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Archive for Friday, September 3, 2010

Ford CEO Alan Mulally praises his education, Lawrence during talk

Mulally ‘treasures’ education he received in Lawrence

Ford CEO and Lawrence native Alan Mulally greets friend Frank Becker, a Lawrence businessman, former regent of the Kansas Board of Regents and current advisory board member for KU’s School of Engineering, after the Community Education Breakfast Friday at the Lawrence Holidome, 200 McDonald Drive. Mulally served as the keynote speaker for the sold-out event, which benefits the Lawrence Schools Foundation. “I’ve know Alan for a long long time and he’s a wonderful young man,” Becker said.

Ford CEO and Lawrence native Alan Mulally greets friend Frank Becker, a Lawrence businessman, former regent of the Kansas Board of Regents and current advisory board member for KU’s School of Engineering, after the Community Education Breakfast Friday at the Lawrence Holidome, 200 McDonald Drive. Mulally served as the keynote speaker for the sold-out event, which benefits the Lawrence Schools Foundation. “I’ve know Alan for a long long time and he’s a wonderful young man,” Becker said.

September 3, 2010

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Ford CEO addresses school foundation

The president and CEO of Ford, Alan Mulally, addressed members of the Lawrence Schools Foundation Friday. Mulally was there to garner support for local education. Enlarge video

Alan Mulally

Alan Mulally, president and CEO of Ford Motor Company, offers his advice -- given his management experience at Boeing Co. and Ford -- to members of the Lawrence School board regarding the district's upcoming reconfiguration of Lawrence public schools.

Alan Mulally returned to Lawrence on Friday, giving back to the community that gave him so much — including a broad-based education that led to a career in engineering and business that shows no signs of slowing down.

“My education here, I treasure,” Mulally said, opening his remarks of the Lawrence Schools Foundation’s ninth annual Community Education Breakfast at the Lawrence Holidome. “I don’t think I’m any different than the day I graduated.”

Mulally, president and CEO of Ford Motor Company, delivered the keynote address for the event that drew more than 600 people. Through sponsorships and ticket sales, the breakfast generated more than $60,000 for the foundation, which supports Lawrence public schools.

The foundation pays salaries for educators in the district’s early-education program, provides grants for innovative projects, provides awards for outstanding teachers, finances scholarships for high school seniors and addresses other districtwide needs.

Also during the breakfast event, Superintendent Rick Doll honored these four students as “Student Champions,” deserving recognition for their leadership skills, academic performance and commitment to public service:

• Bethany Cobbs, Free State High School.

• Nolan Frank, Free State High School.

• Chris Gaston, Lawrence High School.

• Brittany Ray, Lawrence High School.

Mulally said he was honored to follow four such exemplary students, before sharing stories about his experiences at Ford and his memories of his early days in Lawrence.

He told the audience about making regular $1.25 deposits at Capitol Federal Savings — proceeds from selling TV Guides — before buying his first bike at Montgomery Ward. He laughed when reminded he’d received a B in English. And he turned to a bit of exaggeration when asked how his reputed prowess on the tennis courts had served him in the business world.

“It’s the answer to my success,” he said, drawing laughs.

After applauding a musical performance by 4-year-olds in the early-education program — “that was perfect,” he’d say afterward — Mulally stuck around for photos, chatted with friends and family and others attending the event.

Then he left with members of his security team for another stop in town, before heading back later for Michigan: KU, and the office of Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little.

Comments

slowplay 4 years, 4 months ago

Nice article, unfortunately, most Kansan's could care less about education. The state continues to put education on the back burner, reduce funding and institute polices and procedures that hinder educational progress. Individuals, especially those who do not have children in the school system, are more concerned with putting a few bucks back into their pockets than insuring that our youth receive the education they need and deserve. "Taxes are the price we pay for a civilized society," - Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

newmedia 4 years, 4 months ago

Also smart enough NOT to take a government bailout! Good job Mr. Mulally...

integritycounts 4 years, 4 months ago

slow you have to be kidding.....are you aware we spend over 50% of state general fund tax revenue on K-12 education. Many services for the disabled and elderly along with other critical social services are being comprimised because of the K-12 education community clamouring for more money. Kansas spends more of our general revenue funds on K-12 than our surrounding states and you say thats not enough. Maybe we can spend 75% our our general fund on education and tell the hungry to just skip a meal or the disabled to suck it up and quit complaining or the sick to take an aspirin and stay in bed. The education bretheren whining for more money in tough times is getting very nauseating.

Jimo 4 years, 4 months ago

"Kansas spends more of our general revenue funds on K-12 than our surrounding states"

Well, with the exception of Nebraska, all of our surrounding states have lousy educational systems and poor educational results. Seriously, Missouri? Oklahoma? Please!

Besides, it's not a competition among needs. The needs are what they are and it's the job of those in Topeka to find the revenue to pay for those needs. If Kansas were a prudently run state, we'd have a constitutional provision requiring that an independent body study and certify that all these needs were both being presently met and a rainy day fund to cover economic downturns was in place before taxes could ever be cut. For now, that constitutional provision is only in place to cover education (as the Legislature learned a few years ago).

KEITHMILES05 4 years, 4 months ago

Guy has a security team? Wow. I didn't know people would want to kidnap the head of Ford but suppose there's good reason for such a detail.

compmd 4 years, 4 months ago

I had the good fortune of being able to meet Alan personally, unexpectedly though. His security was thoughtful and professional.

Think of how many people die in car accidents and have crazy relatives. Also remember he was the president of Boeing Commercial Aircraft. Think of people who died in plane crashes who have crazy relatives. I don't blame him for having security.

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