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Archive for Monday, February 11, 2002

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World Online report: Kansas wins overtime thriller, 110-103
February 11, 2002
(Web Posted Monday at 10:46 p.m.) Two Kansas freshmen got a little older on the road. With Drew Gooden in foul trouble for most of the night, Wayne Simien and Aaron Miles stepped up and turned in performances that would look good on a graduating senior.
U.S. probes allegations prisoners taken in raid were beaten
February 11, 2002
(Web Posted Monday at 4:33 p.m.) The Pentagon’s military spokesman on the Afghan war on Monday defended a CIA missile strike last week that killed an unknown number of individuals, saying they “were not innocents” and that “something untoward” was going on at the time of the attack.
6News video: Sebelius turns down Anthem-Blue Cross merger
February 11, 2002
(Updated Monday at 3:53 p.m.) Kansas Insurance Commissioner Kathleen Sebelius explains at a press conference Monday why she denied the merger between Anthem and Blue Cross-Blue Shield of Kansas.
Sebelius rejects Anthem takeover of Blue Cross-Blue Shield of Kansas
February 11, 2002
(Updated Monday at 11:33 a.m.) Insurance Commissioner Kathleen Sebelius on Monday rejected the proposed acquisition of the state’s largest health insurance company by an Indiana firm.
Red Crescent Society graduates female health care volunteers
U.S. spokesman calls drone investigation ‘successful’
February 11, 2002
(Web Posted Monday at 7:01 a.m.) Fifty-nine women graduated Monday from a health care course offered by the Afghan Red Crescent Society a significant step for a nation where women had been banned from education under the radical Taliban regime and where medical care is sorely deficient.
Cardinal won’t step down amid sex abuse scandal
February 11, 2002
A confident Cardinal Bernard Law was interrupted by applause Sunday when he vowed he would not step down despite increasing pressure from a child sex abuse scandal.
Study examines death penalty cases overturned on appeal
February 11, 2002
When jurors choose a death sentence in cases that are not among the “worst of the worst,” the sentence is more likely to be overturned on appeal, a study spanning 23 years of court records found.
Events erode Daytona Beach coffers
Popular springtime destination considers pay-as-you-go policy
February 11, 2002
The smell of high-octane gas and the buzz of cars whizzing around a racetrack are in the air. The traffic is thickening on International Speedway Boulevard, this city’s main thoroughfare.
Lack of funds limits shelter’s aid
February 11, 2002
By Dave Ranney In Lawrence, when police respond to a domestic violence call, the abuser often spends the night in jail. The victim almost always a woman stays put. If she wants help, she’s encouraged to call Women’s Transitional Care Services.
Mission possible: Service makes home ownership a reality
February 11, 2002
By Mindie Paget Todd Ford and his young daughter, Cami Jo, had lived for eight years in a tiny apartment. There was so little room, Ford said, that it was hard for Cami Jo to have friends stay the night.
KU researchers examine antibiotics’ effects on environment
February 11, 2002
By Terry Rombeck Last year’s anthrax scare put the spotlight on Cipro, the antibiotic used to treat the germ. But a group of Kansas University researchers already were working to learn more about Cipro and other antibiotics like it. Specifically, the researchers want to learn what effect the antibiotics have when they pass through the body and reach waterways.
NBA ALL-Star Game: Bryant powers West squad to 15-point rout
February 11, 2002
The booing began when Kobe Bryant was introduced, continued after he made a series of game-turning plays and reached a crescendo when he was handed the All-Star MVP trophy. Back in his hometown where the fans show him no love, Bryant received none Sunday. Instead, he was practically treated like a traitor by the notoriously harsh Philadelphia fans.
Elevate the SLT
February 11, 2002
Books reveal intolerance
February 11, 2002
It’s hard to imagine that two such dissimilar characters as Pat Buchanan and Alan Dershowitz could have in common an authoritarian streak as wide as the New Jersey Turnpike.
Milosevic’s trial threatens all Serbs
February 11, 2002
Barely 2 miles from the apartment houses that mark the northwest limits of this capital lies a training compound for elite police forces where last summer workers unearthed the bodies of scores of ethnic Albanians killed in the province of Kosovo.
Investigator appointed in Irish bank loss
February 11, 2002
Allied Irish Banks PLC appointed a senior American banker Sunday to oversee an internal probe into $750 million in allegedly fraudulent losses at its U.S. subsidiary, Allfirst Bank of Baltimore.
New weapon turning point in warfare
Palestinian rockets may deliver deadly chemical payloads
February 11, 2002
Palestinian militants in the Gaza Strip fired what appeared to be two next-generation rockets into Israel on Sunday, marking a strategic shift in warfare that is likely to heighten fears in Israeli border cities. The rockets, which may have carried up to 22 pounds of explosives, landed harmlessly and were overshadowed by violence in the Negev Desert city of Beersheba, where gunmen linked to the militant Hamas organization killed two Israelis and wounded four others.
Lawmakers target soaring prescription costs
February 11, 2002
By Scott Rothschild Like thousands of Kansans, Shirley Russell’s pharmacy bill is one of her biggest expenses. Sixty-seven-year-old Russell, Lawrence, spends up to $400 a month on prescription medicine for heart problems, diabetes, lung disease and other ills. And she said the cost would be twice as much if her doctor didn’t provide free drug samples.
Federal highway cuts bad news for area projects
February 11, 2002
By Chad Lawhorn President George’s Bush’s proposed budget, including a $9 billion cut in federal highway funding, would force about $60 million worth of reductions to Kansas transportation plans. Typically funding cuts roll down hill. That’s why Douglas County and Lawrence transportation leaders said they were concerned this week about the future of projects here.
Westminster to pay tribute to Sept. 11 rescue dogs
February 11, 2002
Most years, Apollo would never make it to the Westminster dog show. He’s getting a bit gray in the muzzle, his teeth are yellowing, and he’s slowing down. Not at all like the 2,500 perfectly primped pooches at America’s most prestigious canine competition.
Cold Climate’ a mad delight
February 11, 2002
Passion, privilege and good old-fashioned British eccentricity combine to make “Love in a Cold Climate” (8 p.m., PBS) one of the funnier “Masterpiece Theatre” offerings in recent memory. Based on Nancy Mitford’s two novels, “The Pursuit of Love” and “Love in a Cold Climate,” the film follows three young women from the British upper class as they hunt for husbands during the 1930s, while The Great Depression and looming war threaten their very way of life.
Big Fat Liar’ is good, mean fun
February 11, 2002
“Big Fat Liar” is “The Count of Monte Cristo” for middle-schoolers.
Activists urge U.N. to lead relief effort for N. Korea refugees
February 11, 2002
The United Nations should spearhead relief efforts for North Korean refugees in China and Russia, delegates said Sunday on the final day of an international conference on human rights in North Korea.
More food aid needed
February 11, 2002
The U.N. World Food Program said it has received only a fraction of the aid needed to help feed starving North Korea, where at least 2 million young children may die of hunger.
Oil spill cleanup begins off New Zealand coast
February 11, 2002
Workers with shovels and front-end loaders began cleaning tons of oil Sunday from the beaches of a northeastern New Zealand town after salvage teams reduced the flow of the heavy fuel from a stricken cargo ship grounded offshore.
Family event needs help
February 11, 2002
Agency: Families Together Inc.
One dead as illness sweeps convention
February 11, 2002
A mysterious illness killed one woman attending a weekend convention and sent seven others to hospitals, but health officials said Sunday they didn’t think anyone else who didn’t already have symptoms would get sick.
Former Enron chief to take 5th at Senate hearing Tuesday
February 11, 2002
Former Enron chairman Kenneth Lay will assert his right against self-incrimination and refuse to answer questions when he appears before Congress under subpoena this week, his spokeswoman said Sunday night.
Katheryn Ann Sanderson
February 11, 2002
Jordan still maintains magnetism
Mystique never goes away for NBA legend at All-Star Game
February 11, 2002
Michael Jordan didn’t reign supreme at All-Star Weekend. The NBA’s official bobble-head doll, the one everyone took home in his or her free goodie bag, featured a caricature of someone else.
Railroad reform plan took the wrong track
February 11, 2002
With Amtrak’s future at stake, Congress may be finding that its previous attempt to turn the passenger railroad around had unintended consequences.
House expects fight about telemarketing
February 11, 2002
A legislative battle looms over telemarketing.
State-funded study lands lead researcher post on federal panel
Epidemiologist’s findings will assist new VA committee with preventing post-war illnesses
February 11, 2002
Headaches. Fatigue. Joint pain. Muscle pain. Skin rashes. Nausea. Constant diarrhea. Neurological problems.
Sewer improvements assessments under scrutiny
February 11, 2002
Bottom Line Commissioners plan a very short meeting where they will have a hearing on proposed special assessments for sewer improvements on George Williams Way.
Clark claims gold for U.S.
February 11, 2002
OK, snowboarders, maybe the Olympics really are cool, after all. Kelly Clark flew higher and nailed more dangerous tricks than anyone in the halfpipe Sunday to become the first American to take gold at the Salt Lake City Olympics.
Trust me, women’s moguls definitely terror-proof
February 11, 2002
I came here to watch the women’s moguls competition, along with 13,500 spectators, several dozen of whom actually saw the event. The rest will not get through the security system until June at the earliest. There is no way a terrorist could ever make it past the fiendishly clever, multiple-level defenses that have been set up to prevent penetration of the moguls competition. The first line of defense is the Olympic transit system, which is a series of buses you must take to get anywhere, with each bus populated by friendly Utah residents, every one of whom asks you where you’re from.
Stewart captures Shootout
Earnhardt Jr. takes second at Daytona event
February 11, 2002
Rules nearly overshadowed racing Sunday in the Budweiser Shootout.
Fresno State snaps skid
Jackson lifts Bulldogs past OSU, 58-52
February 11, 2002
A minor adjustment in Damon Jackson’s shot made a huge difference for Fresno State.
Evil axis’ sentiment leans primarily toward Iraq
February 11, 2002
Emboldened by success in Afghanistan, some lawmakers are beating the drum for quick action to get rid of Iraq’s Saddam Hussein. They take a different view of other nations singled out by President Bush as trouble. Saddam should be removed, and soon, Democratic Sen. Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut said Sunday. “He is a time bomb.”
Pakistan leader hopes to solidify U.S. ties
February 11, 2002
When he meets with President Bush this week, Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf will be looking for more than a pat on the back for helping the war on terrorism.
Stevens plans to be back in lineup
February 11, 2002
By Steve Rottinghaus Free State High coach Darrell Andrew plans on his senior standout Justin Stevens being available for the Class 6A wrestling regional Saturday at Olathe South. Stevens returned home late Saturday night after sustaining a concussion when he inadvertently butted foreheads with Olathe South’s Justin Dyer in the 189-pound final of the Sunflower League meet earlier Saturday at Olathe North. With his neck in a brace, Stevens was taken away on a stretcher to Olathe Medical Center for X-rays.
Briefly
February 11, 2002
Kidnap case at standstill Officers’ remains recovered Arms-smuggling charges filed Self-proclaimed hostage won’t discuss abduction
SEC offers lesson on scams
February 11, 2002
The Web site for McWhortle Enterprises Inc. is pretty impressive. It has nice graphics, including a picture of its revolutionary product a hand-held device that allows consumers to detect biohazardous materials such as anthrax. According to the company, the “Bio-Hazard Alert Detector” is powered by two AA batteries and emits an audible beep and flashes when in the presence of all known biohazards.
Your Money: A look at wine
February 11, 2002
Karen Bledsoe reports every week on consumer issues. This week’s topic: Wine.
David A. Bennett
February 11, 2002
Services for David A. Bennett, 67, Lawrence, will be 2 p.m. Wednesday at Warren-McElwain Mortuary. Burial will be at Oak Hill Cemetery. Mr. Bennett died Sunday, Feb. 10, 2002, at his home.
Elevate the SLT
February 11, 2002
To the editor: I expressed amazement at the Corps of Engineers’ plan to consult every Native American tribe in the nation on local traffic problems and I got a “history/government lesson” from Mr. Ford for my trouble. No problem! Unlike most of my “Euro-American” friends, I never tire of hearing the old “my ancestors got a crappy deal” story! We should all get used to hearing it, as it promises to be a major theme of the Democratic Party in the next decade.
Federal failure
February 11, 2002
Local briefs
February 11, 2002
 Valentine’s Day: Library sponsors program about favorite teen treat Here’s a quiz: What bean grows in warm, moist climates and has annual world consumption of about 600,000 tons per year? If you’re thinking of coffee, you’d be wrong. It’s the cocoa bean, which area teens celebrated Sunday at the Lawrence Public Library with the third annual Chocolate Program. About 25 people attended the program, where the teens learned the history of chocolate and chocolate facts. And they chowed down on a variety of chocolate products, from white chocolate to unsweetened baking chocolate. Organizer Kim Patton, young adult specialist at the library, said the Chocolate Program was a fun way to celebrate Valentine’s Day without getting too lovey-dovey. _______  Brain Teaser: Hughes quiz, Day 12 This is one in a series of questions to test your knowledge on Langston Hughes, as part of the celebration of his 100th birthday. A new question will appear each day through Feb. 14. Each day’s answer will be posted at langstonhughes.ljworld.com. 12) Why did Langston Hughes’ father move to Mexico? Answer to Sunday’s question: Pinckney, New York and Central schools. _______  Community service: Jefferson County teen-agers help with anti-smoking effort Two area high school students are helping with a statewide anti-tobacco campaign. As members of Teens Against Smoking in Kansas, Ryan Bishop, a Jefferson West High School student, and Chris Dunn, a Perry-Lecompton High School student, are helping to organize three tobacco-resistance activities for youth. The Smoke-Free Teens are Rising Rallies will be in Hays, Wichita and Topeka later this month and in March. The events feature presentations about second-hand smoke, smokeless tobacco and local policy initiatives. Later this month, Bishop and Dunn will be featured as part of TASK’s anti-tobacco television advertisement campaign. The commercials will begin airing on area stations starting Feb. 18. In Jefferson County, Bishop and Dunn help promote the activities through Youth Against Drugs and Alcohol, which is sponsored by the county’s health department.
Local briefs
February 11, 2002
Valentine’s Day: Library sponsors program about favorite teen treat Here’s a quiz: What bean grows in warm, moist climates and has annual world consumption of about 600,000 tons per year? If you’re thinking of coffee, you’d be wrong. It’s the cocoa bean, which area teens celebrated Sunday at the Lawrence Public Library with the third annual Chocolate Program. About 25 people attended the program, where the teens learned the history of chocolate and chocolate facts. And they chowed down on a variety of chocolate products, from white chocolate to unsweetened baking chocolate. Organizer Kim Patton, young adult specialist at the library, said the Chocolate Program was a fun way to celebrate Valentine’s Day without getting too lovey-dovey. _______ Brain Teaser: Hughes quiz, Day 12 This is one in a series of questions to test your knowledge on Langston Hughes, as part of the celebration of his 100th birthday. A new question will appear each day through Feb. 14. Each day’s answer will be posted at langstonhughes.ljworld.com. 12) Why did Langston Hughes’ father move to Mexico? Answer to Sunday’s question: Pinckney, New York and Central schools. _______ Community service: Jefferson County teen-agers help with anti-smoking effort Two area high school students are helping with a statewide anti-tobacco campaign. As members of Teens Against Smoking in Kansas, Ryan Bishop, a Jefferson West High School student, and Chris Dunn, a Perry-Lecompton High School student, are helping to organize three tobacco-resistance activities for youth. The Smoke-Free Teens are Rising Rallies will be in Hays, Wichita and Topeka later this month and in March. The events feature presentations about second-hand smoke, smokeless tobacco and local policy initiatives. Later this month, Bishop and Dunn will be featured as part of TASK’s anti-tobacco television advertisement campaign. The commercials will begin airing on area stations starting Feb. 18. In Jefferson County, Bishop and Dunn help promote the activities through Youth Against Drugs and Alcohol, which is sponsored by the county’s health department.
On the money
February 11, 2002
In a hot real estate market, buying property for asset purposes has become an attractive investment tool. But real estate investing is challenging and does not always offer foolproof returns. To learn more about how property buying and selling works, check out these books.
On the money
February 11, 2002
In a hot real estate market, buying property for asset purposes has become an attractive investment tool. But real estate investing is challenging and does not always offer foolproof returns. To learn more about how property buying and selling works, check out these books.
People
February 11, 2002
 Dietrich’s war effort  Playing for charity  Details, details  Quality-of-lif issues
On the record
February 11, 2002
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
On the record
February 11, 2002
World briefs
February 11, 2002
 Spurned boyfriend kills 11 in shooting spree  Oil minister resigns after deadly explosion  Fireworks blaze kills at least nine  Bus collision kills at least 14
World briefs
February 11, 2002
Spurned boyfriend kills 11 in shooting spree Oil minister resigns after deadly explosion Fireworks blaze kills at least nine Bus collision kills at least 14
Honor roll
February 11, 2002
Sebelius rejects Anthem takeover of Blue Cross-Blue Shield of Kansas
February 11, 2002
(Updated Monday at 11:33 a.m.) Insurance Commissioner Kathleen Sebelius on Monday rejected the proposed acquisition of the state’s largest health insurance company by an Indiana firm.
Sewer improvements assessments under scrutiny
February 11, 2002
Bottom Line Commissioners plan a very short meeting where they will have a hearing on proposed special assessments for sewer improvements on George Williams Way.
is good, mean fun
February 11, 2002
“Big Fat Liar” is “The Count of Monte Cristo” for middle-schoolers.
Notebook: Snafus keep fans from downhill event
February 11, 2002
For the second consecutive day, there were logistical problems that prevented spectators from reaching an Olympic event on time.
Study examines death penalty cases overturned on appeal
February 11, 2002
When jurors choose a death sentence in cases that are not among the “worst of the worst,” the sentence is more likely to be overturned on appeal, a study spanning 23 years of court records found.
Bradford scores 35 to lead Knights to romp
February 11, 2002
Former Kansas University basketball player Nick Bradford scored a season-high 35 points to lead the Kansas City Knights to a 120-94 romp over the Detroit Dogs in an ABA contest Sunday at Kemper Arena.
Lawmakers target soaring prescription costs
February 11, 2002
By Scott Rothschild Like thousands of Kansans, Shirley Russell’s pharmacy bill is one of her biggest expenses. Sixty-seven-year-old Russell, Lawrence, spends up to $400 a month on prescription medicine for heart problems, diabetes, lung disease and other ills. And she said the cost would be twice as much if her doctor didn’t provide free drug samples.
s trial threatens all Serbs
February 11, 2002
Barely 2 miles from the apartment houses that mark the northwest limits of this capital lies a training compound for elite police forces where last summer workers unearthed the bodies of scores of ethnic Albanians killed in the province of Kosovo.
careless rhetoric
February 11, 2002
By Trudy Rubin Knight Ridder Newspapers Republicans used to criticize the Clinton team for spouting tough moral rhetoric on foreign policy then failing to follow through. “Talk big and carry a twig” was the charge leveled against Madeleine Albright. So how come President Bush has let himself get snarled in a rhetorical trap that makes Albright’s polemics look puny?
U.S. marshals get their man, but not much attention
February 11, 2002
One fugitive was arrested at his wedding rehearsal dinner. Another was betrayed by his missing pinkie finger. A restaurant’s sparkling clean windows led to another bust.
Utility notice
February 11, 2002
To the editor: Cynthia McCarvel of Westar was quoted as saying that the best thing Westar can do to keep consumers informed about the progress of power restoration is to give updates through media outlets. How were those of us without electricity to power our televisions and radios supposed to receive those updates? I hope Westar will consider a hotline where consumers can speak to a live person instead of an automated system. Also, a big thank-you to the Westar personnel who have worked so hard to restore power. Your efforts are appreciated.
s findings will assist new VA committee with preventing post-war illnesses
February 11, 2002
Headaches. Fatigue. Joint pain. Muscle pain. Skin rashes. Nausea. Constant diarrhea. Neurological problems.
Axis of evil’ careless rhetoric
February 11, 2002
By Trudy Rubin Knight Ridder Newspapers Republicans used to criticize the Clinton team for spouting tough moral rhetoric on foreign policy then failing to follow through. “Talk big and carry a twig” was the charge leveled against Madeleine Albright. So how come President Bush has let himself get snarled in a rhetorical trap that makes Albright’s polemics look puny?
Drought hurting rural areas
February 11, 2002
A long stretch of dry weather that dried up the water has turned Carol Lekan’s dream home into a nightmare. Lekan has to take sponge baths, haul water to her home and try to recover from spending $7,000 to drill two wells, both of which came up dry.
Nation briefs
February 11, 2002
Fire destroys 16 home Half of money spewed from ATM returned Murderer-turned-author hangs self in prison Mausoleum to offer invitation-only crypts
Briefly
February 11, 2002
 Kidnap case at standstill  Officers’ remains recovered  Arms-smuggling charges filed  Self-proclaimed hostage won’t discuss abduction
Blind spending
February 11, 2002
To the editor: Webster defines “war” as “open and declared armed hostile conflict between states or nations.” It is difficult for me to understand how we can define our action in Afghanistan as “war” when it meets none of the tenants of its very definition. Unless, that is, Mr. Bush’s highly paid spin doctor (he hired one of the most noted advertising moguls in the U.S. to promote his “war”) told him there was no other way to get 84 percent of the American public’s support.
Your Money: A look at wine
February 11, 2002
Karen Bledsoe reports every week on consumer issues. This week’s topic: Wine.
More food aid needed
February 11, 2002
The U.N. World Food Program said it has received only a fraction of the aid needed to help feed starving North Korea, where at least 2 million young children may die of hunger.
Federal highway cuts bad news for area projects
February 11, 2002
By Chad Lawhorn President George’s Bush’s proposed budget, including a $9 billion cut in federal highway funding, would force about $60 million worth of reductions to Kansas transportation plans. Typically funding cuts roll down hill. That’s why Douglas County and Lawrence transportation leaders said they were concerned this week about the future of projects here.
effects on environment
February 11, 2002
By Terry Rombeck Last year’s anthrax scare put the spotlight on Cipro, the antibiotic used to treat the germ. But a group of Kansas University researchers already were working to learn more about Cipro and other antibiotics like it. Specifically, the researchers want to learn what effect the antibiotics have when they pass through the body and reach waterways.
Mission possible: Service makes home ownership a reality
February 11, 2002
By Mindie Paget Todd Ford and his young daughter, Cami Jo, had lived for eight years in a tiny apartment. There was so little room, Ford said, that it was hard for Cami Jo to have friends stay the night.
s aid
February 11, 2002
By Dave Ranney In Lawrence, when police respond to a domestic violence call, the abuser often spends the night in jail. The victim  almost always a woman  stays put. If she wants help, she’s encouraged to call Women’s Transitional Care Services.
Another garage?
February 11, 2002
Schwarzenegger muscles his way to No. 1 at box office
February 11, 2002
Arnold Schwarzenegger as an avenging firefighter hunting terrorists proved a solid attraction, though not quite a must-see movie.
J. Otto Lottes
February 11, 2002
Sound off
February 11, 2002
On Kansas Highway 10, there was a DeSoto exit and Eudora exit sign. They changed them to just street names in those towns, but they don’t discern which town the streets are in. For example, the two Eudora exits now just say Church Road and North 1400 Road. Why did they do that? Marty Matthews, a spokesman for the Kansas Department of Transportation, said the signs were replaced with new ones after the highway was repaved this fall. He said the new signs follow national guidelines set by the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices. The federal government specifies that highway exit signs should indicate a street designation, but there also are supplemental signs that will say, for example, “Eudora next two exits.”
NBA ALL-Star Game: Bryant powers West squad to 15-point rout
February 11, 2002
The booing began when Kobe Bryant was introduced, continued after he made a series of game-turning plays and reached a crescendo when he was handed the All-Star MVP trophy. Back in his hometown where the fans show him no love, Bryant received none Sunday. Instead, he was practically treated like a traitor by the notoriously harsh Philadelphia fans.
Grave site may yield homicide victims
February 11, 2002
Scammon residents will soon witness events more common to the deserts of Egypt than to southeast Kansas. Anthropologists soon will begin excavating a grave site south of the tiny city, looking for the remains of black coal miners who, according to legend, were murdered and then buried in an unmarked grave in the late 1800s.
Andean nations’ trade benefits lapse
February 11, 2002
It was promoted as a low-cost way for the United States to help Colombia and its neighbors fight drugs: Lower trade barriers to boost their economies, create jobs and give people an alternative to the drug trade.
British pay respects to Princess Margaret
February 11, 2002
Britons lined up Sunday at St. James’s Palace to sign condolence books for Princess Margaret, Queen Elizabeth II’s vivacious younger sister who died at age 71.
Oscar poised for breakthroughs
Nominations could elevate musicals, fantasies, black actors
February 11, 2002
This year’s Oscar show will feature one definite first, some possible firsts, and maybe a first or two in a long time.
People
February 11, 2002
Dietrich’s war effort Playing for charity Details, details Quality-of-lif issues
S.E. Asian group linked to al-Qaida
February 11, 2002
When Yazid Sufaat arrived home to Malaysia after months in southern Afghanistan, police were waiting.
Horoscopes
February 11, 2002
Books reveal intolerance
February 11, 2002
It’s hard to imagine that two such dissimilar characters as Pat Buchanan and Alan Dershowitz could have in common an authoritarian streak as wide as the New Jersey Turnpike.
SEC offers lesson on scams
February 11, 2002
The Web site for McWhortle Enterprises Inc. is pretty impressive. It has nice graphics, including a picture of its revolutionary product  a hand-held device that allows consumers to detect biohazardous materials such as anthrax. According to the company, the “Bio-Hazard Alert Detector” is powered by two AA batteries and emits an audible beep and flashes when in the presence of all known biohazards.
Railroad reform plan took the wrong track
February 11, 2002
With Amtrak’s future at stake, Congress may be finding that its previous attempt to turn the passenger railroad around had unintended consequences.
t step down amid sex abuse scandal
February 11, 2002
A confident Cardinal Bernard Law was interrupted by applause Sunday when he vowed he would not step down despite increasing pressure from a child sex abuse scandal.
Mystique never goes away for NBA legend at All-Star Game
February 11, 2002
Michael Jordan didn’t reign supreme at All-Star Weekend. The NBA’s official bobble-head doll, the one everyone took home in his or her free goodie bag, featured a caricature of someone else.
s Roundup: Terrapins stuff Tar Heels, 92-77
February 11, 2002
A week off worried Gary Williams. He let his third-ranked Maryland Terrapins know about it before meeting North Carolina.
Definition dilemma: HDTV offers clarity but limited programming options
February 11, 2002
The person who invented the wheel faced an immediate problem. No wagons.
s collection could fetch a pretty penny
February 11, 2002
Coca Cola memorabilia have long been highly sought-after collectibles. People search the Internet and antique stores and often pay high dollar for a piece of Coke history. The Lundeen family in Junction City has a large collection. Coke collecting has been a tradition of theirs, but maybe not for the same reasons other collectors search for the familiar red and white signature.
British pay respects to Princess Margaret
February 11, 2002
Britons lined up Sunday at St. James’s Palace to sign condolence books for Princess Margaret, Queen Elizabeth II’s vivacious younger sister who died at age 71.
Shed no tears
February 11, 2002
J-W Editorials Why all the concern for John Walker Lindh, who talked the terrorist talk and walked the terrorist walk? It is difficult for most of us to drum up sympathy for John Walker Lindh, the 20-year-old who chose to train with terrorists to help kill Americans through the Taliban operations in Afghanistan.
Roundup: Austrian stuns competitors
February 11, 2002
In one of the games’ traditional glamour events, tradition was served as Austrian Fritz Strobl  long overshadowed by more illustrious Austrian teammates  swept to the gold medal in the men’s downhill.
Pakistan leader hopes to solidify U.S. ties
February 11, 2002
When he meets with President Bush this week, Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf will be looking for more than a pat on the back for helping the war on terrorism.
S.E. Asian group linked to al-Qaida
February 11, 2002
When Yazid Sufaat arrived home to Malaysia after months in southern Afghanistan, police were waiting.
a mad delight
February 11, 2002
Passion, privilege and good old-fashioned British eccentricity combine to make “Love in a Cold Climate” (8 p.m., PBS) one of the funnier “Masterpiece Theatre” offerings in recent memory. Based on Nancy Mitford’s two novels, “The Pursuit of Love” and “Love in a Cold Climate,” the film follows three young women from the British upper class as they hunt for husbands during the 1930s, while The Great Depression and looming war threaten their very way of life.
Federal failure
February 11, 2002
To the editor: Here in America our hearts have been set on vengeance for five months. It seems to me that we have overlooked something important. On the evening of Sept. 11, we might have expected the president to go on national TV and say something like this:
Internet can save time, money
February 11, 2002
This is a good time to take a fresh look not only at your waistline, but also your bottom line. Managing your finances digitally can give you more insight into where your money is going, a greater ability to move it around and improved tools for quickly reacting to new information. It also requires that you think harder about keeping your information secure.
On the street
February 11, 2002
Asked at Lawrence High School Should schools filter Internet access?
Drought hurting rural areas
February 11, 2002
A long stretch of dry weather that dried up the water has turned Carol Lekan’s dream home into a nightmare. Lekan has to take sponge baths, haul water to her home and try to recover from spending $7,000 to drill two wells, both of which came up dry.
Palestinian rockets may deliver deadly chemical payloads
February 11, 2002
Palestinian militants in the Gaza Strip fired what appeared to be two next-generation rockets into Israel on Sunday, marking a strategic shift in warfare that is likely to heighten fears in Israeli border cities. The rockets, which may have carried up to 22 pounds of explosives, landed harmlessly and were overshadowed by violence in the Negev Desert city of Beersheba, where gunmen linked to the militant Hamas organization killed two Israelis and wounded four others.
Nominations could elevate musicals, fantasies, black actors
February 11, 2002
This year’s Oscar show will feature one definite first, some possible firsts, and maybe a first or two in a long time.
trade benefits lapse
February 11, 2002
It was promoted as a low-cost way for the United States to help Colombia and its neighbors fight drugs: Lower trade barriers to boost their economies, create jobs and give people an alternative to the drug trade.
Investigator appointed in Irish bank loss
February 11, 2002
Allied Irish Banks PLC appointed a senior American banker Sunday to oversee an internal probe into $750 million in allegedly fraudulent losses at its U.S. subsidiary, Allfirst Bank of Baltimore.
Notebook: Snafus keep fans from downhill event
February 11, 2002
For the second consecutive day, there were logistical problems that prevented spectators from reaching an Olympic event on time.
Roundup: Austrian stuns competitors
February 11, 2002
In one of the games’ traditional glamour events, tradition was served as Austrian Fritz Strobl long overshadowed by more illustrious Austrian teammates swept to the gold medal in the men’s downhill.
Internet can save time, money
February 11, 2002
This is a good time to take a fresh look not only at your waistline, but also your bottom line. Managing your finances digitally can give you more insight into where your money is going, a greater ability to move it around and improved tools for quickly reacting to new information. It also requires that you think harder about keeping your information secure.
U.S. marshals get their man, but not much attention
February 11, 2002
One fugitive was arrested at his wedding rehearsal dinner. Another was betrayed by his missing pinkie finger. A restaurant’s sparkling clean windows led to another bust.
Enron scandal puts focus on Lieberman
February 11, 2002
By George Will Washington Post Writers Group Among Sen. Joseph Lieberman’s golden memories from the 2000 campaign is of a 6 a.m. (“typical compulsive Gore scheduling,” he says) visit, with Al Gore, to a fire station in Hollywood, Fla. Lieberman asked the firefighters what they generally talked about at breakfast. He expected them to say sports. They said the stock market. “Modern capitalism,” says Lieberman, contemplating Enron’s interesting variety of it, “has no conscience.” Which is, Lieberman understands, a strength of capitalism: It is marvelously efficient at allocating resources because it is single-minded about efficiency measured in profit.
David A. Bennett
February 11, 2002
Top 25 Men’s Roundup: Terrapins stuff Tar Heels, 92-77
February 11, 2002
A week off worried Gary Williams. He let his third-ranked Maryland Terrapins know about it before meeting North Carolina.
Bradford scores 35 to lead Knights to romp
February 11, 2002
Former Kansas University basketball player Nick Bradford scored a season-high 35 points to lead the Kansas City Knights to a 120-94 romp over the Detroit Dogs in an ABA contest Sunday at Kemper Arena.
Texas freshman impresses Kansas
February 11, 2002
By Gary Bedore Everybody in college basketball is buzzing about Texas point guard T.J. Ford, who is on track to become the first freshman in history to lead the country in assists. “He’s good, man,” exclaimed Kansas freshman point Aaron Miles, a teammate of the 5-foot-10, 165-pound Houston native in last year’s McDonald’s High School All-America game. “He can dribble, push the ball, pass, is real good defensively. He pretty much does everything well.”
Births
February 11, 2002
 Christina Robson and David Pennewell, Lawrence, a girl, Saturday.
Enron scandal puts focus on Lieberman
February 11, 2002
By George Will Washington Post Writers Group Among Sen. Joseph Lieberman’s golden memories from the 2000 campaign is of a 6 a.m. (“typical compulsive Gore scheduling,” he says) visit, with Al Gore, to a fire station in Hollywood, Fla. Lieberman asked the firefighters what they generally talked about at breakfast. He expected them to say sports. They said the stock market. “Modern capitalism,” says Lieberman, contemplating Enron’s interesting variety of it, “has no conscience.” Which is, Lieberman understands, a strength of capitalism: It is marvelously efficient at allocating resources because it is single-minded about efficiency measured in profit.
Clark claims gold for U.S.
February 11, 2002
OK, snowboarders, maybe the Olympics really are cool, after all. Kelly Clark flew higher and nailed more dangerous tricks than anyone in the halfpipe Sunday to become the first American to take gold at the Salt Lake City Olympics.
Schwarzenegger muscles his way to No. 1 at box office
February 11, 2002
Arnold Schwarzenegger as an avenging firefighter hunting terrorists proved a solid attraction, though not quite a must-see movie.
Former Enron chief to take 5th at Senate hearing Tuesday
February 11, 2002
Former Enron chairman Kenneth Lay will assert his right against self-incrimination and refuse to answer questions when he appears before Congress under subpoena this week, his spokeswoman said Sunday night.
J. Otto Lottes
February 11, 2002
Services for J. Otto Lottes, 95, Lawrence, will be at 10 a.m. Wednesday at Hoffmeister’s Colonial Chapel, St. Louis. Burial will be in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, St. Louis. Dr. Lottes died Thursday, Feb. 7, 2002, at Brandon Woods Retirement Center.
Horoscopes
February 11, 2002
For Monday, Feb. 11, 2002, those with birthdays today: You’re personality plus this year, as you greet new possibilities. Think through decisions, especially if you notice an impulsive quality around them. Fast actions often backfire. You will transform in new ways, making different choices as a result. If you are single, a friendship could easily develop into more, or you will meet an important person through a friend. If you are attached, you will discover that a loved one might develop a different set of priorities. Don’t feel intimidated. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult
Katheryn Ann Sanderson
February 11, 2002
Mass of Christian Burial for Katheryn Ann Sanderson, 21, McLouth, will be at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, Tonganoxie. Burial will be in Sacred Heart Cemetery. Mrs. Sanderson died Saturday, Feb. 9, 2002, at Kansas University Medical Center in Kansas City, Kan.
Honor roll
February 11, 2002
Central Junior High School announces students who made honors during the fall 2001 semester. Students who made the Principal’s Honor Roll earned a 3.50 to 4.0 grade point average. Students listed on the Mustang Honor Roll earned a 3.0 to 3.49 GPA. Principal’s Honor Roll
Nation briefs
February 11, 2002
 Fire destroys 16 home  Half of money spewed from ATM returned  Murderer-turned-author hangs self in prison  Mausoleum to offer invitation-only crypts
Shed no tears
February 11, 2002
J-W Editorials Why all the concern for John Walker Lindh, who talked the terrorist talk and walked the terrorist walk? It is difficult for most of us to drum up sympathy for John Walker Lindh, the 20-year-old who chose to train with terrorists to help kill Americans through the Taliban operations in Afghanistan.
February 11, 2002
(Web Posted Monday at 7:01 a.m.) Fifty-nine women graduated Monday from a health care course offered by the Afghan Red Crescent Society  a significant step for a nation where women had been banned from education under the radical Taliban regime and where medical care is sorely deficient.
Langford eager to play in Lone Star State
February 11, 2002
Keith Langford may have some extra incentive in tonight’s Kansas-Texas game. Not only will the Fort Worth, Texas, freshman be playing before a batch of friends and relatives in his home state and an ESPN Big Monday audience, but he’ll be playing against a program that didn’t want him.
Jayhawks knock off ASU
February 11, 2002
Solo home runs by Katie Campbell and Christi Musser and a pinch-hit triple by Courtney Wright boosted Kansas to a stunning 3-2 softball win over sixth-ranked Arizona State on Sunday in the Fiesta Bowl Classic.
Immediate needs for volunteers
February 11, 2002
Here are some other volunteer opportunities in Douglas County:
Earnhardt Jr. takes second at Daytona event
February 11, 2002
Rules nearly overshadowed racing Sunday in the Budweiser Shootout.
House expects fight about telemarketing
February 11, 2002
A legislative battle looms over telemarketing.
One dead as illness sweeps convention
February 11, 2002
A mysterious illness killed one woman attending a weekend convention and sent seven others to hospitals, but health officials said Sunday they didn’t think anyone else who didn’t already have symptoms would get sick.
Family event needs help
February 11, 2002
Agency: Families Together Inc.
Oil spill cleanup begins off New Zealand coast
February 11, 2002
Workers with shovels and front-end loaders began cleaning tons of oil Sunday from the beaches of a northeastern New Zealand town after salvage teams reduced the flow of the heavy fuel from a stricken cargo ship grounded offshore.
Activists urge U.N. to lead relief effort for N. Korea refugees
February 11, 2002
The United Nations should spearhead relief efforts for North Korean refugees in China and Russia, delegates said Sunday on the final day of an international conference on human rights in North Korea.
Grave site may yield homicide victims
February 11, 2002
Scammon residents will soon witness events more common to the deserts of Egypt than to southeast Kansas. Anthropologists soon will begin excavating a grave site south of the tiny city, looking for the remains of black coal miners who, according to legend, were murdered and then buried in an unmarked grave in the late 1800s.
Popular springtime destination considers pay-as-you-go policy
February 11, 2002
The smell of high-octane gas and the buzz of cars whizzing around a racetrack are in the air. The traffic is thickening on International Speedway Boulevard, this city’s main thoroughfare.
Jackson lifts Bulldogs past OSU, 58-52
February 11, 2002
A minor adjustment in Damon Jackson’s shot made a huge difference for Fresno State.
sentiment leans primarily toward Iraq
February 11, 2002
Emboldened by success in Afghanistan, some lawmakers are beating the drum for quick action to get rid of Iraq’s Saddam Hussein. They take a different view of other nations singled out by President Bush as trouble. Saddam should be removed, and soon, Democratic Sen. Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut said Sunday. “He is a time bomb.”
Westminster to pay tribute to Sept. 11 rescue dogs
February 11, 2002
Most years, Apollo would never make it to the Westminster dog show. He’s getting a bit gray in the muzzle, his teeth are yellowing, and he’s slowing down. Not at all like the 2,500 perfectly primped pooches at America’s most prestigious canine competition.
U.S. probes allegations prisoners taken in raid were beaten
February 11, 2002
(Web Posted Monday at 4:33 p.m.) The Pentagon’s military spokesman on the Afghan war on Monday defended a CIA missile strike last week that killed an unknown number of individuals, saying they “were not innocents” and that “something untoward” was going on at the time of the attack.
s New
February 11, 2002
 Video games go hi-fi  3G mobile phones deliver little but thrill of possession
t look to the Web for Olympics video highlights
February 11, 2002
Perhaps you want to catch a replay of a breathtaking downhill run or missed the misstep that cost a promising figure skater the gold. You won’t find video of Olympic events on the Internet during the Winter Games. You’ll have to settle for photos online.
Stevens plans to be back in lineup
February 11, 2002
By Steve Rottinghaus Free State High coach Darrell Andrew plans on his senior standout Justin Stevens being available for the Class 6A wrestling regional Saturday at Olathe South. Stevens returned home late Saturday night after sustaining a concussion when he inadvertently butted foreheads with Olathe South’s Justin Dyer in the 189-pound final of the Sunflower League meet earlier Saturday at Olathe North. With his neck in a brace, Stevens was taken away on a stretcher to Olathe Medical Center for X-rays.
s moguls definitely terror-proof
February 11, 2002
I came here to watch the women’s moguls competition, along with 13,500 spectators, several dozen of whom actually saw the event. The rest will not get through the security system until June at the earliest. There is no way a terrorist could ever make it past the fiendishly clever, multiple-level defenses that have been set up to prevent penetration of the moguls competition. The first line of defense is the Olympic transit system, which is a series of buses you must take to get anywhere, with each bus populated by friendly Utah residents, every one of whom asks you where you’re from.
World Online report: Kansas wins overtime thriller, 110-103
February 11, 2002
(Web Posted Monday at 10:46 p.m.) Two Kansas freshmen got a little older on the road. With Drew Gooden in foul trouble for most of the night, Wayne Simien and Aaron Miles stepped up and turned in performances that would look good on a graduating senior.
Another garage?
February 11, 2002
To the editor: As taxpayers, we are appalled that the governing body of our city would even think about building another parking garage. The new parking garage on New Hampshire will never pay for itself. Why should we taxpayers be asked to pay for something that will benefit The World Co.? They have a monopoly on the communications business in this town so why can’t they build their own parking facility? Our city commission should start thinking about how to better utilize the fine facilities we have instead of spending, spending, spending.
6News video: Sebelius turns down Anthem-Blue Cross merger
February 11, 2002
(Web Posted Monday at 3:47 p.m.) Kansas Insurance Commissioner Kathleen Sebelius explains at a press conference Monday why she denied the merger between Anthem and Blue Cross-Blue Shield of Kansas.
Utility notice
February 11, 2002
Blind spending
February 11, 2002
Immediate needs for volunteers
February 11, 2002
Here are some other volunteer opportunities in Douglas County:
Former owner of bottling company keeps Coca-Cola memories alive
Junction City family’s collection could fetch a pretty penny
February 11, 2002
Coca Cola memorabilia have long been highly sought-after collectibles. People search the Internet and antique stores and often pay high dollar for a piece of Coke history. The Lundeen family in Junction City has a large collection. Coke collecting has been a tradition of theirs, but maybe not for the same reasons other collectors search for the familiar red and white signature.