After Open Records request, SRS provides more detailed explanation for some office closings

The Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services released information Monday about the closure of the Lawrence office — after the Lawrence Journal-World sought the information Wednesday morning through an Open Records request.

The data include more details about how SRS expects to save $413,000 by closing the local office, its reasoning behind the closings, and how these offices compare with others statewide.

SAVINGS

Here’s how SRS expects to save $413,000 a year:

  • $18,563 — phone.
  • $331,875 — property rental.
  • $18,217 — copier rental.
  • $2,969 — postage machine rental.
  • $16,406 — janitorial contract.
  • $210 — pest control.
  • $761 — shredding.
  • $26,581 — electricity.
  • $3,234 — natural gas.
  • $1,121 — water.
  • $3,751 — sewage.
  • $2,290 — solid waste.
  • $1,935 — building supplies/repair.

SRS expects to spend $14,528 more on travel expenses because of the closure.

OFFICES BEING CLOSED

Here are the number of cases served in June, and the population of those served by each office, followed by reasons SRS gave for closures. It provided reasons for just a handful of the closures.

Lawrence — 10,211 cases, 110,826 population.

Reasons: Significant savings; nearby access to offices in Topeka, Ottawa, Kansas City, Overland Park and Leavenworth; more than 100 spaces are open in Topeka and Kansas City offices; 19 percent of Douglas County children living in poverty compared with 31 percent in Wyandotte County and 27 percent in Shawnee County; and Topeka’s is a state-owned building with significant empty space.

Coffeyville — 8,084, 35,471.

Reasons: None provided.

Fort Scott — 5,462, 24,829.

Reasons: None provided.

McPherson — 2,269, 29,180.

Reasons: Nearby offices in Newton and Hutchinson; it has a smaller staff and caseload compared with Newton and Hutchinson; 9 percent of population are living in poverty compared with 13.8 percent in Reno County and 10.5 in Harvey County; and it ranks second in state for smallest percentage — 10.4 — of children living in poverty.

Wellington — 2,129, 30,166.

Reasons: Winfield is nearby and has space to accommodate Wellington staff but not vice versa; lease is month-to-month; average monthly Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) participants are double in Winfield compared with Wellington.

Marysville — 1,429, 20,295.

Reasons: Regional office director indicates “walk in traffic is light” and “customers already have a lot of contact by phone” and there are just 12 employees.

Pratt — 949, 18,954.

Reasons: None provided.

Garnett — 748, 8,102.

Reasons: Proximity to Ottawa, Osawatomie and Iola.

Lyndon — 422, 16,295.

Reasons: None provided.

OFFICES REMAINING OPEN

Here are the number of cases served in June, and the population of those served by each office:

  • Wichita — 77,110 cases; 498,365 population.
  • Kansas City — 34,582; 157,505.
  • Topeka — 33,475; 191,396
  • Overland Park — 32,354; 544,179.
  • Hutchinson — 13,308; 82,452.
  • Salina — 11,120; 112,793.
  • Manhattan — 10,201; 86,703.
  • Pittsburg — 8,545; 39,134.
  • Leavenworth — 8,498; 76,227.
  • Garden City — 8,267; 53,610.
  • Emporia — 7,775; 51,004.
  • El Dorado — 7,607; 72,569.
  • Junction City — 6,157; 34,362.
  • Newton — 5,981; 47,344.
  • Atchison — 5,838; 43,995.
  • Dodge City — 5,650; 50,129.
  • Great Bend — 5,601; 27,674.
  • Hays — 5,561; 44,425.
  • Winfield — 5,491; 42,862.
  • Parsons — 5,302; 21,607.
  • Ottawa — 3,777; 25,992.
  • Osawatomie — 3,102; 32,787.
  • Liberal — 3,007; 50,804.
  • Columbus — 2,803; 21,603.
  • Chanute — 2,707; 25,921.
  • Hiawatha — 2,620; 9,984.
  • Phillipsburg — 2,048; 26,802.
  • Iola — 1,811; 16,680.
  • Concordia — 1,610; 29,762.
  • Colby — 1,168; 18,692.
  • Goodland — 1,389; 10,221.
  • Greensburg — 530; 4,444.
  • Larned — 464; 6,973.