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Archive for Sunday, September 11, 2011

House catches fire on 1300 block of Tennessee; no occupants injured

A house on the 1300 block of Tennessee caught fire early Sunday morning, displacing, but not injuring, all 10 of the residents.

September 11, 2011, 8:22 a.m. Updated September 11, 2011, 1:57 p.m.

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Lawrence Douglas County fire fighters contained a house fire on 1325 Tennessee early Sunday morning. None of the houses 10 occupants were injured.

Lawrence Douglas County fire fighters contained a house fire on 1325 Tennessee early Sunday morning. None of the houses 10 occupants were injured.

A house on the 1300 block of Tennessee caught fire early Sunday morning, displacing, but not injuring, all 10 of the residents.

Andrew Adford, who stayed at the house Saturday night, was awake about 6 a.m. when he noticed a couch on the front porch was on fire.

"I woke up everyone up on the bottom floor, checked it again and the entire deck was on fire," said Adford, a sophomore at Kansas University.

Adford rushed upstairs to alert the second- and third-floor residents, who exited the house through a fire escape in the back. By this time, Adford said the fire started to spread.

Adford's hands were blackened from the smoke, and the Los Angeles native received oxygen treatment when emergency responders arrived.

By the time firefighters arrived about 6:30 a.m., the front of the house was fully engulfed with flames emitting from the roof, said Chief Mark Bradford of Lawrence Douglas County Fire and Medical.

An hour later, the fire was contained, and residents stood outside drinking bottled water as they watched smoke pour from the attic of the charred house. Bradford said all of the residents would need to be relocated.

The residents didn't have any relocation plans, but said KU would offer them assistance. The fire not only took their home, but most of their belongings as well.

"If the fire didn't get them, the water did for sure," Adford said.

Jane Blocher, Douglas County Red Cross, said KU's Office for Student Success will replace some of those belongings, including books, laptops and school supplies. She said KU began the program in 2005 after the Boardwalk Apartment fires, when many KU students were affected by the disaster.

In the meantime, the Red Cross provided the residents food and clothing. Blocher said all residents have found temporary housing.

Comments

copyright 3 years, 3 months ago

Just a note:

Should be ten "residents" displaced (vs. "residences") in first paragraph.

chong 3 years, 3 months ago

Good catch. Thanks.

Chris Hong LJ World Reporter

Hadley_says 3 years, 3 months ago

Not the first time this landlord with multiple Oread properties has had a house burn. The city should be embarrassed for what they allow to occur in this area.

copyright 3 years, 3 months ago

Wow. Horrible. Thanks for the research!

John Hamm 3 years, 3 months ago

For one thing "couches" are prohibited from front porches by City ordinances. That shouldn't be the landlord's fault - though they should have indicated so to the residents. Students do tend to ignore basic common sense items on occasion. Luckily no one was injured - this time.

ralphralph 3 years, 3 months ago

That's where I was headed .... maybe the only fault of the landlord would be for not making the tenants be classy enough to not have a couch on the front porch, or smart enough not to set it on fire then go to bed.

Jake Hess 3 years, 3 months ago

I live nearby and that sounded more like a four alarm fire than a two alarm. Nevertheless, glad to hear no one was injured. Probably someone smoking on the front porch and left it burning near the couch. Genius, dude. Amazing how quickly one little cigarette can displace ten people and their belongings. Or is the couch on the porch to blame?

ralphralph 3 years, 3 months ago

If you're going to have a couch on the front porch, you should cover it with recycled toddler pajamas ... flame retardant.

fudude 3 years, 3 months ago

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Sunny Parker 3 years, 3 months ago

The property owner should sue that idiot kid!

waka3 3 years, 3 months ago

dude thats whi bongs are so much better

Bob Forer 3 years, 3 months ago

An available and inexpensive fire extinguisher would have kept the damage to a minimum--a destroyed crummy old porch couch and perhaps a little charring. Have the city fathers .ever considered an ordinance requiring a fire extingusiher in all rental properties? I know smoke alarms are required. Why not fire extinguishers? The small, disposable ones can be bought in bulk for less than ten dollars each, and could save a life.

I keep two fire extingusihers in my house and one in my car. Picked them up at a garage sale, brand new, for two bucks apiece.

If you are going to keep one in the kitchen, don't store it in the cabinet next to the stove. The stove area is the most likely place for a fire to start, and if it spreads quickly, the cabinet it contains may be too hot to retrieve the extinguisher. A friend of mine had a small stove/oven fire and couldn't retrieve her fire extinguisher because of this. Instead of minimal damage her insurance company ended up spending nearly fifty grand for a new kitchen, new carpeting throughout the downstairs (the firemen spread soot into an adjoining room while fighting the blaze) and alleviating smoke damage throughout the house.

jhawk0097 3 years, 3 months ago

"An available and inexpensive fire extinguisher would have kept the damage to a minimum--a destroyed crummy old porch couch and perhaps a little charring."

Another poster speaking from the wrong orifice. You must have stayed at a Holiday Inn last night.

Bob Forer 3 years, 3 months ago

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theoljhawk 3 years, 3 months ago

You mean the firefighters didn't wipe their feet prior to entering the residence? Why, I never heard of such a thing! Shame on them! If they did, the fire may have spread elsewhere while they were cleaning their feet. Better to lose $50k vs $100k!

Kendall Simmons 3 years, 3 months ago

Apparently you didn't read the article carefully. The fire was on the porch. Outside. An overnight GUEST discovered it. He opted to wake all the residents and get them to safety rather than trying to find a fire extinguisher.

The city code already requires rental properties to have fire extinguishers as well as smoke detectors. Fortunately, it does not require that one try to put out a fire before getting people to safety.

This young man's actions were far more likely to have saved a life than your option.

Bob Forer 3 years, 3 months ago

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Jean Robart 3 years, 3 months ago

hey sychophant--did YOU wake up on the wrong side of the bed this morning?

tanaumaga 3 years, 3 months ago

I thought you didn't have to have fire extinguishers unless it was a building with more than 3 dwellings inside. Also, city codes prohibit upholstered furniture on porches..... ....on a different note, my guess is that the visitor passed out with the cigarette....but it doesn't matter either way. They got everybody out safely.....hope they had renters insurance.

chong 3 years, 3 months ago

Just to clarify, the guest was inside talking with another person when they noticed the fire. He was not asleep on the couch outside.

And, you're right, the most important thing is that everyone was safe.

Thanks, Chris Hong Reporter LJ World

pennsyl 3 years, 3 months ago

I have long believed it to be against city code to have couches and other non-outdoor furniture on on one's porch, but after rereading the ciy code it is not so clear... not sure if it only prohibits having these in the yard or outdoors completely - including porches.

DEFINITION.... (J) Furniture, Outdoor shall mean weather-resistant furniture designed and manufactured for outdoor use. (Ord. 7802)

9-606 UNLAWFUL ACTS....... 9-606.1 Exterior Conditions (Yard/Porches) shall include, but not be limited to, the scattering over or the parking, leaving, depositing or accumulation on the yard and/or porches of any of the following: (Ord. 7026, Ord. 7802) (A) Lumber, wire, metal, tires, concrete, masonry products, plastic products, supplies, equipment, machinery, auto parts, junk or refuse; (B) Abandoned motor vehicles; or (C) Furniture in the yard, other than outdoor furniture as defined in Section 9-603.2(J), stoves, refrigerators, televisions, sinks, or other such items of personal property.

irvan moore 3 years, 3 months ago

wow, it sounds to me like the couch helped save the lives of the students. if that kid hadn't been sleeping on it he wouldn't have been there to wake everybody else up and get them out. the kid deserves a lot of credit for what he did.

redweathered 3 years, 3 months ago

Ashley Funderburk

I have lived in that house

kansasfire911 3 years, 3 months ago

I had an oppurtunity to meet some of thef LDCFM t day at the 110 floor climb for the fallen 343 FDNY. I have to say job well done!!! Thats what its all about, instead of saying I'm to tired to do this, you stil had another task to do. Good job men and I'm proud to call you brothers!!!

jayhawkblondie 3 years, 3 months ago

I was at the house the night of the fire I left 2 hours before it happened. I am friends with the people who live there. Nobody there knows what started the fire though obviously it was a cigarette or criminal intent. Its possible someone who did not live there left the cigarette on the couch.. so please do not call the people who lived there idiots. They're responsible people, you can't over see every little thing everyone who comes into that house or who is on the porch does, there was multiple people in and out of the house that night. It was an unfortunate accident and I just wish I would have stayed later as to prevent it from getting out of hand such as it did.

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