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Archive for Wednesday, January 31, 2007

Notable project

January 31, 2007

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To the editor:

At a time when we are faced with the specter of global warming, when electricity costs are climbing and when we have heavily polluting coal plants being proposed in Kansas, the importance of the Southwest Junior High School solar project cannot be exaggerated.

Far more important than how many horribly inefficient incandescent lights could be powered by the 1.2 kilowatt photovoltaic system being installed by grants upon the school is the statement this system makes to our children that we are trying to find ways to lighten our environmental burden that we bequeath them. This solar project will show how even a small system is a start to making a change for the better.

Over the 40-year life of the system it will produce more than 73 million watt hours of electricity, thus keeping nearly 600 pounds of sulfur dioxide, 360 pounds of nitrogen oxide and more than 108,000 pounds of carbon dioxide out of our air.

Kansas, though rich in sustainable energy sources, has lagged behind the nation in implementing and encouraging these alternatives, largely due to our residents having a lack of exposure and education to the benefits. Our community is lucky to have the project at Southwest that will offer a start to this educational process. The time has come when we all must think more about the consequences of our energy addiction and do more to conserve energy and produce clean, sustainable energy.

Aron Cromwell,

Lawrence

Comments

imastinker 7 years, 12 months ago

1200 watts? Are you serious? How much does this cost? That won't even run my refrigerator - or the lights in my house (small house).

Does this teach kids something? What's the advantage to doing it? It sounds expensive.

Richard Heckler 7 years, 12 months ago

Cutting back on energy use is a primary key to our situation and they will take this home with them. Perhaps turning off lights,computers and stereos will make more sense to them at the end of the day. This project deserves applause.

Young students need projects with substance for it breaks the boredom. One day they will be home owners which means they will understand more about energy consumption and generation. They will also understand how including solar generation at the time of construction is far more practical that retrofitting.

imastinker 7 years, 12 months ago

There are so many better ways to do this though. Wind power is something they can make in class - and will provide more power than this. Are they just installing it on the roof and forgetting it?

Switching to flourescents will save much more power than this. I put 36 lights in my basement workshop - and used screw in flourescent bulbs. This was a savings of over 1500 watts, and about 15 cents for every hour they are in use. This is the way to push this technology.

I didn't read the article - but I know solar power is expensive. I fear this will be another way for the district to spend money without teaching kids anything.

EileenM SmithMArch 7 years, 11 months ago

1.2 kWp Building-Integrated Photovoltaic [BI-PV] solar electricity is a great endeavor for South Junior High. We urge students and parents to file official support for two-year moratorium on new coal-fired plants in KS to reduce mercury emissions. I am concerned about LJW article characterizing 1.2 kWp solar for South Jr. High as electricity source to light 100 watt lightbulb for 24 hours. This misrepresents many benefits of solar electricity. Please visit website for Kansas Solar Electric Co~operatives [K-SEC] and download our Feb. 2007 Building-Integrated Photovoltaics [BI-PV] N.E.W.S.Letter. www.geocities.com/Solar_Electric_Coop... http://www.geocities.com/ks_sec_2006/K_SEC_NEWS_FEB07.pdf

1.2 kWp in Kansas we have 5 sun hours a day to generate 3 kWh saving 30 cents a day 250 days year = $75 from their electric bill.
Compare cost of 1.2 kWp peak system at SW Junior High for $18,000 with cost of 3 kWp solar array installed on Quinter Library in 2003 for $18,000. It provides 15 kWh a day 250 days a year. It is twice as large and cost the same -why? With assistance from Jim Plougher at Kansas Corporation Commission [KCC] Quinter Library was awarded $10,000 grant. They paid $9,000 or $3 watt -what commercial photovoltaic systems would cost were they not suppressed.
K-SEC renewable cooperatives will not sell solar systems but install them at $2 watt with no cost to consumers. K-SEC will install, monitor, maintain and manage wholesale building-integrated photovoltaic [BI-PV] solar electricity commerce. 1.2 kWp for $18,000 is extremely extorted rate of $15 watt peak installed. Mr. Cromwell informed me several years ago most of solar systems he installs are manufactured by BP Amoco. They have taken over 70% of photovoltaic manufacturing worldwide since 1984 when Amoco Oil took over Solarex Corporation. That year the 30,000 SF BI-PV rooftop was installed on the Intercultural Center at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. Every year it generates $57,000 of demand-site fuel-free non-polluting renewable solar electricity in our nation's capital. It is featured on the cover of my book "ElectriCity BEYOND THE CURVE OF DEREGULATION". Copies of 836-page CD PDF book are available locally at Raven Bookstore and Local Burger for $21. Read forward on website listed here. Proceeds support K-SEC 1,000 MWp BI-PV Solar in Kansas by 2016 Program. www.geocities.com/EthosOfCommerce
Hey, parents and students at South Jr. High could form a K-SEC renewable cooperative via KS House Bill 2018 and install another 1.2 kWp solar system or 100 SF to compare notes on how experience is different. K-SEC is planning to begin installations Fall 2008 ---but WE NEED EVERYONE'S HELP TO ACCOMPLISH THIS GOAL! Please e-mail us rooftops with 100 to 50,000 SF unshaded south, southwest or flat facing surface. Send to: Solar_Cooperatives@yahoo.com
/> See form on Feb 2007 K-SEC BI-PV N.E.W.S Letter

EileenM SmithMArch 7 years, 11 months ago

1.2 kWp Building-Integrated Photovoltaic [BI-PV] solar electricity is a great endeavor for South Junior High. I am concerned about LJW article characterizing 1.2 kWp solar for South Jr. High as electricity source to light 100 watt lightbulb for 24 hours. This misrepresents many benefits of solar electricity. Please visit website for Kansas Solar Electric Co~operatives [K-SEC] and download our Feb. 2007 Building-Integrated Photovoltaics [BI-PV] N.E.W.S.Letter. www.geocities.com/Solar_Electric_Coop... http://www.geocities.com/ks_sec_2006/K_SEC_NEWS_FEB07.pdf

1.2 kWp in Kansas we have 5 sun hours a day to generate 3 kWh saving 30 cents a day 250 days year = $75 from their electric bill.
Compare cost of 1.2 kWp peak system at SW Junior High for $18,000 with cost of 3 kWp solar array installed on Quinter Library in 2003 for $18,000. It provides 15 kWh a day 250 days a year. It is twice as large and cost the same -why? With assistance from Jim Plougher at Kansas Corporation Commission [KCC] Quinter Library was awarded $10,000 grant. They paid $9,000 or $3 watt -what commercial photovoltaic systems would cost were they not suppressed.
K-SEC renewable cooperatives will not sell solar systems but install them at $2 watt with no cost to consumers. K-SEC will install, monitor, maintain and manage wholesale building-integrated photovoltaic [BI-PV] solar electricity commerce. 1.2 kWp for $18,000 is extremely extorted rate of $15 watt peak installed. Mr. Cromwell informed me several years ago most of solar systems he installs are manufactured by BP Amoco. They have taken over 70% of photovoltaic manufacturing worldwide since 1984 when Amoco Oil took over Solarex Corporation. That year the 30,000 SF BI-PV rooftop was installed on the Intercultural Center at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. Every year it generates $57,000 of demand-site fuel-free non-polluting renewable solar electricity in our nation's capital. It is featured on the cover of my book "ElectriCity BEYOND THE CURVE OF DEREGULATION". Copies of 836-page CD PDF book are available locally at Raven Bookstore and Local Burger for $21. Read forward on website listed here. Proceeds support K-SEC 1,000 MWp BI-PV Solar in Kansas by 2016 Program. www.geocities.com/EthosOfCommerce
Hey, parents and students at South Jr. High could form a K-SEC renewable cooperative via KS House Bill 2018 and install another 1.2 kWp solar system or 100 SF to compare notes on how experience is different. K-SEC is planning to begin installations Fall 2008 ---but WE NEED EVERYONE'S HELP TO ACCOMPLISH THIS GOAL! Please e-mail us rooftops with 100 to 50,000 SF unshaded south, southwest or flat facing surface. Send to: Solar_Cooperatives@yahoo.com
/> See form on Feb 2007 K-SEC BI-PV N.E.W.S Letter

Eileen M. Smith, M.Arch. Founder & Director Kansas Solar Electric Co~operatives [K-SEC] PO Box 2 Lawrence, Kansa 66044

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