Archive for Thursday, May 17, 2007

Pickup truck jumps curb near downtown

Cause undetermined

May 17, 2007

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At about 8 a.m. today a pickup truck traveling east on Ninth Street between Kentucky and Vermont streets jumped the curb and ended up on top of a short brick fence

At about 8 a.m. today a pickup truck traveling east on Ninth Street between Kentucky and Vermont streets jumped the curb and ended up on top of a short brick fence

At about 8 a.m. today a pickup truck traveling east on Ninth Street between Kentucky and Vermont streets jumped the curb and ended up on top of a short brick fence. It is undetermined at this point what caused the accident.

Comments

FatTony 8 years, 3 months ago

My guess was he thought he was coming up to a round a bout

Jackson 8 years, 3 months ago

The fence was built to protect the building, and is usually hit by cars traveling south on Tennessee.

OfficeGirl 8 years, 3 months ago

FatTony: Right on. I finally stopped laughing. I hate them too but will mostly just sit there waiting for the "safe" moment to enter, which can = never. I especially hate the one at 19th & Barker at the end of the work day. Those folks heading east do not give an inch. Where does one read the rules on driving through and yielding at roundabouts? They didn't teach that back in the day when I took driver's ed.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 8 years, 3 months ago

"Where does one read the rules on driving through and yielding at roundabouts? They didn't teach that back in the day when I took driver's ed."

It's your (and other's) not knowing or heeding the rules that is the problem.

The rule is quite simple-- it's a yield sign. Look to your left (what's to your right won't matter until you've entered) and if you can enter the intersection without causing a collision, or near collision, then do so. Once you're in the roundabout, anyone to your right has to yield to you.

BTW, the one at 19th and Barker is probably the best designed and built one in town, and when everyone using it knows and follows the rules, traffic flows through 2-3 times as fast and smoothly as any of 4-way stops up the way on Barker.

OfficeGirl 8 years, 3 months ago

Bozo, if you read my post, that's what I do. I just wasn't sure exactly how it was supposed to work. I don't really care if my handling of a roundabout is a problem or not. It shouldn't be as I will err on the side of caution always. I don't drive with a cellphone jammed up my a$$ or any of the other stupid things I see people do that cause inattentativeness--just posed a question because I truly was interested in the answer. They didn't teach that in driver's ed and no instructions are at the intersections that have roundabouts. I still don't like them as yielding can be a forever thing especially if you are a cautious driver as I am. I like my insurance rates.

bearded_gnome 8 years, 3 months ago

okay officegirl, now from bozoonthewrongbus you've experienced the liberal version of blame-the-victim...of course your problem with the roundy is your fault! the benevolent citizens' committee will decide all things and will tell you how to drive with new thought, and if you don't measure up, it is your fault, you are failing to live up to the social standard...if you keep this up, the benevolent citizens co committee will decide to delete you from the system to prevent social discomfort.

be aware.

Leprechaunking13 8 years, 3 months ago

Or it had nothing to do with cell phones or round-a-bouts and ya'll just want to b*tch about them

Bradley Kemp 8 years, 3 months ago

Sigh.

Bozo is right, Office Girl (and Gnome). There are no special "rules" about how to handle a roundabout. If you know what a yield sign means, you know how to use a roundabout. And it's one thing to be a defensive driver, Office Girl, and yet another to obstruct traffic at a roundabout (or anywhere else) because you're being overcautious. This is why there are minimum speed limits on the interstate highways. Overcautious drivers can be a danger.

When you reach the threshold of a roundabout, enter the intersection if you can do so safely. Don't wait until you can do so more safely than safely.

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