Archive for Thursday, July 8, 2010

Also from July 8

Audio clips
Births
Blog entries
Obituaries
On the street
Photo galleries
The day in photos, July 8, 2010
Podcasts
Polls
Which sports story are you paying more attention to, LeBron James or the World Cup final?

Poll results

Response Percent
Neither
 
56%
World Cup
 
30%
LeBron James
 
12%
Total 818
Videos

Lead stories

12:00 a.m.
KU Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little discusses the resignation of Kansas Athletic Director Lew Perkins during a press conference Thursday, at the Dole Institute.  Perkins will retire Sept. 4, 2011. KU’s Chancellor collecting second-largest payout from North Carolina state pension fund
July 6, 2010 in print edition on 1A
In addition to her Kansas University salary, Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little receives $209,337 annually from a North Carolina pension plan.
6:00 a.m.
James Thompson, attorney for Samantha Green, the widow of John Green, who was killed in the Cat Tracker accident, displays a computer image of the top deck of the Cat Tracker bus Wednesday during testimony in Douglas County District Court. John Green died Nov. 18, 2006, when he struck his head on the Irving Hill Road overpass as the bus attempted to pass under it on its way to Memorial Stadium for the Kansas University vs. Kansas State football game. Survivor recounts details of Cat Tracker fatality as civil case opens in Lawrence
July 7, 2010 in print edition on 1A
Testimony begins in fatal Cat Tracker accident.
10:00 a.m.
David R. Freeman: Lawrence developer who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit bank fraud in relation to land-development bribery case in Junction City. He also, his attorney Carl Cornwell says, provided information to federal prosecutors, IRS and FBI about ticket problems — involving “hundreds of thousands of dollars” in tickets for KU regular-season and tournament games — involving both Kansas Athletics Inc. and the Williams Fund, problems that spurred the KU investigation that led to five resignations of Kansas Athletics personnel. 
Freeman’s disclosures already had triggered the federal investigations that Cornwell expects to lead to federal charges including theft, money laundering and tax evasion. 
He owned land and started construction of a home that now is owned and occupied by KU Coach Bill Self. Lawrence developer David Freeman begins prison sentence at Arkansas facility
July 7, 2010 in print edition on 3A
A Lawrence man whose disclosures to federal investigators led to KU uncovering a theft of nearly 20,000 athletics tickets worth up to $3 million is now in federal custody.
2:00 p.m.
In a sign of the city's fiscal woes, City Manager David Corliss turned down a raise in his salary as part of his annual evaluation in October 2006. Corliss is pictured in his office at that time. The current fiscal status isn't any better. Investigator finds no evidence that Lawrence City Manager David Corliss made racial slur
2:11 p.m., July 7, 2010 Updated 2:21 p.m. in print edition on 1A
An independent investigation was inconclusive on whether City Manager David Corliss uttered the phrase “spear-chucker” during a staff meeting, but the investigator found no evidence that Corliss was trying to make a racial slur.
6:00 p.m.
A ticket scalper offers tickets to fans passing by before 2009 home game. The Kansas Athletic Department is now working to rebuild confidence in the ticket office after officials within the department reportedly sold tickets independently of the department. Two guilty pleas expected in KU athletics ticket scandal
1:37 p.m., July 7, 2010 Updated 7:45 a.m. in print edition on 1A
Two former Kansas Athletics Inc. employees are facing federal charges that they knew about a ticket-theft scheme without telling authorities in a timely manner.

All stories

Healthy legacy
Douglas County residents should be grateful for ongoing efforts of Bert Nash Community Mental health center.
July 8, 2010 in print edition on A8
The upcoming 60th anniversary celebration for Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center provides a good reminder of how much this agency and the services it provides have meant — and continue to mean — to Douglas County.