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Letters to the Editor

Bad change

June 20, 2009

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To the editor:

I would like to ask Rick Baker a few questions after his attack (Public Forum, June 6) on Mr. Simons’ May 23 Saturday Column. The United States has the greatest health care system in the world. How much is socialized medicine going to cost and how are they going to pay for it? We don’t have a health care crisis; we have an illegal alien crisis. The health care crisis has been manufactured.

Obama has already shown us that he is soft on terrorism, and now he is wanting to cut over a billion dollars from the missile defense. I bet North Korea will love that. How did Bush allow 9/11 to happen? Why did Bill Clinton let bin Laden go? Shouldn’t you be blaming Bill Clinton? Obama has doubled the deficit in four months that it has taken 232 years to accumulate and it will quadruple in 10 years.

Are you comfortable with tax cheats running the federal government? Do you like high taxes? Who can spend your money better, Mr. Baker, you or the federal government? At what point are the Democrats going to stop blaming Bush and start taking responsibility?

Finally, may I remind you change just for the sake of change is not progress. Not all changes are good, especially when they change the foundation that America was built on.

Comments

jonas_opines 5 years, 6 months ago

Wow, this dude's all over the place. Calm down and focus!

Richard Heckler 5 years, 6 months ago

National Health Insurance will pay the private health care people.

IF the plans on the table are to include the insurance companies of course they will need to increase taxes. Why?

Because of the USA insurance industry Americans spend more than anyone else in the world on health care.

Each health insurer adds its bureaucracy, profits, high corporate salaries, advertising,SHAREHOLDERS and sales commissions to the actual cost of providing care.

Not only is this money lost to health care, but it pays for a system that often makes it more difficult and complicated to receive the care we’ve already paid for.

Shareholders are the primary clients of for-profit insurance companies, not patients.

Moreover, households’ actual costs as a percentage of their incomes are far higher today than most imagine.

Even families with no health insurance contribute substantially to our health care system through taxes.

Recognizing these hidden costs that U.S. households pay for health care today makes it far easier to see how a universal single-payer system—with all of its obvious advantages—can cost Americans less than the one we have today.

The U.S. health care system is typically characterized as a largely private-sector system, so it may come as a surprise that more than 60% of the $2 trillion annual U.S. health care bill is paid through taxes which comes to $1.2 trillion. $1.2 trillion is a sweet gravy train for the insurance industry.

http://www.dollarsandsense.org/archives/2008/0508harrison.html

That same $1.2 trillion can cover all americans. Now this is the real surprise. So the government is not using our tax dollars effiiciently which is to say WE need OUR tax dollars applied in a true fiscally responsible manner.

THERE IS NO NEED TO RAISE TAXES BECAUSE NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE REDUCES THE COST THEREBY MAKING THE EXISTING $1.2 TRILLION MORE THAN ADEQUATE( not yelling just making a point).

If more dollars are necessary there is no reason to continue subsidizing wealthy USA corporations. It is time to cut this group off welfare. Use OUR tax dollars to cover OUR medical insurance in order to pay the private health care people which in essence will increase profits and create more jobs within that industry without the need to raise taxes.

Richard Heckler 5 years, 6 months ago

We have some dishonest politicians aka shareholders leading the charge against fiscally responsible medical insurance.

Tom Dashle condsidering his investments according to news sources. These stockholding legislators actually add to the cost of health care.

Paying More, Getting Less How much is the sick U.S. health care system costing you? http://www.dollarsandsense.org/archives/2008/0508harrison.html

Each of 1,500 health insurer adds its bureaucracy, profits, high corporate salaries, advertising, SHAREHOLDERS and sales commissions to the actual cost of providing care. Not only is this money lost to health care, but it pays for a system that often makes it more difficult and complicated to receive the care we’ve already paid for.

Shareholders are the primary clients of for-profit insurance companies, not patients. Who are the shareholders AND those receiving health insurance courtesy of OUR tax dollars? OUR elected officials in Washington D.C.

Report: The Washington Post has revealed almost thirty key lawmakers helping draft landmark healthcare legislation have financial holdings in the industry, totaling nearly $11 million worth of personal investments.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid has at least $50,000 invested in a healthcare index.

Republican Sen. Judd Gregg, a senior member of the health committee, has up to $560,000 worth of stock holdings in major healthcare companies, including Bristol-Myers Squibb and Merck.

The family of Democratic Congresswoman Jane Harman held at least $3.2 million in more than twenty healthcare companies at the end of last year.

On Tuesday, the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee plans to hold a key hearing to discuss healthcare reform.

On that twenty-two-member panel, at least eight senators have financial interests in the healthcare industry.

The investors include Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-Ga.), a senior member of the panel, who holds at least $165,000 in pharmaceutical and medical stocks, and freshman Sen. Kay Hagan (D-N.C.), who holds at least $180,000 in investments in more than 20 health-care companies.

The hearings will be led by Democratic Senator Christopher Dodd, whose wife serves on the boards of four healthcare companies. She received more than $200,000 in salary and stock from her service last year.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/06/12/AR2009061204075.html

jaywalker 5 years, 6 months ago

Mr. Roper, I get where you're comin' from, but your letter comes off like you need to take a breath, count to ten, and maybe pass out.

And have you seen Jack or Crissie?

Jonathan Becker 5 years, 6 months ago

Mr. Roper asserts America was built on its health care system?????????? I got to get me one his history books. I so look forward to my brand new set of wooden teeth and when will the WalMart on 6th start selling leeches at the pharmacy?

Take a chill pill.

Kookamooka 5 years, 6 months ago

This guy has "ditto head" written all over his face. He has been annointed with Rush Limbaugh's mark of the beast.

Richard Heckler 5 years, 6 months ago

Try this food for thought instead of always believing the legislators who own stocks in the med insurance industry that which are partially responsible for increasing the cost.

These legislators also have top of the line medical insurance courtesy of OUR tax dollars. Plus part of the $1.2 trillion medical insurance tax dollars comes back to legislators as dividends on the their investment. What cha think about the system now.

Food for thought:

Paying through the Taxman

According to a Harvard study the U.S. health care system is typically characterized as a largely private-sector system, so it may come as a surprise that more than 60% of the $2 trillion annual U.S. health care bill is paid through taxes, according to a 2002 analysis published in Health Affairs by Harvard Medical School associate professors Steffie Woolhandler and David Himmelstein.

Tax dollars pay for Medicare and Medicaid, for the Veterans Administration and the Indian Health Service.

Tax dollars pay for health coverage for federal, state, and municipal government employees and their families, as well as for many employees of private companies working on government contracts.

Less visible but no less important, the tax deduction for employer-paid health insurance, along with other health care-related tax deductions, also represents a form of government spending on health care.

It makes little difference whether the government gives taxpayers (or their employers) a deduction for their health care spending, on the one hand, or collects their taxes then pays for their health care, either directly or via a voucher, on the other.

Moreover, tax dollars also pay for critical elements of the health care system apart from direct care—Medicare funds much of the expensive equipment hospitals use, for instance, along with all medical residencies.

All told, then, tax dollars already pay for at least $1.2 trillion in annual U.S. health care expenses. Since federal, state, and local governments collected approximately $3.5 trillion in taxes of all kinds—income, sales, property, corporate—in 2006, that means that more than one third of the aggregate tax revenues collected in the United States that year went to pay for health care.

REMOVE the bureaucracy of 1,500 insurance policies, profits, high corporate salaries, advertising,SHAREHOLDERS and sales commissions... bingo that $1.2 trillion is enough to pay for all US. Finally OUR tax dollars will be spent on US. That means MORE EXPENDABLE CASH out of each paycheck for every home.... not a bad deal.

Richard Heckler 5 years, 6 months ago

If I were invested in the medical insurance industry I would sell and move that money elsewhere.

Why wait?

This is going to be a hot potato and all those corrupt democrat and republican stockholders may not be able to hold back the huge public demand for Nat't Health Insurance.

Don't be a fool. Those legislators will know before YOU do and will sell off. Yes they will leave all other stockholders holding the losing money bag.

If one CANNOT AFFORD to lose money why take the chance. If one can afford to lose money it would seem foolish to lose when it's not necessary.

BrianR 5 years, 6 months ago

Darren Roper lies: "The United States has the greatest health care system in the world."

Ok, you lost me right there. No need to read any further.

JHOK32 5 years, 6 months ago

Yes, Clinton was secretly in the Whitehouse as President on 911, so he is definetly to blame.....it is true that Clinton had a shot at Obama & didn't take it, however, any terrorist with half a brain could have pulled off 911 at the time. We've only been having plane hi-jackings since the 1970's.....that was apparently too hard for the Bush adminstration's CIA, FBI, ATF, NSF, etc, etc, to figure out.

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