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Archive for Sunday, May 6, 2001

All stories

Motley Fool
May 6, 2001
ASK THE FOOL Allocation
KU at Desert Classic
May 6, 2001
Kansas University’s Kenny Gregory scored 17 points on 8-of-14 shooting to pace the Atlantic team to an 86-81 victory over the Pacific team at the Nike Desert Classic for NBA prospects. KU’s Eric Chenowith scored 10 points on 5-of-7 shooting as the Central team defeated the Midwest, 95-83, in another Classic game.
SUN Economy vs. environment
May 6, 2001
When asked, “Should economic development and concern for the natural environment be given equal weight in making growth plans and decisions?” this was the response: l Yes — 83.7 percent
Friends and Neighbors, hero wanted
May 6, 2001
TONY, 6, ENJOYS SWIMMING, BOWLING, CRAFTS AND PAINTING. He is one of many children waiting to be matched with a mentor through Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Douglas County. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer mentor, please attend an informational meeting at 5:15 p.m. Tuesdays or noon Wednesdays at the organization’s office, 211 E. Eighth St., Suite G, or call Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Douglas County.
Taken to task
May 6, 2001
Gardeners have plenty to do in May
Baldwin rental parking soundoff
May 6, 2001
What is Baldwin’s policy requiring landlords to provide off-street parking for tenants? Baldwin City Administrator Larry Paine said landlords typically are required to provide parking for their tenants either in carports, garages or at the end of the right-of-way on the property.
SUN Sexually charged exhibit
May 6, 2001
jbiles@ljworld.com Anna Glynn’s Barbie and Ken photographs are not for little girls.
Senator, representative trade barbs on school negotiations
May 6, 2001
Negotiators took Saturday off from their deliberations on a bill to allocate $2.26 billion to public education. House members said the differences are few and will be resolved, while senators grew impatient over what they viewed as delaying tactics.
Blind since birth, 21-year-old adjusts to new sense of sight
May 6, 2001
In 20 minutes, Keri-Ann Ruemmler’s world changed from a mostly dark place to one filled with astonishing sights and beautiful people. Ruemmler had been legally blind and profoundly deaf since she was born three months prematurely in July 1979. Ophthalmologists said they could not do much for her. “We had been told her sight would progressively get worse,” said her mother, Sally Ruemmler of Olathe.
On the record
May 6, 2001
Briefs
May 6, 2001
Briefcase
May 6, 2001
Be honest, don’t complain during job interviews Name that company Firm says use fingers, thumb to make impression
Disney parks provide ideal family fare
California Adventure offers wild ride and some tamer ones, too
May 6, 2001
The Mouse has been billing its new theme park, Disney’s California Adventure in Anaheim, as an authentic sampling of the Golden State. But are you wasting your time and money roaming around a prefab California when the real thing is just outside Mickey’s door?
Bicentennial flashback: Remembering the events lost in fireworks’ shadow
May 6, 2001
By Calder Pickett Twenty-five years ago we were hearing “Yankee Doodle” and “Stars and Stripes Forever” so often that they could have led a Hit Parade. A magnificent flotilla of tall ships sailed along the Hudson. The Queen of England sent a message of congratulations. Guns were fired from that ancient vessel “Old lronsides.”
Multimedia ‘Waltz Project’ a stunner
May 6, 2001
By Jan Biles Kansas University theater professor Marianne Kubik’s academic research into a singular dance form could be dry as a bone, but instead has resulted in an entertaining, probing multimedia work called “The Waltz Project.”
Youngsters get creative to honor mom and dad on their special days
May 6, 2001
Nothing says Mother’s Day like a noodle necklace. And for dads, there’s probably a tie made out of construction paper waiting to be made for Father’s Day. Parents love to get any little thing from their kids, says Joyce Marlow, author of “Making Memories: Celebrating Mothers and Daughters Through Traditions, Crafts and Lore” (Simon & Schuster, $14). Kids’ gifts are usually simple and endearingly sweet and always appreciated.
SAT debate intensifies
May 6, 2001
The applicant from Maine has a 2.3 grade-point average and her personal essay is similarly undistinguished. But she is a candidate to join her sister on Wheaton College’s nationally ranked soccer team, which draws special attention from the admissions committee.
Photo exhibit ushers in National Tourism Week
May 6, 2001
By Jan Biles What entices visitors to come to Lawrence? Do people come to shop downtown, to attend arts events or antique shows, to root for the Jayhawks all of the above? And once they are here, just what do they see and what images remain with them? Those questions often are on the minds of Lawrence Convention and Visitors Bureau employees.
President considers missile defense options
May 6, 2001
The year is 2015, the adversary, North Korea. A missile roars into the sky on a mission to rain destruction on Los Angeles. The United States has about 30 minutes to save the city.
Shimomura in Idaho
Artist depicts life in internment camp
May 6, 2001
Artist Roger Shimomura vividly remembers the day in 1942 when a friend came to visit him at the internment camp. Shimomura was 3 years old and his family had just been transported from Seattle to the Minidoka Relocation Center northeast of Twin Falls, Idaho, during World War II. The camp was one of 10 sites where 120,000 West Coast Americans of Japanese origin were held during the ethnic hysteria that followed the bombing of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.
Pope calls for peace
May 6, 2001
Pope John Paul II brought prayers for Mideast peace and interfaith tolerance Saturday to this city that is central to the history of both Christianity and Islam. But blunt words from Syria’s president, who said those responsible for the current “subjugation and persecution” of modern-day Palestinians also betrayed Jesus Christ, underscored the deep schisms governing the region.
Ivan Glenn
May 6, 2001
5-6 Kovels cutline
May 6, 2001
THIS CONGRESSIONAL DESK, PROBABLY made by Hazelton & Company of Boston, was sold recently for $14,950.
WKD Breakout on rape survivor resources
May 6, 2001
Where to turn Survivors of sexual assault can find help from the following Lawrence organizations:
SUN Tourism photo exhibit
May 6, 2001
jbiles@ljworld.com What entices visitors to come to Lawrence?
Kansas halts Nebraska softball streak
May 6, 2001
cwoodling@ljworld.com All Megan Urquhart felt she could do was try to dislodge the ball from the catcher’s glove.
Check Forge
May 6, 2001
Suspect accused of forgery Lawrence Police arrested a 22-year-old man Saturday morning in the 2500 Block of Rawhide Lane. The man allegedly attempted to forge another individual’s name on a check at the Douglas County Bank, 300 W. Ninth St.
KU baseball beats KSU
May 6, 2001
lchronister@ljworld.com Nearing the end of a disapointing season, Kansas University’s baseball team might have found a bit of a silver lining Saturday night.
Fire ants spreading in Lawrence ––— Residents can help in stopping invasion, entomologist says
May 6, 2001
trombeck@ljworld.com The fire ants are marching by the thousands in southwest Lawrence, and it may be too late to stop them from spreading.
5-6 yard containers break
May 6, 2001
These catalogs offer a selection of garden containers. Contact them to join the mailing list or get more information: l Gardener’s Supply Company, 128 Intervale Road, Burlington, Vt. 05401; www.gardeners.com; (800) 955-3370.
s Virtue, Criswell place second
May 6, 2001
srottinghaus@ljworld.com Free State High senior diver Jessica Virtue entered the Sunflower League swimming and diving meet Saturday at Knox Natatorium hoping just to crack the top five.
Rape survivor recovering with local help
May 6, 2001
jmathis@ljworld.com www.emdr.com/
Trends
May 6, 2001
Former resident exhibits work at Lindsborg gallery Time to submit information for KU Edition Restaurant, club raise funds for epilepsy research Spencer Museum acquires works of female artists
What’s new
May 6, 2001
Wading through the numbers to select your computer Mother’s Day goes high-tech Game Boy isn’t good enough
Lawrence school board briefs
May 6, 2001
Agenda highlights 7 p.m. Monday 110 McDonald Drive
Rape survivor recovering with local help, support
May 6, 2001
By Joel Mathis Clarissa Allen says she’s getting better. But there are still moments when she finds herself haunted by the memory of being raped. “I go into a grocery store and I worry about who’s behind me,” said the 27-year-old Lawrence woman. “I worry about people who see me, if they can see what I’ve been through.”
Parade features art on wheels
Downtown observers enjoy Art Tougeau’s amusing creations Saturday
May 6, 2001
By Terry Rombeck It was almost as if members of Van Go Mobile Arts had planned on rain. Their entry for Saturday’s Art Tougeau parade a colorful wooden cart that eventually will be used to sell art downtown had a built-in umbrella on a pole. So as other groups waited in the rain for their entries to be judged, the Van Go members huddled under their umbrella.
Early government pieces have prestige
Until 1960s, White House remodelings put furniture on the market
May 6, 2001
For many years, retiring public officials took some government office furniture with them when they left. Collectors like the pieces because the historic ownership adds to the prestige, value and “aura.”
Bookstore
May 6, 2001
Budget plan runs aground in resistant Kansas House
May 6, 2001
A plan for balancing the state budget stalled Saturday in the House, falling victim to a coalition of Republicans who opposed the proposal’s modest tax increases and Democrats who hoped to rewrite it.
Where does the time go?
Families challenged by life’s frenetic pace
May 6, 2001
By Theresa Freed Darren Rausch works 12-hour days. He sleeps six hours a night, unless his 5-month-old daughter or 2-year-old son wakes up. Commuting to his job as a veterinarian in Overland Park takes two hours a day. And the Lawrence resident still has a long list of other tasks to be done every day.
SUN Tourism photo box
May 6, 2001
A view of Lawrence What: National Tourism Week photo exhibit.
WKD-Where Time Goes
May 6, 2001
tfreed@ljworld.com Darren Rausch works 12-hour days. He sleeps six hours a night, unless his 5-month-old daughter or 2-year-old son wakes up.
Governor gets mental health parity proposal
May 6, 2001
srothschild@ljworld.com Topeka — Two final pleas both for and against expanding health insurance for mental illness.
5-6 Time Goes-Retirees sidebar
May 6, 2001
tfreed@ljworld.com Too little time and too much stress aren’t problems unique to today’s young couples.
shadow
May 6, 2001
Twenty-five years ago we were hearing “Yankee Doodle” and “Stars and Stripes Forever” so often that they could have led a Hit Parade. A magnificent flotilla of tall ships sailed along the Hudson. The Queen of England sent a message of congratulations. Guns were fired from that ancient vessel “Old lronsides.” The biggest cherry pie anybody had ever seen was baked, and the biggest firecrackers were set off. It was 1976, and it was the year of the Bicentennial, something we had been leading up to for years. I don’t know how many Bicentennial hours I had on my radio program, including several after the Fourth of July, 1976.
Some judgments will always be murky
May 6, 2001
Have you weighed in on Bob Kerrey and the massacre at Thanh Phong yet? Your options are hero or villain. Please choose: That’s the American way. You know the story by now, as told in last Sunday’s New York Times Magazine. One dark night in 1969, a dozen to 20 civilians were killed in a Vietnamese hamlet called Thanh Phong. Bob Kerrey — the then-25-year-old who would become governor and senator from Nebraska — was in charge.
re invited
May 6, 2001
You’re invited to a town-hall style meeting to discuss growth issues from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday at Liberty Hall. The “Finding Common Ground” meeting will let residents express ideas and ask questions of panelists and others in attendance. Dale Goter, of the statewide public television program “Kansas Week,” will be the moderator.
Births
May 6, 2001
* Doug and Beth McIntyre, Lawrence, a boy, Friday. * Kevin and Amy Miller, Eudora, a girl, Saturday.
Works of art on wheels ––— Art Tougeau parade rolls through downtown Lawrence
May 6, 2001
trombeck@ljworld.com It was almost as if members of Van Go Mobile Arts had planned on rain.
Horoscopes
May 6, 2001
San Antonio cruises - Spurs 94, Mavericks 78
Duncan scores 31 points, grabs 13 rebounds
May 6, 2001
The Battle of Texas is off to a bruising start. Tim Duncan scored 31 points and grabbed 13 rebounds, and the San Antonio Spurs overcame the loss of Derek Anderson to beat Dallas 94-78 on Saturday night in the Western Conference semifinal opener.
New fund-raising exhibit also to benefit artists
May 6, 2001
By Jan Biles Organizers of a new juried art exhibit not only hope to benefit a community agency but also hope to promote sales of local artworks. “Lawrence Own-Your-Own” will be displayed from Sept. 29 to Oct. 7 at Fields Gallery, 712 Mass.
Noth stars in two-night ‘Judge’ television movie
May 6, 2001
Chris Noth may have been bummed, for the moment, about his knee, but he couldn’t be happier about his new TV movie. Noth both stars in and has a producer credit in “Steve Martini’s The Judge,” a two-night, four-hour NBC legal mystery airing at 8 p.m. today and Monday.
Theater offers all-Christie season
British playhouse performs 23 plays of famed mystery writer
May 6, 2001
In a bare rehearsal room, among pieces of threadbare furniture and sagging drapes, a group of actors feverishly works on scenes from Agatha Christie’s rarely performed play, “Fiddlers Three.”
LHS baseball
May 6, 2001
J-W Staff Report Lawrence High’s red-hot baseball team swept Shawnee Mission North, 1-0 and 13-3, on Saturday at Ice Field.
matches volunteers with clients receiving services at Bert Nash center
May 6, 2001
mbelt@ljworld.com When Elizabeth sought treatment for mental illness 10 years ago she lost all her old friends.
Thirsting for low prices ––— Rising gasoline costs drain resources of summer travelers
May 6, 2001
mfagan@ljworld.com MORE: www.ljworld.com/section/gasoline
Nation Briefs
May 6, 2001
Missouri: Former Polish president shares democracy views San Diego: New court decision leads to extradition
SUN rail
May 6, 2001
Former resident exhibits work at Lindsborg gallery
World Brief
May 6, 2001
Peru: Investigation under way into mass grave
Battle continues against fire ant assault
Agriculture Department entomologist enlists residents’ help in stopping invasion
May 6, 2001
By Terry Rombeck The fire ants are marching by the thousands in southwest Lawrence, and it may be too late to stop them from spreading. Glen Salsbury, an entomologist with the Kansas Department of Agriculture, told Lawrence residents Saturday that any hope of stopping the pests will require a community effort. “You’re our first line of defense,” Salsbury said. “You’re out in your yard every day, mowing your grass and planting flowers.”
Brewer picked
May 6, 2001
Free State High senior lineman Craig Brewer has been selected for the Metro Classic football game next month. The site and date for the game have yet to be announced.
NHL Playoffs: Barnes’ goal propels Buffalo past Penguins
Sabres take 3-2 lead in best-of-seven set
May 6, 2001
Buffalo’s Stu Barnes doesn’t have anything against his former team. The Pittsburgh Penguins probably don’t agree. With his second consecutive game-winner, Barnes capped a three-goal comeback, slapping a 40-footer in off the crossbar 8:34 into overtime to seal the Sabres’ 3-2 victory Saturday.
Oh, Yuck’ is gross but informational, too
May 6, 2001
By Jill Hummels We’ve entered a new age, one where gross is great and the disgusting is downright delightful. One book holds an enviable position in this world of nasty novelties. “Oh Yuck: The Encyclopedia of Everything Nasty” delivers youngsters a dose of bad medicine they can’t get enough of.
Arts become more accessible for disabled
May 6, 2001
Dennis Sparacino’s fingers glide over the cold bronze toes, curve up and around the muscular torso and dip into the crater at the top of the sculpture. A “touch tour” allows him to experience, in the only way he can, a cast of the “Headless Naked Figure Study for Balzac” that Auguste Rodin crafted in 1896.
Losing track of time
Days aren’t long enough for some busy families
May 6, 2001
By Theresa Freed Every day on his way home to Lawrence from work in Topeka, Jeremy Anderson calls his wife on the cell phone. In those few moments they discuss their day, tasks that need to be done and their children. Jeremy and Cherise Anderson who have two children, Caden, 1 1/2, and newborn Makenna say their talks snatched during the commutes are all the time they have for quality conversation.
Court order can require HIV test
May 6, 2001
Confession a starting point to improving communication
May 6, 2001
Local briefs
May 6, 2001
Brewer picked Free State High senior lineman Craig Brewer has been selected for the Metro Classic football game next month. The site and date for the game have yet to be announced.
Sunday datebook
May 6, 2001
TODAY Through May 31: Community Children’s Center Head Start Program accepts applications for fall preschool program, 925 Vt., 842-2515.
Kehde column
May 6, 2001
On Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this spring, when the sky looked as dreamy and warm as an Albert Bierstadt painting and the wind refrained from howling, a small coterie of fishermen ventured to Melvern Lake to give chase to a smallmouth bass of grand proportions. This noble fish is a relative newcomer to these parts.
Poll: Growth could sour city’s ‘flavor’
May 6, 2001
By Richard Brack Enough is enough. That’s the sentiment of many Douglas County residents about the prospect of more growth in the Lawrence area. Though the past decade’s growth is seen as positive and residents say many recent development projects were handled well, more than half are worried that more growth will make the area either “less desirable” or “much less desirable.”
5-6 Time Goes SUN ARTS
May 6, 2001
tfreed@ljworld.com Every day on his way home to Lawrence from work in Topeka, Jeremy Anderson calls his wife, Cherise, on his cell phone.
World Brief
May 6, 2001
Kazakstan: First space vacation coming to an end today
Reinhard services
May 6, 2001
People
May 6, 2001
Actor Robert Blake’s wife shot to death near restaurant Death penalty opponent speaks as McVeigh nears execution Berry to settle case out of court Conductor says Wagner concert in Israel should be performed
Mental health parity bill awaits Graves’ signature
May 6, 2001
By Scott Rothschild Two final pleas both for and against expanding health insurance for mental illness. A long vote-count in the House, where more than 20 lawmakers switched their votes, some three times. Then the gavel. And what hadn’t happened after years of political fighting happened Saturday the Legislature gave Gov. Bill Graves what is called a mental health parity bill to sign into law.
Truman award honors late governor
May 6, 2001
Sen. Jean Carnahan said Friday night that voters were in a defiant mood when they returned Harry S. Truman to the White House in 1948, and when they voted for her husband, the late Gov. Mel Carnahan, in the U.S. Senate race even after he died in a plane crash last October.
Accident claims three lives
May 6, 2001
Three people were killed early Saturday in a traffic accident in Wichita. Police said a sports utility vehicle crashed into a tree in a northwest Wichita neighborhood. Two people died at the scene.
Newspaper publisher surrenders law license
May 6, 2001
Wyandotte County political figure David W. Carson, who has been the subject of several legal actions, was disbarred Friday by the Kansas Supreme Court. The court’s order of disbarment said the clerk of the Kansas appellate courts received a letter from Carson Monday indicating that he would surrender his license. Attorneys facing charges of misconduct who voluntarily surrender their license are automatically disbarred, according to Kansas Supreme Court rules.
Ten Commandments display finds new home at college
May 6, 2001
A display of the Ten Commandments that had been the center of a two-year controversy has a new home at Manhattan Christian College. About 200 people gathered Friday for the college’s dedication of its new Heritage Court entrance, which will have the Ten Commandments monolith as its centerpiece.
Sirens’ silence praised
County officials say warnings would have brought people outside
May 6, 2001
No sirens warned Hoisington residents that a tornado was headed their way April 21. But some public officials say the silence might have saved lives. The officials said curiosity might have been costly.
Cecile M. Culp
May 6, 2001
Cherry services
May 6, 2001
Bert Nash program relies on friends
Compeer’ matches volunteers with clients receiving services at mental health center
May 6, 2001
By Mike Belt When Elizabeth sought treatment for mental illness 10 years ago she lost all her old friends. She also made a new friend one that she still has today and one she expects she will have for a lifetime. Although the 43-year-old Lawrence woman still receives services from the Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center, Elizabeth hasn’t been an in-patient for six years.
Area briefs
May 6, 2001
Suspect accused of forgery Car donations sought
Briefly____________________
May 6, 2001
honors: KU seniors receive Fulbright grants Two Kansas University seniors have received Fulbright grants for the 2001-2002 school year. Sean Gordon and Nikki Horne will receive the awards, which cover round-trip travel, health insurance and living expenses for a year of study overseas. Both will graduate from KU later this month. Gordon, a genetics major from Overland Park, will study in a new international molecular biology program sponsored by the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry and the Georg-August University in Goettingen, Germany. Horne, a psychology major from Lenexa, will use her grant to conduct neuropsychological research at the Centre de Neuropsychologie et du Langage in Paris. Her research focuses on treatment and rehabilitation for patients with multiple sclerosis. The grants are named in honor of J. William Fulbright, a former U.S. senator from Arkansas. engineering school: Associate professor named associate engineering dean Associate professor Robert Sorem has been named associate dean of the Kansas University School of Engineering. Sorem has taught mechanical engineering at KU since 1994. He received his bachelor’s degree from KU in 1986, his master’s in 1988 and his doctorate in 1991. He will replace Tom Mulinazzi, who announced in December that he would step down to teach more civil engineering classes. Sorem plans to work alongside Mulinazzi for several months to learn more about the job. Sorem will officially take over the position sometime this summer. The associate dean oversees students’ academic standing, undergraduate recruitment and the admission of freshmen, transfer students and graduate students to the school. Fund-raiser: Restaurant’s omelet day to benefit epilepsy alliance First Watch will serve free omelets from 6:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday to raise money for the Alliance for Epilepsy Research. Patrons are encouraged to donate the cost of the omelet to the alliance to help find better treatments and ultimately a cure for epilepsy. The restaurant is at 2540 Iowa. Awards: Haskell names its student of the year Haskell Indian Nations University student Toni Tsatoke has been named a recipient of the eighth annual Student of the Year scholarships. To win the award, students must have at least a 3.0 grade-point average and be active in the community. The $1,000 scholarship covers half a year’s tuition at a tribal college. Tsatoke is working toward an associate of arts degree in education and has been involved in organizations such as Miss AIHEC, cheerleading and serving as a Miss Indian USA court member. She is also a former Miss Haskell and reports for the Indian Leader. Scholarships were awarded to tribal college students from 31 tribal colleges in a ceremony at the American Indian Higher Education Consortium’s spring conference. honors: KU seniors receive Fulbright grants Two Kansas University seniors have received Fulbright grants for the 2001-2002 school year. Sean Gordon and Nikki Horne will receive the awards, which cover round-trip travel, health insurance and living expenses for a year of study overseas. Both will graduate from KU later this month. Gordon, a genetics major from Overland Park, will study in a new international molecular biology program sponsored by the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry and the Georg-August University in Goettingen, Germany. Horne, a psychology major from Lenexa, will use her grant to conduct neuropsychological research at the Centre de Neuropsychologie et du Langage in Paris. Her research focuses on treatment and rehabilitation for patients with multiple sclerosis. The grants are named in honor of J. William Fulbright, a former U.S. senator from Arkansas. __________________________ engineering school: Associate professor named associate engineering dean Associate professor Robert Sorem has been named associate dean of the Kansas University School of Engineering. Sorem has taught mechanical engineering at KU since 1994. He received his bachelor’s degree from KU in 1986, his master’s in 1988 and his doctorate in 1991. He will replace Tom Mulinazzi, who announced in December that he would step down to teach more civil engineering classes. Sorem plans to work alongside Mulinazzi for several months to learn more about the job. Sorem will officially take over the position sometime this summer. The associate dean oversees students’ academic standing, undergraduate recruitment and the admission of freshmen, transfer students and graduate students to the school. __________________________ Fund-raiser: Restaurant’s omelet day to benefit epilepsy alliance First Watch will serve free omelets from 6:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday to raise money for the Alliance for Epilepsy Research. Patrons are encouraged to donate the cost of the omelet to the alliance to help find better treatments and ultimately a cure for epilepsy. The restaurant is at 2540 Iowa. __________________________ Awards: Haskell names its student of the year Haskell Indian Nations University student Toni Tsatoke has been named a recipient of the eighth annual Student of the Year scholarships. To win the award, students must have at least a 3.0 grade-point average and be active in the community. The $1,000 scholarship covers half a year’s tuition at a tribal college. Tsatoke is working toward an associate of arts degree in education and has been involved in organizations such as Miss AIHEC, cheerleading and serving as a Miss Indian USA court member. She is also a former Miss Haskell and reports for the Indian Leader. Scholarships were awarded to tribal college students from 31 tribal colleges in a ceremony at the American Indian Higher Education Consortium’s spring conference.
Review uncovers deficiencies in schools
Oskaloosa district faces conditional accreditation
May 6, 2001
By Joy Ludwig Weak results found by a state review have led to conditional accreditation for two schools in the Oskaloosa school district. Following its Quality Performance Accreditation review in March, school officials recently learned the district’s middle and high schools received conditional accreditation. That means the schools have until the end of the 2001-2002 school year to meet the recommendations of the QPA team to receive full accreditation.
Outdoors for Kids Day scheduled on Sept. 8
May 6, 2001
Getting kids into the outdoors and having fun are the cornerstones of a new program recently announced by the Kansas Wildscape Foundation, a nonprofit foundation focused on providing outdoor recreational opportunities in Kansas.
Killers of sow bear, cubs defy logic
Four Michigan men charged with running wholesale poaching ring
May 6, 2001
There’s a lot of rural poverty in northern Michigan. Some people cite it to justify poaching deer out of season, rationalizing that because they need the deer to feed their families, it’s not really a crime.
Melvern smallmouth marvelous
May 6, 2001
By Ned Kehde On Tuesday and Thursday afternoons this spring, when the sky looked as dreamy and warm as an Albert Bierstadt painting and the wind refrained from howling, a small coterie of fishermen ventured to Melvern Lake to give chase to a smallmouth bass of grand proportions.
Trainer Baffert taunted at Derby
May 6, 2001
You would not believe some of the things people yelled at Bob Baffert. None of them will or can be repeated here. Baffert fired two bullets at the Kentucky Derby and both were blanks. The overwhelming favorite, Point Given, stalled in the stretch and finished fifth.
Celebrities plentiful at trackside
Pitino, Meat Loaf, Kid Rock, Heche create stir at Churchill Downs
May 6, 2001
Few people in a long, long life will witness a sight like Rick Pitino kibitzing with Meat Loaf. Or Bo Derek and “3rd Rock’s” French Stewart posing (together) for the paparazzi. Such is life at the Kentucky Derby, where stars form unlikely constellations. Among the celebrity supernovas was “Friends” star Courteney Cox Arquette.
Sudden fame difficult to handle
Athletes who skip college not prepared for celebrity lifestyle in pro leagues
May 6, 2001
By Bill Mayer Most of you probably never heard of clarinetist Artie Shaw, though you’d be more enriched if you had savored some of his big band stuff like “Frenesi,” “Begin the Beguine” and “Summit Ridge Drive.”
Baxter places 11th
May 6, 2001
Tim Baxter of Lawrence was unable to better his Friday pass of 8.177 seconds when his dragster would not start for Saturday’s qualifying session in the NHRA Federal-Mogul Drag Racing Series at Heartland Park Topeka.
Jayhawks finish fourth
May 6, 2001
Kansas University’s men’s and women’s track teams both finished fourth in their respective fields in a quadrangular here Saturday in the Jayhawks’ final meet before the Big 12 Championships, May 17-20.
KU seniors showcase skills
May 6, 2001
Kansas University’s Kenny Gregory scored 17 points on 8-of-14 shooting to pace the Atlantic team to an 86-81 victory over the Pacific team at the Nike Desert Classic for NBA prospects.
Former KU grid coach undergoes heart surgery
May 6, 2001
Pepper Rodgers, the Washington Redskins’ vice president of football operations, is recovering from triple bypass heart surgery. Rodgers, 68, had the procedure Thursday after doctors discovered a potential blockage during a physical examination the day before.
Lions take two from SM North
May 6, 2001
Lawrence High’s red-hot baseball team swept Shawnee Mission North, 1-0 and 13-3, on Saturday at Ice Field. The Lions, who have won four straight games, received a strong pitching performance from Brandon Bingham in the first game. Bingham allowed four hits. He struck out eight and walked one, improving to 3-1.
hero wanted
May 6, 2001
KU splits pair with Huskers
May 6, 2001
By Chuck Woodling All Megan Urquhart felt she could do was try to dislodge the ball from the catcher’s glove. Instead, the throw struck her, bounced away and two runs scored that enabled Kansas to edge Nebraska, 6-4, and end the Cornhuskers’ 17-game softball win streak on Saturday at Jayhawk Field.
Ripken hopes fans kind to Mussina
May 6, 2001
Cal Ripken hopes the fans at Camden Yards remember Mike Mussina for what he did with the Baltimore Orioles not how he left them. Mussina went 147-81 with Baltimore over 10 seasons before signing as a free agent with the New York Yankees during the offseason.
Rangers show money doesn’t assure success
May 6, 2001
There must have been a party at 245 Park Ave. in Manhattan when news of Johnny Oates’ ahem resignation as Texas Rangers manager broke on Friday. It’s not that the people who work in Major League Baseball’s executive office have anything against Oates, who just so happens to be one of the kindest men in the sport. Surely, no one was happy to see this most decent man get canned.
National League Roundup: Cubs demolish Dodgers, 20-1
Sosa socks 10th home run of season; Tavarez bags victory in return
May 6, 2001
Julian Tavarez had been fined for making anti-gay remarks and served a suspension for his role in a spring training brawl. All he wanted to do Saturday for the first time in a week was put the controversies behind him and pitch for the Chicago Cubs.
American League Roundup: Pettitte stops Birds again
Jeter’s steal of home helps Yankees beat Baltimore
May 6, 2001
Andy Pettitte extended his mastery of the Baltimore Orioles, even though his teammates nearly sabotaged his performance. Pettitte overcame three errors that led to two unearned runs, and Derek Jeter stole home to cap a four-run third inning as the New York Yankees cruised to a 5-2 victory Saturday.
Lakers, Kings open today
May 6, 2001
The Los Angeles Lakers get back to the business of defending their championship today at Staples Center, and forward Rick Fox believes that’s definitely a good thing. “There’s only so much you can talk about,” Fox said Saturday after his team’s final practice in preparation for its second-round playoff series against the Sacramento Kings.
The Motley Fool
May 6, 2001
Name that company Downhill train
AAA Kansas offers tips for saving money by conserving fuel
May 6, 2001
The only way to save money on gasoline is to use less of it, says Cherie Sage of AAA Kansas.
Rochester launches space tourism class
May 6, 2001
College senior Nick Thompson already can picture an engineering career that explores the mechanics of catapulting legions of tourists into outer space. Marketing major Jonathan Raduns dreams of enticing businesses to invest in orbiting science laboratories. Elsa Suarez, who is studying hotel and resort management, spent part of her spring semester pondering ways to make food taste better aboard a space hotel.
Free State’s Virtue, Criswell place second
May 6, 2001
By Steve Rottinghaus Free State High senior diver Jessica Virtue entered the Sunflower League swimming and diving meet Saturday at Knox Natatorium hoping just to crack the top five. She might have underestimated her ability. Virtue finished second with 400.10 points to set a school record for the Firebirds, now in their fourth season.
Thirsting for low prices
Rising gasoline costs drain resources of summer travelers
May 6, 2001
By Mark Fagan Some friends asked David Underwood to steer his 27-foot Tioga motor home across the Ohio River Valley, through Boston and into the billowing mist of Niagara Falls for a monthlong vacation this summer. Then he remembered his 36-gallon gasoline tank.
KU baseball evens series with KSU
May 6, 2001
By Levi Chronister Nearing the end of a disappointing season, Kansas University’s baseball team might have found a bit of a silver lining Saturday night. The Jayhawks defeated Kansas State, 7-3, at Hoglund Ballpark, ending a nine-game home losing streak to the Wildcats and making K-State’s postseason chances a bit dimmer.
Need some color now? Start with a container garden
May 6, 2001
Container gardening is the quickest, simplest way to fill your yard with flowers, colorful foliage and even vegetables, shrubs and trees. A single pot of bright-red geraniums placed close to the house, on a patio or deck, or at an entryway can make a drab space pop with color.
Home run by Brown lifts KC - Royals 12, Twins 10, 12 innings
May 6, 2001
LaTroy Hawkins blew a save for the first time in 24 career chances, and Dee Brown hit a two-run home run in the 12th inning as the Kansas City Royals beat the Minnesota Twins, 12-10, Saturday night.
Evergreen trees pining for care
May 6, 2001
Now that deciduous trees and shrubs have produced their summer cover, the evergreen trees are quickly forgotten. However, one trip through the countryside reminds us that pine trees still need attention.
Whoa! Monarchos blazes to victory
May 6, 2001
As he rode out the stretch atop a beautiful beast that had just carried him to his first Kentucky Derby victory on Saturday, Jorge Chavez stood atop Monarchos and exclaimed, “Whoa, baby!” Whoa, indeed.
Taken to task
Spring’s frenzied pace gives gardeners plenty to do
May 6, 2001
By Carol Boncella Without a doubt, May is one of the busiest times for gardeners in the Midwest. The winds and rains of April have left the soil refreshed and started to slowly stir perennials from their winter slumber.
Life in the fast lane
Intrepid writer speeds around speedway
May 6, 2001
By Andrew Hartsock You’ve probably passed me. I’m not going to say I’m the slowest driver on the roads, but I’m far from the fastest. I’m old-school enough to believe speed limits are more than just recommendations. For reasons more practical than anything, I drive 35 in 35 mph zones and 70 in 70s. I might be the only person ever to have traveled the Autobahn that is Kansas Highway 10 never to have eclipsed the 80-mph barrier.
Luxury train to make final Rockies journey
May 6, 2001
American Orient Express the privately owned luxury train that travels through the Rockies and Yellowstone National Park is calling it quits after this summer due to increased freight traffic between Denver and Salt Lake City.
With these tips families can survive, even enjoy, a trip to Orlando parks
May 6, 2001
In much of the United States, most youngsters wouldn’t let their childhood slip by without trying to persuade their parents to take them to Walt Disney World. This year, we set aside our concern about costs and decided to make the trip. Then came the task of figuring out the logistics for ourselves, our daughters, 10 and 4, our son, 7, and our au pair.
Great Train Robber’ returns to Britain
May 6, 2001
A plane chartered by a British tabloid to fly convicted train robber Ronnie Biggs back home after decades in self-imposed exile landed Saturday in Brazil. Crowds gathered at Rio’s international airport waiting for the “Great Train Robber” to show up. But his lawyer, Wellington Mousinho, said it was unlikely the 71-year-old fugitive would leave Saturday, and did not say when Biggs would depart.
Communities urged to promote elder activity
May 6, 2001
A coalition of health and policy groups is calling for broad efforts to encourage an active lifestyle among people ages 50 and over. “We need fresh ideas and community innovations to help make physical activity a vital part of our lives,” Dr. J. Michael McGinnis of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation said.
Escheats staffers uphold the rules
May 6, 2001
In handwritten ink in oversized ledgers are recorded the names of thousands of people in line to inherit a total of about $6 million from deceased Missourians. In most cases, however, the people have no idea they are due the money much less, that the state keeps meticulous records of such things in the concrete-block basement of an office building.
Nelson-Atkins reopens African galleries
May 6, 2001
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art has overhauled its African art galleries for the first time since the gallery opened in the 1970s. The revamped space showcases more than 65 masterpiece-quality works from the museum’s permanent collection.
World Briefs
May 6, 2001
Guatemala City: Gunmen kill U.S. woman in apparent carjacking Israel: Designer’s clothing a sign of the times
Militant killed
May 6, 2001
A Palestinian militant was shot to death Saturday in front of his 2-year-old niece, who was injured, and Palestinians blamed Israel for the killing. In another West Bank city, Jericho, Israeli soldiers rocketed a Palestinian police base, injuring 17 people.
Macedonia talks war
May 6, 2001
Macedonia’s prime minister said Saturday he plans to ask Parliament to declare a state of war, hours after soldiers hammered ethnic Albanian rebel positions with artillery fire in an escalating offensive.
Waistbands are falling; hemlines are rising
May 6, 2001
The zipper on an average pair of Levi’s jeans is 5 1/2 inches long. The zipper on the midriff-revealing Levi’s Superlows measures about 3 inches. Maggie Winkel, the women’s merchandise manager at Levi’s, sees the resurgence of fashion from the 1960s and ‘70s as a major impetus for the popularity of low-rise pants.
Folk singer to perform at West Side concert
May 6, 2001
Singer-songwriter Jamie Anderson will perform at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Ecumenical Christian Ministries, 1204 Oread Ave. Anderson has appeared at the National Women’s Music Festival and Kerrville Folk Festival and has been a finalist at the Napa Valley Music Festival, South Florida Folk Festival and Mid-Atlantic Song Contest.
Family briefs
May 6, 2001
A bonding thing Apathetic or normal?
Value of tests questioned at universities
May 6, 2001
The quest for a better way to measure student potential has occupied university leaders for generations. When the nation’s first standardized college admissions tests were administered in 1901, they were seen as a way to reduce the influence of family background and wealth on admissions by identifying capable students from across the economic spectrum.
Beadwork helps stitch together life of the Plains Indians
May 6, 2001
By Jan Biles A request from a French museum to borrow and display some beadwork items from Kansas University’s Museum of Anthropology has inspired the KU museum to put the items on display at home. “Plains Indian Beadwork,” about 150 objects representing the beadwork of the Great Plains Indians, will be shown through Aug. 5 at the Museum of Anthropology in Spooner Hall.
Artworks look at ‘sacred sexuality’
Sexually Charged’ exhibit explores sensuality, attitudes
May 6, 2001
By Jan Biles Anna Glynn’s Barbie and Ken photographs are not for little girls. The black-and-white images, part of the upcoming “Sexually Charged” exhibit at Carmesi, 1012 Mass., show the plastic dolls posed in various stages of sexual acts. “They are the Barbie dolls I had as a kid,” Glynn said, explaining how she came to make the photos five years ago.
Schools cited as top priorities
May 6, 2001
Schools and existing neighborhoods top the list of things Douglas County residents want to protect as the Lawrence area grows, according to a new poll. Also high on the list are public safety and affordable housing.
CottonWood Winds to play at winery
May 6, 2001
By Jan Biles A composition by an English teacher and musician living in Sicily will be the centerpiece of the CottonWood Winds’ “Pops at the Winery” concert at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Heimhof Winery near Tonganoxie. Wine tasting begins at 6:30 p.m.
Budget marks launch of tax, spending cuts
May 6, 2001
President Bush and Republicans are itching to declare victory by pushing a 2002 budget through Congress. The measure, however, is just a starting point for what will really happen this year on taxes and spending.
Growth forum seeks residents’ opinions, questions
May 6, 2001
You’re invited to a town-hall style meeting to discuss growth issues from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday at Liberty Hall. The “Finding Common Ground” meeting will let residents express ideas and ask questions of panelists and others in attendance. Dale Goter, of the statewide public television program “Kansas Week,” will be the moderator.
Book briefs
May 6, 2001
Library ceremony honors first recipient of literary prize Nickel goes far in ‘Icons’ series
Jack the Ripper figures into Pitt’s latest case
May 6, 2001
Inspector Thomas Pitt is on the witness stand as Anne Perry opens her latest Victorian mystery novel, “The Whitechapel Conspiracy” (Ballantine, 368 pages, $25). A distinguished soldier is on trial for murdering his friend, and the absence of a motive has everyone on edge. Pitt’s testimony sends the soldier (and his secrets) to the gallows.
New books for the ol’ coffee table
Mothers, baseball and fast cars subjects of latest volumes
May 6, 2001
For “Hollywood Moms” (Abrams, 112 pages, $29.95), Joyce Ostin photographed 50 of filmland’s female actresses, producers, directors and performers with their mom or daughter. Or with both, as in the case of Carrie Fisher, who wrote the book’s introduction. Many of the black-and-white photos are accompanied by quotations.
Semiretired couple find living a bit easier
May 6, 2001
By Theresa Freed Too little time and too much stress aren’t problems unique to today’s young couples. “As if no one from any other generation got stressed out about anything,” joked Roger Quakenbush, a semiretired clothing salesman. “You just have to learn to take things as they come and don’t get too wrapped up in problems of the moment.”
New stamp a memorial to veterans
May 6, 2001
The United States’ veterans serve their country in times of war and peace. The U.S. Postal Service has issued a 34-cent, self-adhesive stamp to honor the men and women who have participated in all branches of the armed forces.
Students hope to reap revitalized wetland
Seed effort aims to expand habitats, ease drainage
May 6, 2001
By Tim Carpenter Fifth-graders from Hillcrest School slogged through mud Friday to plant the seeds of a new wetland. Colleen McDonald, Roseann Mabitazan and 60 other students spent the morning spreading seed from dozens of native species across a 4-acre wetland reclamation site north of Lawrence. The land, bordered by a creek and woodland, is administered by Kansas Biological Survey and owned by Kansas University Endowment Association.
Stewart wins Pontiac 400
Driver nudges Gordon at Virginia track
May 6, 2001
Tony Stewart won stirring duels with Ricky Rudd, Rusty Wallace and Jeff Gordon, taking the lead with 39 laps to go Saturday night and winning the Pontiac Excitement 400. Stewart had a lead of more than a second until Dave Blaney hit the wall in turns 3 and 4 with seven laps to go, bringing out the eighth caution, setting up the rivals for a suspenseful run for the finish.
Employees should take advantage of 401(k)s and do some investing research
May 6, 2001
The 401(k) plan is the best way to invest for retirement, hands down. Right? Well, yes. But there are some serious problems, too. As most people know, the 401(k) allows participants to contribute up to $10,500 a year to a retirement account. Contributions are tax deductible, and tax on profits is deferred until money is withdrawn. Moreover, many employers add money to the employee’s account.
Tax break aims for new utility plants in state
May 6, 2001
By Scott Rothschild Kansas could be in the running for a power plant construction boon, a key lawmaker said Saturday after the House approved a package of utility bills. The measures, which now go to Gov. Bill Graves for consideration, would give utility companies extensive tax breaks to build new electric plants in Kansas.
Hometown honors Navy pilot
Spy-plane aviator insists he’s no hero, but Goodland residents strongly disagree with that assessment
May 6, 2001
Lt. j.g. Jeff Vignery may not consider himself a hero, but most people in his northwest Kansas hometown are quick to disagree. Saturday, about 500 people turned out to honor Vignery at the field house where he played high school basketball and graduated in 1992.
Willie Mays turns 70 today
Flashy Hall of Famer says continued good health is most important to him
May 6, 2001
Willie Mays may be turning 70 today, but he’s not making as big a deal about it as those around him are. “I don’t feel any different,” Mays said this week from Atlantic City, N.J. “That’s just a number to me. As long as I keep my body healthy and enjoy life, I’m looking forward to many more years.”
5-6 Kovels prices
May 6, 2001
Current prices Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in locations because of local economic conditions.
s important
May 6, 2001
J-W Staff Reports Schools and existing neighborhoods top the list of things Douglas County residents want to protect as the Lawrence area grows, according to a new poll.
Nebraska-Kansas softball box One
May 6, 2001
First Game NEBRASKA ab r h bi
2 schools under conditional accreditation hed here
May 6, 2001
jludwig@ljworld.com Weak results found by a state review have led to conditional accreditation for two schools in the Oskaloosa school district.
d
May 6, 2001
Kansas now in the hunt for power plants
Reinhard services
May 6, 2001
Services for Jeffrey Paul Reinhard, 51, Lawrence, will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday at Rumsey-Yost Funeral Home. Cremation is planned. Mr. Reinhard died Thursday, May 3, 2001, at his home.
Blotter
May 6, 2001
Police reports * Lawrence Police arrested and jailed a 39-year-old Lawrence man Friday night on charges of criminal threat, domestic battery and failure to appear. The alleged victim was treated and released by paramedics. Bail has been set at $5,000.
SUN Past growth positive, but future growth problematic
May 6, 2001
rbrack@ljworld.com Enough is enough.
SUL plains indian beadwork
May 6, 2001
Melissa Lacey/Journal-World Photo A VARIETY OF ORNATELY BEADED moccasins are included in the “Plains Indian Beadwork” exhibit at Kansas University’s Museum of Anthropology. The show runs through Aug. 5.
5-6 ARTS Rausch Timeline
May 6, 2001
Here’s a look at the daily lives of Darren and Trena Rausch and their children, Liam, 2, and Onna, 5 months. Darren Rausch
Drew goes zoomzoom
May 6, 2001
ahartsock@ljworld.com You’ve probably passed me.
(breakout box) Gasoline conservation tips
May 6, 2001
The only way to save money on gasoline is to use less of it, says Cherie Sage of AAA Kansas. Among her organization’s tips for reducing fuel use on summer trips: l Slow down. The faster you go, the more gasoline you burn.
Briefcase (additional)
May 6, 2001
EMPLOYMENT Be honest, don’t complain
a stunner
May 6, 2001
jbiles@ljworld.com Kansas University theater professor Marianne Kubik’s academic research into a singular dance form could be dry as a bone, but instead has resulted in an entertaining, probing multimedia work called “The Waltz Project.”
Sunday business briefs
May 6, 2001
Faces and places Karen Schuyler of Astaris is the new president of the Lawrence Junior Achievement board of directors.
Business briefcase for front
May 6, 2001
BRANCHING OUT Consumers uneasy
s column
May 6, 2001
We’ve entered a new age, one where gross is great and the disgusting is downright delightful. One book holds an enviable position in this world of nasty novelties. “Oh Yuck: The Encyclopedia of Everything Nasty” delivers youngsters a dose of bad medicine they can’t get enough of.
SUN CottonWood Winds
May 6, 2001
jbiles@ljworld.com A composition by an English teacher and musician living in Sicily will be the centerpiece of the CottonWood Winds’ “Pops at the Winery” concert at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Heimhof Winery near Tonganoxie. Wine tasting begins at 6:30 p.m.
SUN beadwork box
May 6, 2001
Decorated artifacts What: “Plains Indian Beadwork.”
Bill Mayer Column For Sunday
May 6, 2001
Most of you probably never heard of clarinetist Artie Shaw, though you’d be more enriched if you had savored some of his big band stuff like “Frenesi,” “Begin the Beguine” and “Summit Ridge Drive.” Not only was this super-talented intellectual a musical genius. He also merits recognition as a philosopher — as well as a onetime husband of the incomparable Ava Gardner.
WKD-Lawrence school board agenda for May 7
May 6, 2001
Lawrence school board, 7 p.m. Monday, 110 McDonald Drive. The board will be asked to endorse a five-year plan for improving coordination of special-education programs at all district schools and centers serving students.
Kids Day in Lawrence
May 6, 2001
Getting kids into the outdoors and having fun are the cornerstones of a new program recently announced by the Kansas Wildscape Foundation, a nonprofit foundation focused on providing outdoor recreational opportunities in Kansas. Sept. 8 has been designated as the first annual Outdoors Kansas for Kids Day. Wildscape and its program partners plan to have more than 10,000 Kansas kids hiking, canoeing, fishing, biking, hunting and birdwatching on OK Kids Day at each of Kansas’ 24 state parks, at the facilities of over100 city and county parks, and at numerous private sites throughout the state.
Fishing Report
May 6, 2001
(Latest update in parentheses) CLINTON LAKE (May 1) — Water 63 degrees and 1.5 feet above normal pool. Channel catfish fair on shad sides and guts on flats in main lake, green worms in feeder streams. Crappie fair using minnows and colored jigs at 4-8 feet near deep structure. White bass fair using jigs on dam.
Outdoors briefs
May 6, 2001
Ex-governor to talk to Friends of Kaw
SUN LOYO exhibit
May 6, 2001
jbiles@ljworld.com Organizers of a new juried art exhibit not only hope to benefit a community agency but also hope to promote sales of local artworks.
SUN Sexually charged box
May 6, 2001
Sensual art What: “Sexually Charged.”
SUN LOYO exhibit box
May 6, 2001
Check it out For more information about the “Lawrence Own-Your-Own” art exhibit:
SUN Beadwork exhibit
May 6, 2001
jbiles@ljworld.com A request from a French museum to borrow and display some beadwork items from Kansas University’s Museum of Anthropology has inspired the KU museum to put the items on display at home.
5-6 Bruce column
May 6, 2001
Now that deciduous trees and shrubs have produced their summer cover, the evergreen trees are quickly forgotten. However, one trip through the countryside reminds us that pine trees still need attention. With the arrival of spring comes the time to protect Austrian and ponderosa pines from Sphaeropsis tip blight and Dothistroma needle blight. These two fungal diseases will soon be active and will infect new needles as they emerge.
KU seniors win Fulbright awards
May 6, 2001
HONORS KU seniors win
5-6 Should research into human cloning be banned?
May 6, 2001
Should research into human cloning be banned?
Arts notes
May 6, 2001
Grimes to sign books Festival goes country Vibrations Studio to show works today
Nation Briefs
May 6, 2001
Oklahoma City: Victims’ relatives upset at Vidal inclusion San Francisco: Golden Gate jump nets arrest for MTV star New Jersey: Demonstrators protest killing of motorist
Nation Briefs
May 6, 2001
Texas: Strong storms move through Plains Indiana: Klan cancels event, plans to challenge city New Jersey: Princeton University names female president