Opinion

Opinion

U.N. actions threaten Israel

September 21, 2011

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The world — or at least the large part of it that hates Israel and wishes it would go away — moves a step nearer that goal this week when the United Nations votes on whether to recognize a Palestinian state. The vote violates the Declaration of Principles signed by the PLO in 1993, which committed the terrorist group and precursor to the Palestinian Authority to direct negotiations with Israel over a future state. This violation is further evidence the Palestinian side cannot be trusted to live up to signed agreements and promises. Jerusalem Post columnist Caroline Glick rightly calls the prospective UN vote “diplomatic aggression.”

Israel — like the Jewish people for centuries — has become the fall guy for people who prefer their anti-Semitism cloaked in diplomatic niceties. The Palestinians could have peace any time they wish and probably a state, too, if they acknowledged Israel’s right to exist and practiced verbal, religious and military disarmament. One has a right to question the veracity of a people who claim they want peace, while remaining active in ideological, theological and military warfare aimed at its publicly stated objective: the eradication of the Jewish state.

The United States has pledged to veto the Palestinian Authority’s membership application if it comes before the U.N. Security Council, but the General Assembly is another matter. There, only a majority vote would be needed to grant the Palestinian government permanent observer status. From that point forward it would be death by a thousand diplomatic cuts until Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad finally decides to fulfill his own prophecy and drop a nuclear bomb on Jerusalem or Tel Aviv. Following that horror, European and American diplomats will wring their hands and say it would not have happened had Israel been more “flexible” and ceded additional territory.

Before Israel is allowed to disappear again (as Palestinian maps and school textbooks already depict) and the Jews who survive are sent into exile (who would take them?), it is worth noting a few of the numerous contributions Israel has made to the world, compared to what the Arab-Muslim-Palestinian culture has contributed.

This tiny land with less than 1/1,000th of the world’s population, has produced innovative scientists that have contributed to cellphone, computer and medical technology, including the development of “a disposable colonoscopic camera that makes most of the discomfort surrounding colonoscopies obsolete,” discovery of “the molecular trigger that causes psoriasis,” as well as “the first large-scale solar power plant — now working in California’s Mojave Desert.” Read about many more Israeli contributions to the world at http://www.israel21c.org/didyouknow/didyouknow.

These innovations, and many others, took place while Israel was engaged in wars, suffering terrorist attacks from enemies who seek its destruction and spending more per capita on its defense than any other country.

If Israel were to be made even more vulnerable and possibly eradicated by unilateral recognition of a Palestinian state, the moral stain on the West would be a “mark of Cain” for generations to come. What other nation, what other people, would the so-called “civilized” world allow to be targeted for annihilation like Israel has been?

Israel’s Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, will come to the UN to deliver a speech on the same day Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas is scheduled to give his speech calling for the body to support Palestinian statehood. “The General Assembly is not a place where Israel usually receives a fair hearing,” Netanyahu said last week, “but I still decided to tell the truth before anyone who would like to hear it.”

The UN can’t handle the truth and few member states will like hearing it. The blood of the Jewish people will be on their hands if they continue to empower individuals and nations whose goal is to create Holocaust II and a “Palestine” without Jews.

— Cal Thomas is a columnist for Tribune Media Services. His email is tmseditors@tribune.com.

Comments

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 10 months ago

I'm sure Cal would love to drop some nukes on the Palestinians if he could.

gr 3 years, 10 months ago

Da 11:41 He shall enter also into the glorious land, and many countries shall be overthrown: but these shall escape out of his hand, even Edom, and Moab, and the chief of the children of Ammon. 42 He shall stretch forth his hand also upon the countries: and the land of Egypt shall not escape. 43 But he shall have power over the treasures of gold and of silver, and over all the precious things of Egypt: and the Libyans and the Ethiopians shall be at his steps. 44 But tidings out of the east and out of the north shall trouble him: therefore he shall go forth with great fury to destroy, and utterly to make away many. 45 And he shall plant the tabernacles of his palace between the seas in the glorious holy mountain; yet he shall come to his end, and none shall help him.

Is it Israel? Is it Palestine? Or someone else? Keep your eyes open to the future and watch who it will be...

Ron Holzwarth 3 years, 10 months ago

There are a few things that are very telling about many of the Palestinians that live in the Gaza Strip. They hate Israel and want it to be destroyed. The stated goals of Hamas makes that very clear, and they certainly do not consider themselves to be bound by the Geneva Convention. Among many other things, you can do a quick web search on the plight of Gilad Shalit to verify that.

This is only one of the many inconsistencies of the Palestinian saga:

They want Israel to be destroyed. Until someone develops cancer. Then, they run to Israel, where they can receive treatment which is very often successful.

(That's not surprising, because Jewish people have made significant contributions at the cutting edge of medial science for many centuries. Unfortunately, even though Arabs outnumber Jewish people by orders of magnitude, there isn't a lot of,,, I better stop here because I wouldn't want to be politically incorrect. But it is true that Arab nations contribute a lot of crude oil to the world.)

Then, after treatment for cancer, the Palestinians go back to the Gaza Strip, and the saga continues.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 10 months ago

It's not exactly like they can go to their own hospitals-- Israel has bombed all of those.

Ron Holzwarth 3 years, 10 months ago

Yes, that is exactly why there has been no major medical advance made in any of the Arabic cultures for over a thousand years.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 10 months ago

Yes, Ron, we know that Arabs/Muslims are inferior beings who need to be kept in gulags lest they bother all the superior races.

Ron Holzwarth 3 years, 10 months ago

The problem is not that they are genetically inferior, it's that a secular education is not valued in Arabic cultures as it is in Jewish ones. As a direct result of that, here in the US there are very few if any public Muslim hospitals, but Jewish ones abound.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 10 months ago

The irony of your assertion is that the Palestinians (and Lebanese) were historically among the most moderate of all Arabs, with a history of appreciation for education.

And WTF does the ownership of hospitals in the US have to do with the situation in Palestine/Israel?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 10 months ago

Hamas are Palestinians. But its more violent factions are definitely a problem, just as the violent factions in control of Israel are a problem.

jhawkinsf 3 years, 10 months ago

Hamas is not just a problem, they're a problem without a solution. As is Hezbollah. There is no regional organization, not the Palestinian Authority and not any other country that has the willpower to confront and disarm Hamas, Hezbollah and even more radical factions. And Israel is vilified when they try to keep them in check. That's been the major stumbling block for decades now. Even as the P.L.O. evolved from a terrorist organization, they were replaced by other radical groups. When Arabs are willing and able to police the radicals in their own community, then the process can move forward.
There are radical groups in Israel that would like to do some very radical and disturbing things. Like expel all Arabs living within current Israel. It's Israel's obligation to keep them in check. It's Israel's obligation to prevent them from doing that. It's the obligation of the Palestinian Authority, Palestinians in general and Arabs more broadly to control the radical elements within their camp. Not only have they failed, they've never even tried. And in some cases, they've done just the opposite.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 10 months ago

Nobody is attempting disarm Israel, either, they get $3 billion a year in US taxpayer funds, and commit orders of magnitude more violence than Hamas does.

jhawkinsf 3 years, 10 months ago

A disarmed Israel would be a historical Israel. They would be overwhelmed by the many countries with far superior numbers and much greater resources. A call to disarm has the same practical effect as a call to eliminate. Do you disagree? And U.S. support goes back to my post of 11:41, the worst case scenario. U.S. support buys influence. And not just in Israel, but in many other countries in the region, including within the Palestinian Authority.

jhawkinsf 3 years, 10 months ago

Worst case scenario: A major war in the region. The combined forces of the many Arab countries finally get their act together and finally fight an effective war. They coordinate their forces and use their overwhelming advantage in resources and manpower and they overwhelm Israel, a very small country surrounded by potentially hostile neighbors. Israel, faced with it's possible destruction, and then faced with it's almost certain destruction, responds. They respond in the only way in which they have an overwhelming advantage. They use their heavy weapons, yes, they drop nuclear weapons. And where would be the most effective places to drop these weapons? On the capitals of those Arab countries. Something akin to Mutual Assured Destruction. With no shortage of messianic attitudes in that region, it's more likely than the same policy we followed during the height of the cold war. The results of this worse case scenario would be a disaster not just for the people killed. The region would be in turmoil for centuries. If you think Greece potentially defaulting would cause a global collapse of world economies, wait until this happens. Millions in Africa would starve as aid would dry up. Disease, the next AIDS would kill millions more. Fallout would cause world wide cancers to soar. We would not be immune. Our economy would be rocked. The poor here would see poverty not seen here, ever. The Great Depression would be the good old days. How do we prevent this worst case scenario? First, it must be understood that we need influence in the region. As the world's last military super-power, it's more important that we have that influence than anyone else. If others can positively influence, great. But it's imperative that we have as much influence as possible. The worst thing we can do, though in the short term might make us feel good, would be for us to disengage from the region. Because of our support for Israel over the years, we have more influence over them than anyone else. That needs to continue. We need to establish and maintain friendly relations with moderate Arab leaders while trying to isolate the radicals.
Basically, in order to minimize the possibility of that worst case scenario, it's in our best interest to continue on the path we are currently on.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 10 months ago

So If Israel is forced to start negotiating in good faith with the Palestinians, they'll nuke Arab capitals?

"Because of our support for Israel over the years, we have more influence over them than anyone else."

The US could have influence over Israel, but our presidents and legislators are too cowed by the pro-Israeli lobby to use it, and the Obama administration has been no different.

jhawkinsf 3 years, 10 months ago

Again Bozo, you're inability to correctly read and interpret my comments is amazing. Have you ever considered taking a remedial reading class? I clearly said if there was a major war and if the Arab armies were able to coordinate more effectively and if they came close to destroying Israel, then Israel might be forced to use it's nuclear weapons. I certainly did not say that they would nuke Arab capitals if forced into negotiations.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 10 months ago

The subject of Cal's little rant is the potential UN declaration of a Palestinian state. My reading comprehension is good enough to figure that out, but you, not so much.

Anyway, why shouldn't the Palestinians get the same declaration of statehood from the UN that Israel got 63 years ago?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 10 months ago

If a Palestinian state is approved by the UN, that UN membership would require it to recognize the statehood of all other members of the UN, including Israel. And, of course, Israel would have to reciprocate. Is that what Israel is really afraid of? The removal of its main rationale for its oppression of the Palestinian people.

jhawkinsf 3 years, 10 months ago

The reality Israel is afraid of is that Hamas and Hezbollah would not respect Israel's right to exist. And they are afraid that the Palestinian Authority would be unwilling or unable to control them. And they are afraid that other regional countries such as Iran would continue to funnel arms to Hamas and Hezbollah and that the Palestinian Authority would be unwilling or unable to prevent that.
You speak of forced recognition. That's just the problem Israel has suffered since it's in very beginning. Look to that region and count the number of countries that still do not recognize Israel's right to exist. And then look to the Arab Street. Look at the recent developments in Egypt and you will see how tenuous recognition is even amongst those that do purport recognition. While you decry the lack of "real" negotiations, and you do have a point. But the other side of the coin is "real" recognition. Something Israel has never really enjoyed from it's regional neighbors.

Ron Holzwarth 3 years, 10 months ago

jhawkinsf, when discussing Israel with a lot of people, logic, reason, and history simply do not apply. Haven't you figured that out yet?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 10 months ago

A very ironic statement, especially given that you and jhawkins are the most uncritical supporters of Israel, and bashers of all things Arab/Muslim.

BTW, my position on these forums has been very consistent-- both sides need to compromise, make considerable concessions to each other, and give up violence as a means of getting what they want. But because of your uncritical support of Israel, all you can hear when I say that is criticism of Israel.

Which requires that you abandon all logic and reason, and apply history very selectively.

jhawkinsf 3 years, 10 months ago

The irony, Bozo, is that while you state my support of Israel is "uncritical", it is simply not true. Just look to my post of 12:18 where I specifically agree with you that "real" negotiations have been lacking. But you spend so much time twisting and turning what I say that it's almost impossible to carry on a civil conversation. Over and over you misinterpret. Someone in this forum has used the term "willful ignorance". Sound familiar?
And when legitimate counter arguments are made to your posts, you choose to simply ignore them. What do you think of Hamas and Hezbollah? Why does the Palestinian Authority allow those terrorist organizations to continue their reign? What do you think of regional lack of recognition? What do you think of the "Arab Street"? Why do you believe Israel has obligations of recognition that others have ignored? Why the double standard? And lastly, but most importantly, given the fact that during major wars, Israel never made any attempt to eliminate any other country, and the fact that many Arab countries did make those statements and continue to make those statements, do you really believe that the desire to eliminate Israel has passed, that regional powers and the "Arab Street" now accepts Israel's right to exist and would make no further attempts at eliminating Israel, if given the opportunity?

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 10 months ago

There are factions in Palestine and Lebanon who'd like to see Israel disappear, but within those two countries and in the Arab world as a whole, the vast majority accept Israel's existence, even if they don't like it all that much. Israeli paranoia in this regard has little basis in current reality, but it does serve as the rationale for factions in Israel who would like to remove all Arabs from both Israel and all other Palestinian territories, and they just happen to exert a good deal of control over Israeli policies. As a result, Palestinian suffering in any way you want to measure it is way worse than anything the Israelis have to endure.

If those viewpoints continue to govern Israelis' actions, for the short term, the rather ugly status quo will be maintained. But in the long term, Israel's isolation will continue to grow, and even the US will eventually move away from them.

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