Archive for Saturday, May 16, 2009

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Police investigating sex crime that occurred Thursday morning
May 16, 2009
Lawrence police officers are investigating a sex crime that occurred Thursday morning in the 1300 block of Vermont Street. Officers were called to Lawrence Memorial Hospital Friday night at 10:44 p.m. There, they found a 22-year-old KU student who said she was sexually assaulted Thursday morning at an acquaintance’s home on Vermond Street.
Pump patrol
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B1
The Journal-World found gas prices as low as $2.19 at several locations.
Off to a rough start
Jayhawks flustered by K-State ace Morris
May 16, 2009 in print edition on C1
Kansas University fell to 11th-ranked Kansas State, 4-1.
Faith Forum: What can you learn by listening to a person of another faith?
May 16, 2009 in print edition on D1
Lessons learned.
Old Home Town - 100 years ago
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B7
From the Lawrence Daily World for May 17, 1909: “A cloudburst on the upper Wakarusa River yesterday led to flooding that caused serious loss to corn and wheat crops. No livestock seem to have been lost. … A new factory, the Lawrence Cabinet Works, started today. There are six workmen.”
FCE news
May 16, 2009 in print edition on D3
The Vinland FCE will meet at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday at Vinland United Methodist Church, 1724 N. 692 Road, Baldwin City, with Nora Cleland as hostess. The lesson, “Fashion An Easier Life With Assistive Technology,” will be given by Nora Cleland and Mariann Bradley.
Afghan ‘Guardian’ project develops slowly
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B6
The six young men looked too scrawny to fulfill the high hopes placed on their shoulders. They were members of the Afghan Public Protection Program, an auxiliary police force recruited from local villages in strategically important Wardak province. The force has been compared (mistakenly) to the Sunni militias that helped U.S. troops stem al-Qaida violence in Iraq.
GM to eliminate 1,100 U.S. dealers
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A3
General Motors on Friday told about 1,100 of its dealers — one in five — that they would be dropped by late next year, adding to the economic pain radiating from the beleaguered Detroit automakers to cities and towns across the country.
Obama revives terrorism tribunals, dismaying liberals
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A2
President Barack Obama said Friday he would reform and restart the military tribunals he once reviled for Guantanamo Bay detainees, jeopardizing his timetable for closing the prison by January and dismaying many supporters who suggested he was going back on campaign promises.
Recession freezing out cold-weather baseball
May 16, 2009 in print edition on C8
It was about the worst day Northern Iowa coach Rick Heller could have imagined when he had to tell his team that the university was cutting the program at the end of the year to cover a budget shortfall.
Tisdale on hand for net cutting
May 16, 2009 in print edition on C3
Wayman Tisdale was part of the Oklahoma team that clipped the nets at Kansas University’s Allen Fieldhouse in 1984.
The art of the walk-up song
Jayhawks discuss tune’s importance
May 16, 2009 in print edition on C5
Nick Faunce’s introduction to matters involving the walk-up song — that is, the song played throughout a stadium as a particular player walks to the plate — came four years ago, during his red-shirt freshman season with the Kansas University baseball team.
Students competing in design contest
May 16, 2009 in print edition on E1
Seven Lawrence High students are heading to Knoxville, Tenn., this week to compete in the National Construction Challenge Finals. After winning first, second and third at the Kansas City region, the Lawrence High students will take on 46 other teams from around the country in the three-part competition. The national event will be Wednesday through Saturday.
Old Home Town - 40 years ago
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B7
Plans for the proposed new humanities building at Kansas University were being pared down to solve financial problems. Architects for the work stood to make $200,000 even if nothing else was done. The Board of Regents learned that after saying it would start from scratch to meet the scaled-down budget.
Tisdale’s death saddens Jayhawks
Self, Manning recall former OU great
May 16, 2009 in print edition on C1
Bill Self and Danny Manning recalled former Oklahoma standout Wayman Tisdale, who died of cancer at age 44.
Mothers, sons to graduate together
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B8
Vicki Bechard and Janna Terry didn’t dine on the typical college student fare of ramen noodles when they were attending college nearly a year ago at Emporia State University. It was summer, Terry jokingly pointed out, and the best friends instead had plenty of $5 footlongs at Subway — half for lunch and half for the evening meal.
Jayhawks still popular attractions
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B5
The Jayhawks on Parade statues in Lawrence again are the center of attention, as Kansas University graduates pose for photos before departing Mount Oread. “The party is over, but it’s definitely exciting, too, because I’m starting a new leg in life,” Nick Pham, a graduating senior said Friday as he posed next to the Classic Jayhawk statue in front of the Kansas Union.
Free State baseball wins flip, right to host
May 16, 2009 in print edition on C3
Free State will serve as host for a Class 6A state baseball regional.
Bird not the word for Derby-winning jockey
May 16, 2009 in print edition on C8
Calvin Borel has complete confidence his horse will win the Preakness, the kind of gravitas expected from the Kentucky Derby-winning jockey. Except Borel won’t be riding the Derby winner today.
KU’s Powers 10-over
May 16, 2009 in print edition on C3
Kansas University’s Emily Powers shot a first-round 10-over-par 81 at the Duramed FUTURES Tour event.
Kansas’ Tarasova fourth in hammer
May 16, 2009 in print edition on C3
Kansas’ Zlata Tarasova placed fourth in the women’s hammer throw at the Big 12 Outdoor.
Close-knit Cavs not just the LeBron show
May 16, 2009 in print edition on C6
Absent from any box score and unseen on TV highlights, the moment passed without fanfare. Earlier this year, LeBron James did something that may best define his breakthrough season with the Cavaliers.
Los Angeles not looking like best team in West
May 16, 2009 in print edition on C6
Kobe vs. LeBron would bring the best player buzz to the NBA finals, and Lakers-Celtics is always a can’t-miss matchup. Nobody really considered that the Lakers wouldn’t show up.
Pointing is newest sign in baseball
May 16, 2009 in print edition on C2
Signs, signs, everywhere the signs. Back in the day it was fairly simple to figure them out in baseball. One finger for a fastball, two for a curve, maybe a third for whatever extra pitch the guy on the mound at the time might have.
Ramirez talks to team
Slugger tells Dodgers he’s sorry for suspension
May 16, 2009 in print edition on C2
Manny Ramirez walked into a South Florida hotel conference room Friday afternoon, hugged his teammates and coaches, then anxiously faced the group. I’m sorry, he said. And the Los Angeles Dodgers believed him.
Royals’ streak over
May 16, 2009 in print edition on C7
Zack Greinke pitched seven innings to earn his seventh win, Miguel Olivo hit a three-run homer, and the Kansas City Royals ended a six-game losing streak with an 8-1 victory over the Baltimore Orioles on Friday night.
Firebird’s quarterfinal on hold
Gauto Mariotti splits first two sets before bad weather strikes
May 16, 2009 in print edition on C1
Free State’s Rodolfo Gauto Mariotti reached the quarterfinals of the Class 6A state tournament.
Vendors cater to couples seeking to survive recession
May 16, 2009 in print edition on D5
Brides are still saying “I do” in 2009, but they’re saying “I don’t” to lavish weddings. For many, spending $22,000 and up is unrealistic amid a recession. Some brides are taking the do-it-yourself route, making their own invitations, centerpieces and favors.
Border checks intensify with mixed results
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A7
Hawks circle above the lines of traffic at the hot, arid border crossing into Mexico. Sagebrush catches clothes tossed by fence climbers. Three curious, dusty horses watch the federal agents tapping on car windows, opening trunks, looking in vain for contraband.
Military news
May 16, 2009 in print edition on D5
Army Reserve 1st Lt. Andrew K. Sneegas has been mobilized and activated for deployment overseas to a forward operating base in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Sneegas, a platoon leader with six years of military service, is normally assigned to the 323rd Military Intelligence Battalion, Fort George G. Meade, Laurel, Md.
Club news
May 16, 2009 in print edition on D5
University Bridge Club announces results of its May 9 meeting, with hosts Janet Dunn, Donna Gatts, Bebe Huxtable, Ruth Harwood and Steven Bogler. Blue winners were Florence McNicoll, first; Dan Harden, second; Al Smith, third; Tom Waller, fourth; and Virginia Williams, fifth.
Will Obama pay political price for deficit?
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B6
President Barack Obama’s detailed budget had hardly become public when members of Congress began to criticize specific reductions in funds for their states. That’s par for the course.
Dealer tradeoffs
In some cases, closing local dealerships to cut costs may be a bad trade-off for GM and Chrysler.
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B6
It would seem that the top priority for any manufacturing business would be to encourage the sale of its products. With that in mind, the decisions to close so many Chrysler and GM dealerships is curious. In a bankruptcy filing designed to financially stabilize its operation, Chrysler named 789 dealerships slated for closing.
Prof uses teachable moment
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B7
President Barack Obama arrives at Notre Dame on Sunday already triumphant, the champion of the pro-abortion rights lobby ready to be honored by America’s pre-eminent Roman Catholic university. This controversy has been spun as Catholics opposing a president offering a commencement address at Notre Dame. That’s not really the issue.
Garage sale to help pay medical bills
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B1
Lecompton resident Tom McNish will conduct a garage sale to raise money for his brother, Tim, who lost his son, Blake, last month. Blake, 11, died April 24 of a brain tumor. The garage sale will be June 5, 6 and 7, starting at 7 a.m. each day. It will end June 7 at noon. The garage sale will be at Tim’s house in Lecompton, 440 E. Seventh St.
Free self-defense clinic set for May 30
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B1
The next free self-defense clinic at the Lawrence Tae-Kwon-Do School, 1846 Vt., will be from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. May 30. Grand-Master Ki-June Park said participants should bring a cane or a stick to class. If participants have more than one cane, they should bring extra to share with others who do not have one, Park said. For more information, call 841-5661.
Haskell receives stimulus funds
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B1
Haskell Indian Nations University is the recipient of federal economic stimulus dollars, to go toward maintenance and health projects. The university has received just under $2 million for several maintenance projects, including replacement heat pump units, a replacement telephone system and new plumbing in three buildings.
2009 marks time of change for graduates — and KU
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B1
Commencements, whether at a high school, college, university, military academy or any other educational institution, are special events in so many ways. They mark the successful completion of a rigorous academic exercise and, at the same time, the beginning of new opportunities and new responsibilities.
KBA considers $600K for KU center
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B1
The Kansas Bioscience Authority is looking to set aside $600,000 to support Kansas University Cancer Center’s quest to become a National Cancer Institute center. After a two-hour executive session, the KBA’s investment committee passed along a recommendation to earmark the money for this fiscal year. The entire board will vote on the recommendation Tuesday morning at a meeting in Atlanta.
Old Home Town - 100 years ago
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B6
From the Lawrence Daily World for May 16, 1909: “A memorial is being planned for the late John G. Haskell, for many years a prominent citizen of Lawrence and a lifetime worker for the Congregational Church. He was a designer of many scenic and admired buildings. … The university is planning the most elaborate commencement in its history. There are to be some 320 graduates, a record number.”
State loses inmate labor
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B4
The closing of the minimum-security unit at the El Dorado Correctional Facility will mean the loss of thousands of hours of inmate labor, officials said. The Kansas Department of Corrections announced closing of the minimum-security unit at the prison this week. The closing, part of $6 million in cuts the Department of Corrections is making, is projected to save the department $1.2 million.
CDC seeing more regular flu cases
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A6
U.S. health officials are seeing a surprisingly high number of cases of ordinary, seasonal flu at a time when the flu season typically peters out. About half of people recently testing positive for the flu have the new swine flu virus, Dr. Daniel Jernigan of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta said Friday.
Astronauts overcome repair trouble
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A6
Spacewalking astronauts had to put a refurbished pair of gyroscopes into the Hubble Space Telescope after a brand new set refused to go in Friday, but scientists were satisfied nonetheless and confident the observatory would point precisely to ever more distant objects in the cosmos.
Boutique offering free matinee memberships
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B8
Lawrence’s Body Boutique is joining a national initiative to keep teens active during the summer. According to the U.S. Surgeon General, only 25 percent of teens are active for the recommended 30 minutes a day, five days a week.
Police use stun gun on stuffed cougar toy
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A3
The fluff was flying when police in suburban Detroit zapped a large stuffed cat with a stun gun while responding to an emergency call about a cougar on the loose. A 911 caller reported seeing what looked like a cougar inside a piece of discarded drain pipe in Warren. Police zapped the cat with an electronic weapon on Monday, but they wound up with a bunch of fluff.
Scientists launch largest space telescope
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A3
As American astronauts overhauled the aging Hubble, European scientists launched an even larger space telescope toward a far-flung orbit, hoping to help answer two questions: How did the cosmos begin and are we alone in it?
Scared Somalis running out of food
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A3
Hundreds of foreigners fighting alongside Somali Islamic insurgents have driven this week’s fierce battles against government forces, which have killed more than 100 people, the U.N. envoy to Somalia said Friday. Concern that the government might fall is mounting. Observers fear that if the al-Qaida linked insurgents seize the capital, they will gain a safe haven on the Horn of Africa.
Poll: More Americans calling themselves pro-life
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A3
A Gallup Poll released Friday found that 51 percent of Americans now call themselves pro-life rather than pro-choice on the issue of abortion, the first time a majority gave that answer in the 15 years that Gallup has asked the question.
Spike in Afghan bombings predicted
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A3
Strategically buried in the middle of dirt roads, packed in culverts and attached to trip wires, a heightened hidden danger awaits the thousands of U.S. troops pouring into Afghanistan to fight a tenacious Taliban. The U.S. military expects a 50 percent spike this year in roadside and suicide bombings, which surpassed the number of similar strikes in Iraq during the spring.
Historical society gets grant for repairs
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B3
The Kansas Historical Society has awarded a grant to the Vinland Fairgrounds Exhibit Building in Douglas County to repair its clerestory windows. The Heritage Trust Fund Grant of $10,992 will fund repair of the historic wooden windows for the fairgrounds north of Baldwin City.
Series to address senior, caregiver issues
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B3
A summer series aims to provide information about issues concerning seniors and caregivers during lunchtime on Thursdays. It also is designed to spark conversation and provide support. Programs will be from noon to 1 p.m. in the Lawrence Public Library’s gallery room, 707 Vt., and participants should bring a sack lunch.
Storms spur flash flooding problems
Fire Medical crews rescue stranded drivers
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B3
More than three inches of rain fell in parts of Douglas County in a two-hour period Friday afternoon, leading to widespread flash flooding problems in Lawrence and rural areas. Lawrence-Douglas County Fire Medical crews rushed to the 1300 block of Brook Street in east Lawrence around 6 p.m. to help two people after their car became stranded in the high water.
Mayor resigns after election, presiding over 2 meetings
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B3
Less than a month after accepting Linwood’s top political position, Ed Morris said he’s had enough. On Friday afternoon, Morris submitted his letter of resignation to the Linwood City Clerk. “They don’t understand what is going on around them for one thing,” Morris said about the council. “And they don’t want my input in it, so I’m not going to waste my time.”
College breaks ‘Thriller’ dance record
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A2
In what the organizer jokingly calls a case of his “Michael Jackson obsession gone wrong,” a group of College of William & Mary students has won the world record for most people to dance to the singer’s “Thriller” simultaneously in one place.
Prices crash for expensive melons
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A2
The latest victim of Japan’s recession is round, sweet and famous for being shockingly expensive. The first two Yubari melons of the season were auctioned Friday in northern Japan and fetched 500,000 yen ($5,200). Pricey? Certainly. But it’s practically a steal if you consider last year’s winning bid — a record 2.5 million yen, or about $26,000. In 2007 they sold for 2 million yen.
LMH doctor to discuss stroke awareness
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B3
Lawrence Memorial Hospital is having a free educational program about strokes. Dr. John Clark will present Stroke: How to Diagnose and Treat from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday at Lawrence Memorial Hospital, 325 Maine.
Cop suspended for ticket-issuing spree
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A2
A Boston police officer has been suspended for ticketing a slew of vehicles parked near the Statehouse on the same day the state Senate cut funding for a police education bonus program. Police department spokeswoman Elaine Driscoll told the Boston Herald that internal affairs is investigating whether the ticketing spree was “improper use of authority.”
Freed U.S. journalist returns to West
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A2
After four months in an Iranian prison, American journalist Roxana Saberi was savoring her first taste of freedom back in the West — beaming a confident smile Friday upon touching down in Austria’s capital but keeping silent about the details of her ordeal.
Military cuts off rebel sea escape
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A2
Sri Lankan forces took control of the entire island’s coastline today, trapping the Tamil Tigers in a tiny pocket of territory and cutting off any sea escape for the rebels’ top leaders, the military said. The latest military success came after President Mahinda Rajapaksa declared that his soldiers would end the island’s bloody civil war in 48 hours, a deadline that ends today.
Source: GOP gov. to be named envoy to China
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A2
President Barack Obama intends to name Utah’s Republican Gov. Jon Huntsman, seen by many as a potential GOP presidential contender, to be ambassador to China, a source close to the governor said Friday night. The popular moderate governor has accepted the appointment, said the source, who would speak only on condition of anonymity ahead of a White House announcement expected today.
McCain: Gun limits wouldn’t stop cartels
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A4
The drug war in Mexico shouldn’t be used as an excuse to try to restrict American gun rights, Sen. John McCain said Friday at the National Rifle Association’s convention. The Arizona Republican and former presidential candidate told thousands of people in Phoenix that the United States needs to do more to crack down on gun smuggling into Mexico, but that such assistance in Mexico’s war against drug cartels doesn’t require restrictions on the gun rights of law-abiding Americans.
Sunflower track postponed
May 16, 2009 in print edition on C3
Bad weather forced the postponement of the Sunflower League track and field meet.
Audit reveals need for improved lighting
7% of street lights don’t work at any given time
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A1
The city spends about $35,000 per year for street lights that aren’t producing light, according to a new audit out of City Hall. The audit of the street light system that is owned and operated by Westar Energy has city leaders vowing to ask questions of the Topeka-based utility.
Graduating KU student leaves legacy for veterans
Marine’s mission was to help others
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A1
Dan Parker knew he wanted to be in the Marine Corps when he received his first Gung-Ho G.I. Joe — outfitted in classic dress blues. Parker grew up in Fredonia and then McPherson with his mom, Sherrilyn Gerdel; dad, Craig; and older brother, Matt. At age 14, Dan lost his brother to a boating accident. Growing up in smaller Kansas towns, he said, gave him a thirst to experience more of what the world had to offer.
Gateway to 150: Long subject to urban legend, Stull church opens new center for sesquicentennial
May 16, 2009 in print edition on D1
For decades, the former home of Stull United Methodist Church was the destination of thrill seekers around northeastern Kansas, who came to the abandoned building perched above a cemetery enraptured by stories of the old church being one of the “seven gateways to Hell.”
People in the news
May 16, 2009 in print edition on D7
• Shields upset by media glare in Sutherland case • Parton expanding her literacy program • Brit actor Vinnie Jones acquitted in bar fight • Vanessa Hudgens tries to break from Disney • Rapper T.I. going to Ark. for prison term • Lionel Richie, Lauper among ’Idol’ acts
Horoscopes
May 16, 2009 in print edition on D7
This year, you become more open. You could transform your view and perspective, allowing many more options to appear. Doors open, and you experience so much more good will, especially within your community and immediate circle. If you are single, you meet people with ease. If you are attached, share more of the limelight with your sweetie. Go out and about more often together.
On the record
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B2
• Lawrence police arrested a 52-year-old man early Friday morning on charges of aggravated battery, obstruction and criminal damage to property. • A 38-year-old Lawrence man reported that a 17-inch Sony HDTV was stolen about 7 a.m. Thursday. Prescription medication was also stolen in the incident.
Around and about
May 16, 2009 in print edition on D3
Crystal and Kevin McComas, Lawrence, announce the adoption of their son, Eli Garrett McComas, born March 2, 2009, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital, with the adoption finalized April 13. Ellie Berland, 15, and Charnele Franklin, 17, both of Lawrence, have been chosen as state finalists in the National American Miss Kansas Pageant July 26-27 at the Hyatt Regency in Wichita.
Scouting news
May 16, 2009 in print edition on D3
Cub Scout Pack 3057, chartered to St. John Catholic School PTO, held Scout Sunday and Blue and Gold Feb. 15 at St. John the Evangelist Church, with the Rev. Earl Meyer, celebrating the Mass. Scouts and Scouters from Troops 52, 53, 55, 59, 64 and Packs 3013, 3055, 3057 and 3071 participated and helped at the Mass.
Pope ends Holy Land trip with call for peace
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A7
Pope Benedict XVI ended his pilgrimage to the Holy Land Friday with a stirring call for peace at the site of Jesus’ crucifixion and then made an emotional appeal to Israel and the Palestinians: “No more bloodshed. No more fighting. No more terrorism. No more war.”
Killing of Americans in Tijuana sows fear
Police investigate possible ties to drug trade
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A7
The slayings of four young Americans in Tijuana sowed fear in Southern California on Friday as Mexican prosecutors tried to determine whether the youths were involved in the country’s violent drug trade or innocent victims of a brutal crime.
Federal Reserve notes ag credit tightened across the Midwest
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B4
Agricultural credit conditions tightened in the Midwest during the first quarter of this year, The Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City said Friday. The Federal Reserve reported that its quarterly survey found that the percentage of lenders raising collateral requirements reached another record high in the Tenth Federal Reserve District. The rate of loan repayments also fell for the second straight quarter.
‘Crazy Dress Day’ promotes understanding of classmate’s disease
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B5
The fashion police likely would have been handing out citations right and left Friday at McLouth Elementary School. It was Crazy Dress Day, and students dressed as wackily as they could. Some wore wigs; others clothes that didn’t match. One student even wore underwear on his head for the occasion.
Steady prices a measure of recovery
May 16, 2009 in print edition on B4
More evidence emerged Friday that the recession is easing, with output by the nation’s factories, mines and utilities falling at the slowest pace in six months. At least one area of the economy is flat, but that’s welcome news. Consumer prices were level in April after a slight dip the prior month.
Judge rules teen must see cancer doctor
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A5
Daniel Hauser doesn’t think he’s sick, and he thinks chemotherapy will kill him. The 13-year-old with Hodgkin’s lymphoma told a judge he got so ill he couldn’t walk the one time he got the treatment. “I’d fight it if I had to take it again,” Daniel said, according to a transcript of his court testimony. “I’d punch them and I’d kick them.”
Democrats, Pelosi at risk focusing on torture
May 16, 2009 in print edition on A5
Barack Obama warned Democrats in Congress against making a partisan cause out of the Bush administration’s harsh interrogation tactics. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is ignoring him — loudly — and the party, from the president on down, may pay the price. So far, it’s Pelosi who’s suffered the greatest harm.
Spike Lee trails ‘Kobe Doin’ Work’
May 16, 2009 in print edition on D7
More than any other TV event, basketball accentuates action over reflection. Filmmaker Spike Lee changes the tempo with his film “Kobe Doin’ Work” (7 p.m., today, ESPN). Lee assembled 30 cameras to follow Los Angeles Laker star Kobe Bryant as he prepares for and plays in a crucial game against the San Antonio Spurs on April 13, 2008.