Archive for Tuesday, March 28, 2006

Bob Dole’s old running mate ponders Republican strategies

March 28, 2006

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Jack Kemp addresses media members gathered at the Dole Institute of Politics Monday afternoon.

Jack Kemp addresses media members gathered at the Dole Institute of Politics Monday afternoon.

Republicans nationwide need to expand their base if they hope to remain in control in the Capitol and the White House, Bob Dole's former running mate said Monday.

Jack Kemp, who ran with Dole during his 1996 presidential bid, said the GOP needed to take cues from both the current illegal immigration debate and the racial and social implications of Hurricane Katrina to reach out to people whom he said the party often isolated.

"What a monstrosity," Kemp said of the Republicans' immigration policy. "What an embarrassment."

Kemp was at Kansas University Monday, speaking at the annual Vickers Memorial Lecture Series presented by the KU School of Business.

But before he spoke to a Lied Center audience, he spoke to a smaller audience just before touring the Dole Institute of Politics.

Although border control is a priority in a post 9-11 world, Kemp said at the Institute, the people the party has isolated often pay into the system and embody the history of America as a place for people to succeed.

"It's one thing to protect our borders," Kemp said. "It's another thing to criminalize people that are working here and paying taxes."

But Kemp still predicted many Republicans would hold onto their House and Senate seats, if only from lack of a real Democratic strategy.

Iraq will certainly weigh heavily on the minds of voters, he said. His criticism of the war on terror would set the tone for his later speech at the Lied Center: The economics have to add up to work toward a democratic, capitalist world.

"We all support the war on terror," he said. "But it doesn't have an economic end."

Economic ends have occupied Kemp's thoughts recently. He's been reading Tom Friedman's "The World Is Flat" for two weeks and can see America must strive toward globalization, rather than fight against it.

In his political days, Kemp said, he considered himself a hawk, a hardliner that stood by Reagan-era conservatism. Now, however, he sees himself as a dove, ready to bring politicians together to help his vision of economic freedom.

Jack Kemp, former vice-presidential running mate to Bob Dole in the 1996 bid speaks Monday afternoon at the Dole Institute of Politics with Wichita resident Susan Vickers who&squot;s family started the J.A. Vickers, Sr. and Robert F. Vickers, Sr. Memorial Lecture Series in 1971. Kemp was featured Monday evening as the guest lecturer for the series at the Lied Center where he presented his lecture "America&squot;s Global Leadership Imperative."

Jack Kemp, former vice-presidential running mate to Bob Dole in the 1996 bid speaks Monday afternoon at the Dole Institute of Politics with Wichita resident Susan Vickers who's family started the J.A. Vickers, Sr. and Robert F. Vickers, Sr. Memorial Lecture Series in 1971. Kemp was featured Monday evening as the guest lecturer for the series at the Lied Center where he presented his lecture "America's Global Leadership Imperative."

Most of Kemp's work since his political days has been in the private sector. He's formed two nonpartisan Washington think tanks - Empower America and Foundation for the Defense of Democracies - and has served on the boards of several businesses, including the banking and real estate firm FreeMarket Global Limited, which he co-founded in 2003.

But Kemp said he was still a statesman, and at the Lied Center Monday night he again took issue with the proposed immigration law.

He equated the law to an attack on the capitalist, democratic America that all citizens immigrated here for at one point in the country's history.

After all, he said, America was built by immigrant labor. To turn people away now would be closing the door on the American dream for many.

"Immigrants," he said, "are ubiquitous."

Comments

craigers 10 years, 5 months ago

Why can't these immigrants come into the United States with a work visa and then become citizens the old fashioned way instead of having to come work illegally. I don't think people really have a problem with immigrants that come to the US and work, pay taxes and contribute. I think they have a problem with the ones that come and work for cash, don't contribute and then find ways to get on welfare. I personally am glad there are immigrants in this country since we all came here at some point, and some of the immigrants are the hardest working individuals I've seen. Simply because they want a better life and try to earn it and will take any job because it is employment. Some of our unemployed work force should put aside their ego and take a job that they think is "beneath" them.

just_another_bozo_on_this_bus 10 years, 5 months ago

"I think they have a problem with the ones that come and work for cash, don't contribute and then find ways to get on welfare."

Do you really believe that there are many so many immigrants who do this?

craigers 10 years, 5 months ago

I never said there were many. But as we all know what they are doing is focusing on the small group that does and exploit that to get their legislation passed. Do you agree?

staff04 10 years, 5 months ago

The Senate took some real steps yesterday towards getting this thing sorted out...

For a change, I actually feel somewhat positive about what Congress is doing.

Jamesaust 10 years, 5 months ago

"Why can't these immigrants come into the United States with a work visa and then become citizens the old fashioned way instead of having to come work illegally[?]"

They can if the U.S. would issue the work visas sufficient to cover demand. But some get queasy at the thought of 10-20 million foreignors - most Latin, not Scandanavian - so they cut back on the numbers of visas or restrict them to the point they are of lesser value (no permanent right to stay, no legal protections, etc.).

Strangely enough, if all jobs were filled with documentable U.S. citizens and 'green card' aliens, there'd be no jobs for those trying to find work outside of the system and it would be easier to spot employers trying to game the system.

kansas_prairieland 10 years, 5 months ago

What's up with Jack Kemp's hair?

For years now, it has looked exactly the same (only now it's a lot grayer).

I wish he'd change his hairstyle!

yourworstnightmare 10 years, 5 months ago

The same thing Bob Dole thinks when he visits the Clinton Presidential Library.

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