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Archive for Monday, January 7, 2008

Parents get reprieve on children’s allergies

January 7, 2008


— Breast-feeding helps prevent babies' allergies, but there's no good evidence for avoiding certain foods during pregnancy, using soy formula or delaying introduction of solid foods beyond six months.

That's the word from the American Academy of Pediatrics, which is updating earlier suggestions that may have made some parents feel like they weren't doing enough to prevent food allergies, asthma and allergic rashes.

In August 2000, the doctors group advised mothers of infants with a family history of allergies to avoid cow's milk, eggs, fish, peanuts and tree nuts while breast-feeding.

That advice, along with a recommended schedule for introducing certain risky foods, left some moms and dads blaming themselves if their children went on to develop allergies.

"They say, 'I shouldn't have had milk in my coffee,"' said Dr. Scott Sicherer of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine's Jaffe Food Allergy Institute in New York. "I've been saying, 'We don't really have evidence that it causes a problem. Don't be on a guilt trip about it."'

Sicherer helped write the new guidance report for pediatricians, published in the January issue of the journal Pediatrics. Earlier advice about restricting certain foods from moms' and babies' diets has been tossed out and the only surefire advice remaining is to breast-feed.

The report says:

¢ There is no convincing evidence that women who avoid peanuts or other foods during pregnancy or breast-feeding lower their child's risk of allergies.

¢ For infants with a family history of allergies, exclusive breast-feeding for at least four months can lessen the risk of rashes and allergy to cow's milk.

¢ Exclusive breast-feeding for at least three months protects against wheezing in babies, but whether it prevents asthma in older children is unclear.

¢ There is modest evidence for feeding hypoallergenic formulas to susceptible babies if they are not solely breast-fed.

¢ There is no good evidence that soy-based formulas prevent allergies.

¢ There is no convincing evidence that delaying the introduction of foods such as eggs, fish or peanut butter to children prevents allergies. Babies should not get solid food before 4 to 6 months of age, however.

The evidence for the earlier recommendations was weak and hasn't been strengthened by new research, Sicherer said.

"You never know what's going to come around the corner, but in the past seven years there hasn't been enough evidence to support the old recommendations," Sicherer said.


blackwalnut 7 years, 10 months ago

I can verify that a breastfeeding infant can react - with eczema and hives - to foods the breastfeeding mother eats. We had many problems like this in our family when our children were babies.

My family is a very allergic family - on both sides of the family true. This is undoubtedly not a problem for the majority of families. But if the AAP is suddenly reversing its position and claiming that it is never true for any family, they are simply flat-out wrong.

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