Archive for Saturday, February 16, 2008

Study: Lack of proper vehicles for roadside bombs cost lives

February 16, 2008

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A Category I mine-resistant ambush-protected (MRAP) vehicle, is driven on a test course during a media demonstration at the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland in this Aug. 24, 2007, file photo. An internal military study concluded that hundreds of Marine lives could have been saved from road bombs in Iraq if bureaucrats had not refused a 2005 request for blast-resistant vehicles.

A Category I mine-resistant ambush-protected (MRAP) vehicle, is driven on a test course during a media demonstration at the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland in this Aug. 24, 2007, file photo. An internal military study concluded that hundreds of Marine lives could have been saved from road bombs in Iraq if bureaucrats had not refused a 2005 request for blast-resistant vehicles.

— Hundreds of U.S. Marines have been killed or injured by roadside bombs in Iraq because Marine Corps bureaucrats refused an urgent request in 2005 from battlefield commanders for blast-resistant vehicles, an internal military study concludes.

The study, written by a civilian Marine Corps official and obtained by The Associated Press, accuses the service of "gross mismanagement" that delayed deliveries of the mine-resistant, ambush-protected trucks for more than two years.

Cost was a driving factor in the decision to turn down the request for the so-called MRAPs, according to the study. Stateside authorities saw the hulking vehicles, which can cost as much as a $1 million each, as a financial threat to programs aimed at developing lighter vehicles that were years from being fielded.

After Defense Secretary Robert Gates declared the MRAP (pronounced M-rap) the Pentagon's No. 1 acquisition priority in May 2007, the trucks began to be shipped to Iraq in large quantities.

The vehicles weigh as much as 40 tons and have been effective at protecting American forces from improvised explosive devices (IEDs), the weapon of choice for Iraqi insurgents. Only four U.S. troops have been killed by such bombs while riding in MRAPs; three of those deaths occurred in older versions of the vehicles.

The study's author, Franz J. Gayl, catalogs what he says were flawed decisions and missteps by midlevel managers in Marine Corps offices that occurred well before Gates replaced Donald Rumsfeld in December 2006.

Among the findings in the Jan. 22 study:

¢ Budget and procurement managers failed to recognize the damage being done by IEDs in late 2004 and early 2005 and were convinced the best solution was adding more armor to the less-sturdy Humvees the Marines were using. Humvees, even those with extra layers of steel, proved incapable of blunting the increasingly powerful explosives planted by insurgents.

¢ An urgent February 2005 request for MRAPs got lost in bureaucracy. It was signed by then-Brig. Gen. Dennis Hejlik, who asked for 1,169 of the vehicles. The Marines could not continue to take "serious and grave casualties" caused by IEDs when a solution was commercially available, wrote Hejlik, who was a commander in western Iraq from June 2004 to February 2005.

¢ The Marine Corps' acquisition staff didn't give top leaders correct information. Gen. James Conway, the Marine Corps commandant, was not told of the gravity of Hejlik's MRAP request and the real reasons it was shelved, Gayl writes. That resulted in Conway giving "inaccurate and incomplete" information to Congress about why buying MRAPs was not hotly pursued.

An inquiry should be conducted by the Marine Corps inspector general to determine if any military or government employees are culpable for failing to rush critical gear to the troops, recommends Gayl, who prepared the study for the Marine Corps' plans, policies and operations department.

Comments

Ragingbear 7 years, 2 months ago

Hmm.. Why is it that so many elements of this Iraq thing seem like Vietnam? Let's make a list.

It's not a declared war. Neither was Vietnam.

Soldiers that served there were disrespected, despite being in the military before the fiasco began.

It has the country divided.

Nobody really knows why we are still over there.

Returning vets got lousy medical and mental care, resulting in a virtual plague of homeless, mentally ill vets.

Our troops are under equipped, under trained, and under supplied.

All we need now is a bunch of bamboo cages and some tunnel rats.

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