

jafs 2 years, 9 months ago

It is an interesting question.

Certainly the original intention of the ICC was not to allow such broad power to the federal government - however, over the years the courts, including the SC, have allowed broader interpretations of it to be used.

I'd say it will be declared unconstitutional by a 5-4 decision, with this court. But, of course, in other areas in which a broad interpretation is used, they won't be consistent and disallow it there as well.

Because the other area it's being used broadly is a "law and order" example.

Richard Payton 2 years, 9 months ago

City of Cumming, GA. Gateway to Leisure Living!

beerbaron03 2 years, 9 months ago

"A day after telling an Ohio audience that Obama’s agenda is based on “some phony theology, not a theology based on the Bible,”"

Oh, the irony.

asixbury 2 years, 9 months ago

Am I the only one here that thinks Santorum sounds like a fanatical? Religion and politics should not mix. I recently read an article on BBC online that held the opinion that religion is not such a big sway in Britain's elections. It also stated the belief that in order for American Republicans to get the vote, they most go to the extreme religiously. If they seem like they're not completely over-the-top religious, they do not get their party's backing. I think it is ridiculous how republicans play the religion card to get votes. Sadly, their tactic seems to work sometimes. I could care less what the politician's religious views are (separation of church and state, after all), but what their policies and economic views are. These are the issues that matter. Who gives a damn what imaginary being they believe in.

asixbury 2 years, 9 months ago

lol. Harry Potter would be a better choice than Santorum!

verity 2 years, 9 months ago

If I recall correctly from history, when the "Church" had power over secular government in Europe (basically from the time of Constantine in 312) things didn't work out so well. You'd think we would learn our lesson, but a lust for power always seems to trump everything else

asixbury 2 years, 9 months ago

So sadly true. As the saying goes, "History is doomed to repeat itself."

mom_of_three 2 years, 9 months ago

Santorum is a wing nut, who rewrites history as he sees fit. He has a hard time with the separation of church and state

verity 2 years, 9 months ago

I once asked an attorney friend what was meant by strict constructionism of the Constitution. I wasn't getting an answer that was coherent to me and I finally asked if it was like a literal interpretation of the Bible---he said yes. In other words, it's subject to what everybody thinks it says and is often/usually interpreted in such a way as to support a person's own prejudices or pre-conceived notions.

First of all, our Constitution was not perceived as being perfect by the people who wrote it. There were many compromises, and in the end, probably nobody was completely happy with it. It's obviously subject to change---it has been amended a number of times.

We do live in a different world now than existed 230 years ago. The founders of our government could not, in their wildest imagination, have had any idea of what the world would be like today. If you recall, more than half of the population couldn't vote back then, so had virtually no say in how they were governed.

The fact that our government and constitution still exists after all this time is quite amazing. I hope we don't screw if up now.

verity 2 years, 9 months ago

Last line should be---I hope we don't screw it up now.

yourworstnightmare 2 years, 9 months ago

Man, I hope Santorum wins the GOP nomination.

The only thing better would be if Romney wins. Or Gingrich. Or Paul.

Popcorn, anyone?

beatrice 2 years, 9 months ago

I disagree. You never know what can happen between now and November, and the thought of a Santorum presidency scares the heck out of me.

jafs 2 years, 9 months ago

And most likely a number of moderates on both sides and independents as well.

tomatogrower 2 years, 9 months ago

"far left, extremist, secular progressives" That would be anyone who doesn't toe the party line, right, BAA?

mom_of_three 2 years, 9 months ago

The fact that Santorum talks about so called liberties being taken away by Obama and then says he doesn't believe in gay rights, wants to overturn roe v wade and dont ask, dont tell, and pretty much anything his religion tells him to. He complains about Obama the very thing he himself wants to do. Why doesn't Santorum talk about jobs and the economy? Because he probably doesn't know anything about them? but I am not worried. His version of history and what the founders wanted will soon kick him in the backside.

yourworstnightmare 2 years, 9 months ago

Santorum's ideas are medieval in nature and are in fact very similar in message, if not extent, to those of the Taliban and Iranian mullahs.

Santorum wants to see the USA become a christian nation, a theocracy, with its laws dictated by, not just inspired by, christian theology and belief.

Pass the popcorn.

verity 2 years, 9 months ago

Question: If the US were to become a Christian theocracy, do you think that we would become fanatical to the extent that the Taliban and other radical religious governments have?

It seems to me that this is about power, not about morality or ethics or even religion. And people like Santorum get this power by appealing to people who see themselves as victims---in this case victims of the "liberal secular progressive left."

verity 2 years, 9 months ago

What is this "Party of Atheists"? I would like to join.

tomatogrower 2 years, 9 months ago

So why don't you address the quotes above? They are from the Bible. Or do you only worship the newly rewritten conservative bible, that toes the party line, and doesn't have any of the namby, pamby liberal stuff in it.

MyName 2 years, 9 months ago

ell oh ell. So now you're not just an expert on Theology, you're an expert on politics and can also read the thoughts of every person who posts a negative comment about Santorum.

Tell us all again why you're wasting your "god given" talent posting on the message boards when you could be out consulting for the CIA, or a Fortune 500 company, or fighting crime along side other members of the Justice League of America?

DillonBarnes 2 years, 9 months ago

Instead of worrying about the issues, you'd rather argue semantics and insult liberals.

Here, "Obama backtracks on birth control issue."

Happy? Of course not.

Kirk Larson 2 years, 9 months ago

Santorum had to backtrack because what he said was just dogwhistling "Obama is a Muslim". What next, birtherism?

beatrice 2 years, 9 months ago

All those claims recently about Christianity being under attack, and they turn out to be true! Christianity actually is under attack -- by the Right! Too funny.

Can you imagine how people's heads would explode around here if Obama had said something about Santorum's faith in a similar manner?

Remember, Santorum really does represent the views of many Republicans. I wouldn't be surprised if he thinks the world is 6000 years old, either. That is scary.

beatrice 2 years, 9 months ago

So what is Santorum saying about Romney's theology?

mom_of_three 2 years, 9 months ago

“It is imposing his ideology on a group of people expressing their theology, their moral code,” Santorum told those gathered in the First Redeemer Church, a megachurch that hosted former presidential candidate Mike Huckabee four years ago."

Wait, isn't that what Santorum wants to do too? No abortions, no birth control, no gay marriage?

HELLO POT, MEET KETTLE

yourworstnightmare 2 years, 9 months ago

What Santorum is advocating is theocracy. He wants the laws of the USA to be governed by christian ideology and belief. Quite literally. Not just inspired by.

His anachro-catholic rationalizing and navel gazing would make St. Augustine proud.

America is not, nor ever has been, a christian nation. Santorum should be ashamed as an American to advocate for catholic theocracy as he is now.

America is a representative democracy, a republic, built of laws created by men in a pluralistic, deliberative fashion.

Want theocracy? Move to Iran.

jayhawklawrence 2 years, 9 months ago

You could probably make the argument that Santorum is mentally ill.

At the very least, he is not a very smart guy for someone who is running for President.

How long are we going to wait for the Republican Party to run a candidate who is actually qualified for the job instead of candidates who make a mockery of the process?

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