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Archive for Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Creative cuts: Lawrence artists stand to lose thousands of dollars in Brownback’s proposed budget

Hailey Gillespie, youth education director with Theater Lawrence, second from right, encourages her young actors to emote happiness during Monday's "School's Out, Theatre's In" program, in which kids from around Lawrence participated in theater activities for Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The program is one that would be directly affected by Gov. Brownback's proposed funding cuts to the Kansas Arts Commission. The Lawrence Community Theater received a $7,840 Kansas Arts Education Leadership grant in the last fiscal year that helped to fund the "School's Out" program.

Hailey Gillespie, youth education director with Theater Lawrence, second from right, encourages her young actors to emote happiness during Monday's "School's Out, Theatre's In" program, in which kids from around Lawrence participated in theater activities for Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The program is one that would be directly affected by Gov. Brownback's proposed funding cuts to the Kansas Arts Commission. The Lawrence Community Theater received a $7,840 Kansas Arts Education Leadership grant in the last fiscal year that helped to fund the "School's Out" program.

January 19, 2011

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How cuts to the Kansas Arts Commission would affect the whole state

Tim Van Leer, executive director of the Lied Center of Kansas, explains how Gov. Brownback's proposed privatization of the Kansas Arts Commission would affect the state of artistic expression in Kansas and have a trickle down effect to those not directly receiving commission funds. Enlarge video

Where KAC grants went in 2011

This fiscal year, the Kansas Arts Commission is supporting 16 different Lawrence artists and art groups through 27 separate grants. Here’s a breakdown of where that $121,957 has gone.

  1. Americana Music Academy — $3,862
  2. Baldwin City Community Theater — $2,207
  3. Baldwin Community Arts Council — $1,696
  4. Downtown Lawrence Inc. — $2,000
  5. Francisca Maria Velasco — $5,000
  6. Friends of the Theatre (KU Endowment) — $2,742
  7. Lawrence Art Guild Association — $3,421
  8. Lawrence Arts Center — $16,766
  9. Lawrence Chamber Orchestra — $1,777
  10. Lawrence Children’s Choir — $14,286
  11. Lawrence Community Theatre (Theatre Lawrence) — $13,126
  12. Lucia Orth — $1,927
  13. Mari LaCure — $289
  14. The Lied Center — $16,286
  15. Spencer Museum of Art — $21,286
  16. Van Go Mobile Arts — $15,286

Total 2011 Fiscal Budget for Kansas –– $13.9 billion

This fiscal year, artists in Lawrence received $121,957 in grants from the Kansas Arts Commission.

As it stands now, the amount artists in Lawrence can expect next year from the commission stands at exactly zero.

That’s because on Jan. 13, Gov. Sam Brownback announced that as part of an effort to reduce the state budget, he’d be making cuts to the commission, which funds arts and arts organizations around the state through a series of grants. Moreover, the commission would become a privately funded nonprofit “in response to the current demands on the state general fund,” Brownback’s budget states.

His budget would give the commission $200,000 at the beginning of the fiscal year, July 1, to help with the transition before cutting off state money altogether. The move would save $574,642 “and will encourage the organization in maximizing its fee and private sector revenue, as well as increase the organization’s commitment to seeking all available federal and foundation funds,” the budget says.

But, doing so would cost the state a lot more than it saves, says Llewellyn Crain, executive director for the commission. She explains that the state would also lose federal funds if it lost its arts commission. Moreover, as a private entity, the commission would be competing for donations against the organizations it helps just to stay afloat.

“We don’t know what the National Endowment for the Arts would do in terms of providing us with funds. They may choose to not fund us at all because they require that the state make a financial commitment that’s equal to the amount of money they provide,” says Crain, who notes that Kansas would be the first state to cut all funds to its state arts agency. “So our federal funds would either be severely diminished or would disappear entirely.”

And the city of Lawrence would lose out quite a bit, too. This fiscal year, 16 artists and art groups benefited from small grants obtained through the commission. Groups such as Van Go Mobile Arts, the Lied Center, The Lawrence Community Theatre (Theatre Lawrence), the Lawrence Children’s Choir, the Americana Music Academy, the Lawrence Chamber Orchestra and the Lawrence Art Guild Association. Each of the individual grants average out to be about $4,500, though most amount to much less, but it’s money well spent says Mary Doveton, executive director of the Theatre Lawrence.

“While, in the great scheme of things, it isn’t an enormous amount of money, it does enable us to do very significant things within the community, particularly for the kids,” says Doveton, who says much of the money goes directly to the group’s “School’s Out, Theater’s In” program and other youth educational programs.

In fact, children will be most severely affected by the lack of funding, many local sources say, because many of the grants are specifically requested as funds that go to education. In fact, a little more than half of the funds Lawrence received this fiscal year — $61,840 — were specifically earmarked for education.

“We do generally spend the money on scholarships, we try to make sure that anybody who wants to take music lessons at the school is able to do that,” says K.C. Compton, president of the board of directors at Americana Music Academy. “If the cuts happen, that was a big chunk of our income last year. And so it’s very scary to contemplate what might happen ... if that’s cut, that would be really, really dangerous to the continuance of the organization.”

And the education isn’t just for the children, Crain points out. She says that many adult artists come to Lawrence specifically to train, and then bring their art to other parts of the state.

“(Lawrence is) known for its arts and it’s known for its music. And for Kansas to then say, ‘Well, sorry,’ doesn’t recognize the value that a community like Lawrence brings to our state,” Crain says. “For the state not to invest in that, (it) would not only have a negative impact on your community, but also have a negative impact on the state as a whole.”

The negative impact also might affect other businesses in Lawrence from what Doveton calls the “trickle down effect.” For example, if someone buys a ticket to see a Theatre Lawrence production, he or she might go out to dinner beforehand, or get ice cream or drinks afterward, meaning other local businesses will lose out, too. Also, the show in question might have sets built with lumber or decorated with paint bought directly from a locally owned hardware store, meaning more money missing from the local economy. A 2007 study by Americans for the Arts found that statewide, nonprofit arts and culture organizations and their audiences spent more than $153.5 million.

The commission grants aren’t the only source of income for these arts entities, but it’s important, consistent money that makes a difference says Lynne Green, executive director of Van Go Mobile Arts. She says that the $15,286 Van Go received from the commission this year is money that’s expected and needed to support the program, which serves at-risk children. And what’s most infuriating to her is that while she won’t be able to help as many children without the money, the state won’t be saving but pennies in the scheme of a proposed $13.9 billion budget.

“It’s nothing. It’s nothing. You know? That’s what’s so ridiculous. What it becomes, from my perspective then, is it’s just symbolic,” Green says. “A culture, a city, a citizenry without its art is a very pathetic citizenry. People need art for their soul.”

Comments

Eybea Opiner 3 years, 9 months ago

Get the state and the federal government out of the arts business. If your art has value it will find patrons.

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Bob_Keeshan 3 years, 9 months ago

Yes, the state should stick to the oil and gas business where it belongs, plus the agriculture business, plus the bioscience business, plus the telecom business...

You cannot say the state should be "out" of the arts business when the state is "in" so many others, and the proponents of getting out of the arts business have no intention of getting out anywhere else.

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25 3 years, 9 months ago

Actually, it makes sense to say the state should be out of the arts businesses, even in consideration that the state invests in other businesses. The economy is down and the budget is tight, which means we don't have the excess to spend on non-critical or non-revenue producing areas. Of course, you'll say the arts are critical, but not in balancing a budget and keeping the government running during a poor economic period.

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beatrice 3 years, 9 months ago

Feds out of the arts business -- does this mean the Army shouldn't have a buggle corp?

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 9 months ago

If these kids need art, they should get their parents to take them to a monster-truck show.

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Kontum1972 3 years, 9 months ago

wow a dance lesson from haley would be pretty smooth...

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jimmyjms 3 years, 9 months ago

Sure you do, grammar king.

BTW, you post on nearly every thread here, every day. Do you have a job?

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puddleglum 3 years, 9 months ago

defender , that response was awesome

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wakeupandsmellthedonuts 3 years, 9 months ago

The nonprofit arts and cultural sector is a $153.5 million industry that generates $15 million in local and state revenue. People who attend community arts events also shop, spend money on gasoline, dinner and childcare -- contributing to local economies. Think about this: businesses want to locate in communities that support quality of life such as schools, arts programs and libraries. Without those, cites are unable to compete in the marketplace - reduction in investing in these aspects of everyday life is why so many of our rual communties are struggling and dying out. Kansas private nonprofit arts and cultural sector supports over 4,000 full-time equivalent jobs and the creative arts industry in Kansas employs over 37,000 people. If the Kansas Arts Commission ceases to exist, many of these jobs will be cut, reduced or lost completely.

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TopJayhawk 3 years, 9 months ago

The key phrase there is Kansas supports over 4,000 full time jobs. Let them support themselves... If it is that popular, this should not be a problem. If it is...........shut it down like any other business would do. We can't afford this.

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jamieg99 3 years, 9 months ago

By this logic public schools and health care for the poor would disappear too. I never want to live in your world. It sounds really sad.

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haileygillespie 3 years, 9 months ago

Contributions from patrons and private donors are a significant piece of the puzzle, absolutely. However, the KAC and NEA require educational reports of curriculum guidelines and evaluative measurements that help ensure quality programming such as these. In addition, families and children who do not have the resources to "donate" have the opportunity to benefit from these art programs. Not to sound old fashioned, but I believe social media sites and texting can have a negative impact on how children are able to interact with one another. Theatre and the arts require abstract thinking, creative problem solving, empathy, collaboration, imagination..... and so, so much more.

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George_Braziller 3 years, 9 months ago

Art programs are also where a lot of kids can find their "place" in the world and be involved in something that excites them.

Team sports bored the hell out of me. I tried it and hated it. Art is where I found my passion and I excelled because it was something I loved.

Not all of us are athletes or even give a crap about sports but there never seems to be a shortage of funds to support banging around an inflated chunk of animal skin.

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bcolley 3 years, 9 months ago

Wow, lots of arts haters here.

The article shows a picture of children because the article states that half the funding from the Kansas Arts Commission goes to educational programs for children, not out-of-work "hippies" living off the government.

I'm someone who drives from Kansas City, Missouri to Lawrence several times a year specifically for arts events. I also buy gas, eat at your locally owned restaurants, go shopping at your local mom and pop shops. I would never go to Lawrence if you didn't have a vibrant arts scene. I don't go there to eat and shop, I go there for art. When people ask me about living in Lawrence, I say yes, because you have a great arts scene. A city without art is nothing.

You want to limit the arts to only that which makes money? Take a look at the art that makes money and you'll see just how boring life will be. Art is your culture and it's what your community will be known and remembered for, and if your arts scene is as vibrant as Lawrence's is, it brings far more money into the community than it costs. Kansas has a bad enough tourism problem as it is. Cutting the arts will only make it worse. The only people going to Kansas will be the people in a hurry to get across it.

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25 3 years, 9 months ago

"Art is your culture and it's what your community will be known and remembered for, and if your arts scene is as vibrant as Lawrence's is, it brings far more money into the community than it costs. Kansas has a bad enough tourism problem as it is. Cutting the arts will only make it worse. The only people going to Kansas will be the people in a hurry to get across it."

Great point. Then we wouldn't have things like wooden constructions on the corner downtown with little smiley faces made out of typed characters. That would truly make Lawrence boring. I bet a ton of people come to Lawrence for subsidized dance classes and to see that red thing filled with rocks at the end of Mass Street.

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asdfjkl12 3 years, 4 months ago

WOW. WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU?!?!

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George Lippencott 3 years, 9 months ago

News Flash

Joe Citizen to lose thousands of dollars to new taxes to help starving Lawrence artists.

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jimmyjms 3 years, 9 months ago

News Flash

Joe Citizen to lose billions of dollars this year in defense spending "irregularities," outright fraud in Iraq and Afghanistan, etc., etc.

Byline: George Lippencott is old and grouchy.

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thatonedude 3 years, 9 months ago

Wrong, George. Joe Citizen already loses a grand total of 19 cents to help programs all over the state. That is all that would go back in your pocket from this cut, 19 cents. Meanwhile, educational programs like the one in the photo at the top of this story, among several other things, would be lost, thousands of people would lose jobs supported by grants from the KAC, and Kansas would have even less culture than it already does.

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wakeupandsmellthedonuts 3 years, 9 months ago

News flash: state of Kansas to lose 1.2 million dollars going to Kansas communities, schools and small businesses because of eliminating state arts agency: http://arts.ks.gov/index.shtml

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Kontum1972 3 years, 9 months ago

obtw there is an old hippie who runs the best darn candle shoppe in lawrence...get your info squared away DA

Hey Haley! thx for what you do...and your right on target about that texting poop....

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jimmyjms 3 years, 9 months ago

You've been psychologically conditioned in two years? Not very strong-willed, are you?

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jimmyjms 3 years, 9 months ago

The gigantic debt pie that wasn't important until a Dem was in the White House...right?

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gudpoynt 3 years, 9 months ago

and so your reaction is that ALL government funding ALWAYS has a negative consequence? Who is being psychologically conditioned?

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gudpoynt 3 years, 9 months ago

good. Then you don't mean ALL and ALWAYS.

Then can you tell me when you think SOME government funding SOMETIMES has a positive consequence?

Or better yet, can you explain the negative consequences of the state government continuing to set aside about one half of one hundredth of a percent of the budget for the arts commission?

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Boston_Corbett 3 years, 9 months ago

Yup, and I bet 75x55 signs up for and spends that socialistic health care program, Medicare, and that socialistic income support, Social Security.

The growth in government is me funding of his generation, not arts or public broadcasting, which are a gnat on the elephant's butt.

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dogsandcats 3 years, 9 months ago

I'm glad they listed how much various organizations receive in KAC grants. LCT gets $13k a year and they still charge ~$20 to see their mediocre shows? What a rip-off.

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bcolley 3 years, 9 months ago

$13,000 doesn't pay one person's salary for a year, let alone produce a full season of shows that takes dozens of people and thousands of dollars in sets, props, costumes, and equipment.

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gudpoynt 3 years, 9 months ago

Van Go Mobile Arts the Lied Center The Lawrence Community Theatre (Theatre Lawrence) the Lawrence Children’s Choir the Americana Music Academy the Lawrence Chamber Orchestra and the Lawrence Art Guild Association.

of these mentioned in the article, which are "fluff fluff" and why do you think so?

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Shardwurm 3 years, 9 months ago

It's a good start.

More cuts.

Then raise tuition at KU by $150 a credit hour.

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Darrell Lea 3 years, 9 months ago

I assume that every arts organization listed in the article is tracking this article and the comment thread.

Here's some advice: get started today making up whatever shortfall the funding cut will create through private donations and other means, and don't waste time complaining about what's being taken away.

I have worked in the music business in and around this town for a long time. Since what I do is considered "mainstream", I've had to earn my keep on my own. I have only received KAC funding one time, for one performance in Goodland. On the other hand, I have played for no compensation at multiple events held at the Lawrence Arts Center, and have played for free at fund raising events for Americana Music Academy. I chose to do this because I felt the causes were worthy, and because I did not have any paying work scheduled during those times.

Bob Dylan and Vincent Van Gogh were not subsidized by The State. Build a quality product and people will support it.

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notanota 3 years, 9 months ago

I assume every arts organization in Lawrence has long since learned that the comment threads in the LJW are not worth tracking.

Bod Dylan was a hum dinger folk singer with record contracts, but Vincent Van Gogh died in poverty from self-inflicted gunshot wounds. He could have benefited from both public arts funding and funding to mental health programs, both of which are things the state governor wants to cut.

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wakeupandsmellthedonuts 3 years, 9 months ago

Glad to hear you have done so well, and that you are making a living. You are contributing to the economic vitality of the state, and your community. While generous, the private philanthropists, collectors and patrons in Kansas do not have deep enough pockets to serve the entire state. They can't even fully support the arts that are currently here - thus the value and need for the Kansas Arts Commission. lAwrence receives about $75,000 in funding from the Kansas Arts COmmission, to support teh very exsistence - meaning lights, water bills, rent, equipemtn, electricity - at all the venues you mention in your post. If the Kansas Arts Commission is not a state agency, and becomes a 501c3, it will be competing for the same money that the organizations and people that is it trying to serve. Not an economouically productive situation for anyone - especially individual artists, and small and / or rural organizations. This is not a scenario that supports or encourges true economic vitality and growth in the state.

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overthemoon 3 years, 9 months ago

Products...? Young dancers? Art Education and enrichment? What are they selling? This commodity based mentality is moronic.

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George Lippencott 3 years, 9 months ago

Reduce tuition at KU by 20% and reduce professional staff accordingly

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Richard Heckler 3 years, 9 months ago

The arts is one essential tool that keeps humans of all ages grounded... especially our children

And it can be useful in the math and sciences...... don't kid yourselves

http://www.informedfamilylife.org/2004/11/what_characterizes_waldorf_hom.html

http://www.whywaldorfworks.org/02_W_Education/index.asp

http://www.live-education.com/

http://www.waldorfhomeschoolers.com/

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mr_right_wing 3 years, 9 months ago

So to support these essential arts you are a benefactor of Lawrence Community Theater..Lawrence Arts Center..Van Go Mobile Arts.all of these Richard??

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mr_right_wing 3 years, 9 months ago

Ok, forget $$, how much time do you volunteer at one of the many Lawrence arts organizations? They are all 'essential' right? So you must put in an hour here or there, right?

Volunteering would probably take up less time and effort than most or your incredibly long posts (and be much more effective!)

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overthemoon 3 years, 9 months ago

Are you kidding? Every artist you list was in someway associated with the WPA Arts project. That's how they made it through the depression. And look at the work they produced while on the gov't payroll. Their work became the visual chronicle of a time in our country that we can not afford to forget.

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overthemoon 3 years, 9 months ago

And if you buy art from a swank NYC auction house, I'd think you'd actually know how to spell the name of the business.

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Alceste 3 years, 9 months ago

This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

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TopJayhawk 3 years, 9 months ago

Not to mention the chip on your shoulder. Jeez. Why don't you pony up some bucks if this is so improtant?

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overthemoon 3 years, 9 months ago

Name one 'drone artist'. I dare ya'.

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ralphralph 3 years, 9 months ago

We had effingham for Christmas dinner; and effingturkey and some effingpotatoes, too.

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Richard Heckler 3 years, 9 months ago

Art Is An Industry

The Economic Impact of Nonprofit Arts and Culture Organizations and Their Audiences documents the key role played by the nonprofit arts and culture industry in strengthening our nation’s economy. This study demonstrates that the nonprofit arts and culture industry is an economic driver in communities—a growth industry that supports jobs, generates government revenue, and is the cornerstone of tourism.

Nationally, the nonprofit arts and culture industry generates $166.2 billion in economic activity every year—$63.1 billion in spending by organizations and an additional $103.1 billion in event-related spending by their audiences. The study is the most comprehensive study of the nonprofit arts and culture industry ever conducted. It documents the economic impact of the nonprofit arts and culture industry in 156 communities and regions (116 cities and counties, 35 multicounty regions, and five states), and represents all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

The $166.2 billion in total economic activity has a significant national impact, generating the following:

  1. 5.7 million full-time equivalent jobs

  2. $104.2 billion in household income

  3. $7.9 billion in local government tax revenues

  4. $9.1 billion in state government tax revenues

  5. $12.6 billion in federal income tax revenues

Economic Impact: http://www.AmericansForTheArts.org/Economicimpact

Information and Services http://www.artsusa.org/information_services/

.

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overthemoon 3 years, 9 months ago

Stopping funding for the Arts is exactly the wrong thing to do. One of the richest and most lasting contributions to our country's cultural heritage was the WPA arts program. Astounding, iconic photographs, cherished murals and sculpture in public venues across the country, the works of numerous artists who recorded and interpreted that perilous time in our history that have become part of the collective memory of our people. Many of these works continue to be destinations for tourism, educational programs and research.

There is much complaining about jobs...and the lack thereof. Why do we not see the potential for WPA and CCC type programs that provide people both job training and income instead of unemployment checks? Nearly every penny of money spent goes back into the economy. When gov't funding is only for 'infrastructure' it is only going to one sector of the work force while unemployment affects millions of people with useful skills and experience that could be put to use.

Not seeing the arts as a vital and important part of an advanced society is to take us further into a brain dead culture who will continue to fall behind in the world. Shameful. Absolutely shameful. As I have pointed out else where, we should be cutting subsidies that go to profitable businesses, to wasteful state contracts, and into the pockets of those who are making a killing while the rest of us slide closer to poverty every day.

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ralphralph 3 years, 9 months ago

  • WPA and CCC type programs that provide people both job training and income instead of unemployment checks? * Bravo!

People now expect, or even demand, "happiness" not "freedom to pursue happiness".

I don't think you could staff the WPA or CCC these days, at least not without being called cruel. People are now programmed to whine and hold out their hands, rather than gulp and roll up their sleeves.

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overthemoon 3 years, 9 months ago

I can tell you that the lines would be blocks long. The typical unemployed person of 2011 would LOVE to have the opportunity to use their skills while learning new ones. There are very few whiners among them...just folks who are mad as hell that their careers and lives have been ruined while the rich and corporations make out like bandits.

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sr80 3 years, 9 months ago

typical pol,eat from the public trough for 20 yrs in d.c. then come home to ruin kansas.

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Hudson Luce 3 years, 9 months ago

"This fiscal year, artists in Lawrence received $121,957 in grants from the Kansas Arts Commission."

Lawrence has at least 20,000 people who pay property taxes in the city. Add an "arts tax" of $10 per property, and there's $200,000 in money to support the arts in Lawrence. It's a benefit for all and it's part of what gives Lawrence its unique character. The schools are supported by property taxes and so are the city rec centers and swimming pools, which are only open during the summer months.

Or you could have Lawrence go the way of Topeka.

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thatonedude 3 years, 9 months ago

This cut effects the entire state. Artists elsewhere will still languish if Lawrence adds a new tax.

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geekin_topekan 3 years, 9 months ago

Now girls can learn dance from VH1 hoochie hour, and the boys musical inspiration from gangsta rap.

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Kansas_Citizens 3 years, 9 months ago

It is very important that the Kansas Arts Commission continue to exist as a state agency because of the federal dollars it is able to leverage, which offer opportunities for jobs, educational opportunities and other resources to all of our communities.

By cutting this agency, the state will lose more than a MILLION dollars annually - meaning that there is a net LOSS to the state by making this change. It is understood that times are tough - but this is not a smart way to handle the balancing of the budget.

This will ultimately be decided upon by our legislature and so it is important that you contact your legislator about this issue.

The Kansas Citizens for the Arts can be found online at www.kansasarts.org.

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ralphralph 3 years, 9 months ago

What is the status of the Federal grants, given the bankruptcy at that level?

I would tend to agree that, if the Federal money is getting handed out to States having an arts commission, then we probably need to stay in that line, or we lose more than we gain. If, though, that Federal funding carrot is being cut, then there is nothing to chase, and we might be better off shutting it down.

Hate to start any kind of P***ing Match, but in this era of ubiquitous field turf, one might want to keep an eye on treatment of the arts vs treatment of sports .... the former usually gets hosed first and hardest.

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thatonedude 3 years, 9 months ago

I don't have the exact figures off the top of my head, but the federal grants are still intact, and the state would lose something in the millions if the KAC were to be cut.

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Hudson Luce 3 years, 9 months ago

With the Kansas Legislature as it is now, and will be for the next two years, in my mind it's a very doubtful prospect indeed that the Kansas Arts Commission will exist at all, except perhaps as an unfunded shell organization with only an existence on paper. It is up to the community to step in where the State of Kansas will not, and as long as the State is in its current funding crisis, the arts community should not expect any tax dollars to fund what is seen by most of the Legislature as a luxury.

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mr_right_wing 3 years, 9 months ago

A very reasonable, realistic & respectable post.

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 9 months ago

People, don't sweat it. We'll have plenty of wholesome art opportunities once Brownback turns the Lawrence Arts Center into a Jesus Camp.

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mr_right_wing 3 years, 9 months ago

What is the average household income in this town? Are property taxes going up for an expanded library because people are starving? Why does Lawrence have a bank on almost every block?

We have an abundance of people who have the means to easily make up for what the government can no longer provide. We not only have plenty of people with the means, we have just as many people in this liberal arts college town who are 'art-minded'.

We will now find out how much of a priority art and culture is to Lawrence. Do we only want it if the government provides it? Or is it important enough that we're all willing to pitch in...?

The next move is yours...............................................................................................

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mr_right_wing 3 years, 9 months ago

.........................................are your continuing contributions to the Williams Fund, and your KUBB season tickets more important than the arts? We'll see...................

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thatonedude 3 years, 9 months ago

OR we could not pit two things against each other that have no reason to be pitted against each other, and people could still support both with the 19 cents that they currently pay in state taxes a year that go to support the KAC.

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plainspeaking 3 years, 9 months ago

There is a comment thread to several posts here, that it is government money - and only government money - funds the arts in Kansas, particularly in Lawrence. This is not true. To receive a grant from the Kansas Arts Commission, every local arts organization in Lawrence has to provide matching funds from other sources, including private donors. The state provides seed money to these organizations but only if the organization has a strategic/business plan, competent staff and a necessary service.

Lawrence has an outstanding mix of arts programs and organizations, but so do many other Kansas cities. Salina, Wichita, Lucas, Hays, Lindsborg, Emporia, Junction City and Ark City come to mind, but there are literally hundreds of organizations improving their communities across Kansas. In return for the state's contribution of $800,000 for the arts, its receives $150 million in revenue collected from visitors and Kansans who attend arts events and buy tickets or art.

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oldexbeat 3 years, 9 months ago

and western kansas, without enough population to support much art, will grow your grain without culture. Kansas -- now last in tourism spending and the only state without a state arts commission -- losers all around. Governor Sam Brownback attacks art first; next education -- watch that -- he doesn't trust public education to make the little children march to his tune. Sad.

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commuter 3 years, 9 months ago

Maybe Brownback should tax lawnmowing business $1 a gallon of gas to help fund the arts? To me, that is a good way to fund the arts.

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mr_right_wing 3 years, 9 months ago

Whomever was elected to public office this time around has some very hard decisions to make. Kansans (myself included) decided they trusted Mr. Brownback (and other reps in Topeka) to make those tough 'no-win' decisions. (Of which, this is far from the last!!)

Here...I'll go ahead and reply for some of you: "Well, Kansans are really STUPID morons then!"

Fine...your opinion...freedom of speech is beautiful regardless.

Call up your Obamassiah and tell Him to step in and interfere in state politics. (Hey...it's not that far fetched!) or, instead of being a San Franciscan wanna-be, move to the real place, you'll be much happier. (So will we.)

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mr_right_wing 3 years, 9 months ago

I'll speak (reply) on your behalf again: (You're welcome.)

Without you, this would be a religious-nut, backwards hickville hillbilly state.

Sticks and stones...

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Ralph Reed 3 years, 9 months ago

Interesting that you bring hatred for President Obama into a discussion about Brownback not wanting defund Kansas arts.

Usually Tom is the first to do this, but you beat him to it.

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7texdude 3 years, 9 months ago

If we are going to cut art, then we have to cut sports, too. Fair is fair. If kids who want to be artists have to pay for their own programs, then kids who want to play sports should have to pay for it, too.

How many coaches do we have in Kansas high schools? How many art teachers do we have in Kansas? Science? If we are going to cut school funding by millions of dollars, then athletics should have to go under the knife, too. Shorten the seasons, cut the number of coaches and support staff as well. It's not like a lot of these kids are going to play at Division I any way. Ohio and other schools up north are doing this. Kansas should follow their lead.

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booyalab 3 years, 9 months ago

I was making a list of reasons why we don't need government subsidized art in the information age, but then I realized all the links would be interpreted as spam. (spam would be a good addition to the list, actually. Brilliant avant-garde prose, if you ask me)

So here it is, and I shouldn't link to everything but you don't have to take my word for it since you're all online.

Top ten reasons why art doesn't need to be publicly subsidized in modern America

  1. Free or super cheap stock photos
  2. Free digital library on archive.org
  3. text message novels
  4. worth1000
  5. funny/interesting blogs - postsecret, hipster runoff, information is beautiful, all the great niche music blogs
  6. free web design resources
  7. computer games as art http://www.artificial.dk/articles/artgamesintro.htm
  8. open source software
  9. YouTube
  10. My personal favorite: creatively, humorously subverting online modes of communication. Some of the comments here are like miniature works of art. All sorts of wit abounds online, from fake networking profiles (Slate's Obama first 100 days feed on facebook, or I once saw General Zod from Superman on myspace) to ironic consumer reviews (check out wolf urine lure on amazon) Art shouldn't be a dreary obligation. It shouldn't be one of society's collective bills. People will make it because they love it, and other people will find out about it if the market is allowed to freely facilitate it. The big glowing rectangle you're looking at is living proof.
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7texdude 3 years, 9 months ago

Then why should sports get a free pass?

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mr_right_wing 3 years, 9 months ago

I just figured our (competitive) sports were self-supporting, or are you talking about physical education (P.E.) in our schools? Are you talking about Lawrence Parks & Rec programs (which I would figure user fees would cover.)??

Sports should not get a pass..if indeed the government is funding in a similar manner to art.

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 9 months ago

"if indeed the government is funding in a similar manner to art."

Spectator sports get way more government subsidies than art. Are you really unaware of that fact?

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mr_right_wing 3 years, 9 months ago

Sure am. Educate me 'bozo'; keep in mind I do not recognize 'wikipedia' as any kind of authority.

I'm not from Mo. but show me!!

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mr_right_wing 3 years, 9 months ago

'put up or shut up' bozo... I'm waiting....show me....

(merrill could do it....)

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mickeydsrocketdog 3 years, 9 months ago

You are right and wrong at the same time, my friend. While none of these are publicaly funded, and are incrediably valuable, exciting and fun ways to engage in the arts, where do you think any of the people or entities egaging in these activites ge their training, knowlegdge or undresatnding? I have a few words for it: public education, that includes public funding for the arts, both in schools and the community.

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mickeydsrocketdog 3 years, 9 months ago

... apologies for the type-o's - holding a baby and typing with one hand.

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bcolley 3 years, 9 months ago

So all art should be delivered through a computer? That's find if all you want to do is sit on your couch all year, but some art takes place in real buildings requiring large groups of people working together for the benefit of a live audience. This costs more money than a blog.

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irvan moore 3 years, 9 months ago

it's started, i saw on the news that the arts center cancelled classes tonight, wow, didn't take long to run out of money. oh, maybe it's the snow.

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mr_right_wing 3 years, 9 months ago

This winter storm was caused by......

.....you guessed it, George W!!

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commuter 3 years, 9 months ago

I think some people may be confused. The cut is to a state agency, not school districts, unless I am missing something

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thatonedude 3 years, 9 months ago

The state agency grants money to a lot of public schools to support their art programs.

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mickeydsrocketdog 3 years, 9 months ago

Its officiial: the state will lose 1.2 million dollars of federal money ift the Kansas Arts Commission is eliminated and turned itno a 501c3: http://arts.ks.gov/

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commuter 3 years, 9 months ago

From what I read, the money that Kansas will lose, is part of the Kansas Arts Commission.

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sunny 3 years, 9 months ago

'Arts' can retrieve the money from donations....and those cute little kiddies parents! Stop stealing from the tax payers!

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JayhawksandHerd 3 years, 9 months ago

"Sports" can retrieve money from donations...and those cute little kiddies parents! Stop stealing from the tax payers!

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JayhawksandHerd 3 years, 9 months ago

"The Military" can retrieve money from donations...and those cute little kiddies parents! Stop stealing from the tax payers!

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sunny 3 years, 9 months ago

The 'gov't' nor the 'city' is funding sports! Disappointment for you liberals...I know!

Sports are way more important than your 'arts' anyway!

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 9 months ago

"The 'gov't' nor the 'city' is funding sports!"

I'm having to guess at what you actually meant by the grammatical train wreck, but if my guess is right, your grasp of the facts is even worse than your grasp of grammar.

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bcolley 3 years, 9 months ago

Art is not a business.

Art is not created to make money. Art is created to enrich our lives, to educate us, bring us together, entertain and enlighten us, and make us better people. There is a business side to it because it costs money to create art, but it isn't created to make a profit. That's why the organizations given government grants are called non-profits. Their purpose is not to maximize earnings, but to serve the community. To insist that art be self-sustaining eliminates a wide swath of the art available in your community. It devalues your community, eliminates minority, fringe, and unpopular voices, and makes the world you live in far less interesting.

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just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 3 years, 9 months ago

I agree. There are plenty of folks involved in (some) non-profits because they pay exceedingly well. But isn't getting overpaid just the American Way?

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beatrice 3 years, 9 months ago

We don't need less art in our lives. We need more.

I'm glad the government supported the arts in Michelangelo's time.

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