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Archive for Monday, September 20, 2010

People in the news

September 20, 2010

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Randy Quaid found living in his old house

Santa Barbara, Calif. — Actor Randy Quaid and his wife are facing burglary charges in California after the owner of the couple’s old house reported they had been living there without permission.

A representative of the property owner called Santa Barbara County sheriff’s deputies Saturday afternoon to report that squatters had been staying in the guest house illegally. When deputies arrived at the house that evening, they found Randy and Evi Quaid, who said they had owned the property since the 1990s.

The property owner’s representative provided documents that showed his client had bought the home in 2007 from a man who had purchased it from the Quaids several years earlier. A contractor showed police more than $5,000 in damages to the guest house that he believed was caused by the Quaids.

Police arrested the Quaids on charges of felony residential burglary and entering a noncommercial building without consent, a misdemeanor. Police also charged Evi Quaid, 47, with resisting arrest.

Bail was set at $50,000 each. Messages left with Quaid’s attorney and agent were not immediately returned Sunday.

YouTube videos on list for Guggenheims

New York — Among the hundreds of thousands of videos uploaded daily to YouTube, surely a work of art is in there somewhere.

Such is the premise behind “YouTube Play: A Biennial of Creative Video,” the first curated search for videos of a higher brow on the popular Google Inc.-owned website. From among more than 23,000 submissions from 91 countries, 125 videos were shortlisted for the inaugural biennial.

A curatorial team from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York selected the videos, which will play at kiosks in Guggenheim museums in New York, Berlin, Bilbao, Spain, and Venice, Italy, beginning today.

A jury that includes filmmaker Darren Aronofsky and visual artist Takashi Murakami will whittle the results down further to about 20 videos. Those will be presented at the Guggenheim in New York on Oct. 21.

The chosen videos vary wildly, from well-known YouTube hits to little-seen works by students and amateurs.

More familiar selections include the OK Go music video “This Too Shall Pass,” which features a Rube Goldberg apparatus, a complicated machine designed to perform a simple task, and the “Human Mirror” video, in which a subway car is lined by apparent twins mimicking each other’s movements, by the comedy troupe Improv Everywhere.

Others are less heralded, like a jogging video by multimedia performer Jillian Mayer, in which rural video is projected against the urban landscape along her path.

Baltimore honors Zappa with bust

Baltimore — Rocker Frank Zappa was born in Baltimore but gained greater popular acclaim in Europe than in the United States. On Sunday, devout European fans of the late musician brought his mustachioed likeness back home in the form of a bronze bust.

Several hundred fans gathered on a sweltering afternoon as city officials dedicated the bust of the ponytailed rocker outside an east Baltimore library. The bust is a replica of another in a public square in Vilnius, Lithuania, and was donated to the city by Zappa enthusiasts in the small Baltic nation.

The mayor joined Zappa’s widow, Gail, and three of his grown children in watching as a curtain was drawn back to reveal the bust set atop a 12-foot steel pole. Later, Zappa’s son Dweezil took the stage with his tribute band, Zappa Plays Zappa.

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