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Archive for Thursday, July 23, 1998

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July 23, 1998
The Lawrence City Band was accompanied during its final concert by Guardsmen with Howitzers.
WHAT ARE THE ANNUAL TEXTBOOK FEES FOR LAWRENCE PUBLIC SCHOOLS?
July 23, 1998
Textbook fees are as follows: Kindergartners: $21
PROPERTY TAXES CONTINUE SLIDE
July 23, 1998
The combined mill levy for Lawrence taxpayers weighs in at 98.682, down from 111.194.
7-23-98
July 23, 1998
Gov. Bill Graves has entered the Governor’s Cup 10k run at the Sunflower State Games. Graves will run in the men’s 45-49 age group. Race time is 8 a.m. Sunday at Lone State Lake, 15 miles southwest of Lawrence.
SBC CRACKS DOWN ON CRAMMERS
July 23, 1998
Southwestern Bell said Wednesday it had discontinued billing for 20 telecommunications providers it says are guilty of “cramming” its customers. Cramming, the practice of adding charges to telephone bills for products or services that customers didn’t order or never received, emerged last year. Each month, Southwestern Bell said, thousands of customers ask the firm to intervene on their behalf to resolve cramming disputes.
PORNOGRAPHIC DISCS FOUND IN LAWRENCE YARD
July 23, 1998
A woman mowing a yard found a stack of 19 computer discs under a bush in the 1300 block of Vermont, and police say some of the discs contain images of child pornography. The 35-year-old woman found the discs at 12:30 p.m. Sunday, and turned them over to police because some had “pornographic titles,” Lawrence police spokesman Matt Sarna said.
SEARS ON TRACK TO OPEN IN OCTOBER
July 23, 1998
Lawrence’s first full-size Sears department store has begun hiring and is on track for a mid-October opening. “We’re thrilled to be finally coming to town,” said Jim Mohs, the store’s general manager. “It’s something Sears has been going after for a long time.”
RAIDERS WIN
July 23, 1998
Nick Wilcox just beat Mother Nature in ending Lawrence’s Raiders 12-4 victory over Topeka Post No. 1 Wednesday in the American Legion zone baseball tournament at Ice Field. Wilcox’s single to left scored Jay Brooks, ending the contest in the fifth inning because of the run rule. The final run came as fans sought shelter from heavy rains that threatened to end the game early.
GARRETT WILLIS OF KNOXVILLE, TENN., SHOT A 6-UNDER-PAR 66 WEDNESDAY AT ALVAMAR TO LEAD THE PRAIRIE GOLF TOUR CHAMPIONSHIP BY ONE STROKE OVER CLAY DEVERS.
July 23, 1998
Maybe father doesn’t know best, even if he is a golfer on the PGA Senior Tour. Raymond Floyd Jr. shot a 3-under-par 69 during the first round of the Prairie Golf Tour Championship on Wednesday at Alvamar Golf Club without using the clubs his father, Raymond Floyd, gave him.
IS THERE ANYTHING YOU CAN DO ABOUT COMPANIES THAT ARE BUILDING HOUSES IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD AND INSIST ON STARTING WORK BEFORE 6 A.M.?
July 23, 1998
According to the city ordinance for “excessive noise constituting disturbance of peace,” no. Construction operations are exempt from the noise ordinance, along with alarm systems, emergency vehicles, lawn care equipment, air conditioning systems, church bells and campanile chimes, aircraft and railroads.
HOPKINS, BANDERAS LIVE UP TO LEGEND
July 23, 1998
“The Mask of Zorro” is an enjoyably cartoonish romp, and lead players Antonio Banderas, Catherine Zeta-Jones and Anthony Hopkins exude a wealth of chemistry throughout. Who would have thought it? In “The Mask of Zorro,” which gives moviegoers some of the best merriment of the summer, Anthony Hopkins and Antonio Banderas square off with just as much zip as when Banderas and the impossibly gorgeous Catherine Zeta-Jones go toe-to-toe.
SIGN ON THE DOTTED LINE
July 23, 1998
The main ingredients of a record contract, according to music attorney Steven Nearenberg, include: * A contract is usually exclusive, meaning you can not record for anyone else.
WATERCOLOR AWARDS GO TO LOCAL ARTISTS
July 23, 1998
The watercolor paintings by a Lawrence woman are winning awards across the country. The Kansas Watercolor Society’s Seven-State Exhibition on display through Aug. 30 at the Wichita Art Museum has recognized the paintings of two Lawrence residents with awards.
SHINY STARS COME OUT
July 23, 1998
Who: The Creature Comforts, Glitter Kicks, Reflector. When: Tonight. Doors open at 8 p.m.
NO CATS, BUT THE NEXT CARDTABLE THEATRE SHOW PROMISES LOTS OF LAUGHS
July 23, 1998
There will be no cats. “No singing cats,” Will Averill, one of the founders of Cardtable Theatre, said. “We have absolutely no singing cats.”
BIG BACKYARD BEAT SHOW BR5-49
July 23, 1998
“Big Backyard Beat Show” is the album for naysayers who branded BR5-49 a novelty act cashing in on the retro country resurgence. It’s a record for those who figured the group’s full-length debut, 1996’s “BR5-49,” and its live EP predecessor, “Live at Robert’s,” were the work of a lucky cover band with no identity. Well, take this: “Big Backyard Beat Show” is the ensemble’s defining effort, the adult record if you will. While “BR5-49” and “Live at Robert’s” displayed solid musicianship and an honest reverence for the past, both CDs were caught up in the quirky, aren’t-they-cool media hype stemming from the band’s big break. After all, how many country acts get discovered while singing Hank Williams tunes at a downtown Nashville bar-clothing store called Robert’s Western World? Now it’s time for the music to speak. And it does. Loudly. Comprising largely originals and a few well-chosen covers (particularly Buck Owens’ shuffling “There Goes My Love” and Billy Joe Shaver’s kicking “Georgia on a Fast Train”), “Backyard” is a muscular, well-executed collection of country, rockabilly and even a Tex-Mex ballad, “Goodbye, Maria,” thrown in for good measure. Among the highlights: The boogie-woogie swagger of “Out of Habit”; the contemplative mood of the waltzlike “Storybook Endings (If You Stop Believin’)”; and the chugging groove of “18 Wheels and a Crowbar.” Most important, “Backyard” establishes BR5-49 as a timeless entity. Sure, the band’s base is country circa 1960s and it’s made its biggest splash on Americana radio. But with across-the-board praise from folks such as Bob Dylan, the Black Crowes and George Jones, its appeal is unlimited. This is good-time music, pure and simple.
COMPANIES DESIGN ANTI-CRAMMING GUIDELINES
July 23, 1998
A telephone customer whose bill has been “crammed” with unauthorized, misleading or deceptive charges would be able to get the local phone company to remove them under voluntary industry guidelines released Wednesday. At the urging of Federal Communications Commission Chairman Bill Kennard, the local phone industry devised the guidelines for combating the growing problem of unauthorized charges that mysteriously pop up on phone bills.
LOTTERY TICKETS, LIQUOR STOLEN DURING BURGLARY
July 23, 1998
These thieves don’t do anything in moderation, apparently. Someone stole 39 bottles of champagne, cognac, whiskey and other liquor and more than 1,000 scratch-off lottery tickets from Wehner Retail Liquor last week.
S STAINED-GLASS WINDOW SHATTERED FOR THIRD TIME
July 23, 1998
Investigators were unsure Wednesday whether this incident was related to two previous incidents.
KU HIRES DESIGNER FOR DOLE INSTITUTE
July 23, 1998
A Lenexa-based architectural firm has been hired as the designer for Kansas University’s Dole Institute for Public Service and Public Policy.
JOHN SWEIGART
July 23, 1998
Services for John Brundage DeLancey Sweigart, 75, Kansas City, Kan., will be at 10 a.m. Saturday, at Trinity Anglican Church of America, Prairie Village. Burial will be in Memorial Park Cemetery, Lawrence. The Rev. Sweigart died Wednesday, July 22, 1998, at Providence Place, Kansas City, Kan. He was a retired Anglican priest.
HAZEL ILENE CHASE SHORT
July 23, 1998
Services for Hazel Ilene Chase Short, 79, Wellington, Mo., will be at 11 a.m. Saturday at First Baptist Church, Wellington, Mo. Burial will be in Wellington City Cemetery. Mrs. Short died Tuesday, July 21, 1998, at St. Mary’s Hospital.
MOTORISTS LIKE SOUND OF FALLING GAS PRICES
July 23, 1998
Prices should stay low through the summer as weakening demand keeps supplies high.
BENEFITS
July 23, 1998
“Education for the Future” By Tara Eck, 12,
COUNTY CLOSES BOOK ON FLOOD BUYOUT PROGRAM
July 23, 1998
After the flood of 1993, Douglas County Emergency Management approached the owners of 75 to 125 properties affected by the presidentially declared disaster to see if they would be interested in a buyout. One of the main goals: Demolish the structures so fewer people would go through the pain and sorrow of a flood.
ABSENCE
July 23, 1998
Charges against a drive-by shooting victim have been dropped, but the alleged shooter still faces an aggravated battery charge.
IN 1898
July 23, 1998
On July 23, 1898, the Lawrence World, in the wake of a decision to extend high school from 3 to 4 years, continued its criticism of recent educational reforms in the state: “The proposed course of study offered by some committee with responsibility to no one would be all right if the High school ended all. But we have a university for which the state pays a large sum of money and it has some rights that ought to be respected. The course of study which has been published in this paper indicate that the university might as well go out of business. It will be a long time before the High schools of the state adopt this course of study. lt cannot be defended on any ground other than it is the proposition of the school teachers as against the taxpayers.” — Courtesy Watkins Community Museum
HIGH WINDS PREVENT KANU RADIO REPAIRS
July 23, 1998
For weeks, Lawrence’s National Public Radio station has been operating on 10 watts, about as much power as it takes to fire up many a listener’s Mr. Coffee machine. As of Wednesday, many of those hoping for a double dose of “Morning Edition” and French roast were still having to look elsewhere for half of their a.m. perk.
WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE OPEN BASEMENT AT SIXTH AND MONTEREY WAY? IT POSES A HAZARD FOR CHILDREN AND ANIMALS.
July 23, 1998
“The property owner is responsible for any hazard on private property,” said Lynn Goodell, the city’s director of housing and neighborhood development. “Building inspection staff is now working with the owner to eliminate the hazard immediately.”
CARL JOHNSON
July 23, 1998
Services for Carl Johnson, 88, Baldwin, will be at 10 a.m. Friday at Rumsey-Yost Funeral Home. Burial will be at Memorial Park Cemetery. Mr. Johnson died Tuesday, July 21, 1998, at Baldwin Care Center.
TEEN-AGERS VOLUNTEER FOR THE COMMUNITY THROUGH YOUTH UNITED WAY.
July 23, 1998
A recent breakfast menu at the Jubilee Cafe included biscuits and gravy, bacon, sausage, hashed browns and pancakes. Lawrence teen-ager Sadie Caplen, 15, was eager to get out of bed before the sun came up for first crack at the food.
PROUD HISTORY
July 23, 1998
To the editor: What a stunning photo of C.E. “Sonny” Scroggins on the front page of Sunday’s Journal World! The intensity in the eye (do I detect an emotional tear?), the slightly furrowed brow beneath the Civil War kepi, lips clamping cigar, and just enough of Old Glory to let us know he carries Her with pride, combine to tell a great story. And though a picture is worth a thousand words, what a shame that the caption doesn’t mention the Kansas connection to the unveiling of the African-American Civil War Memorial in Washington, D.C., this past weekend.
DEATH
July 23, 1998
The best-selling crime novelist put the hard-sell on his public library audience. With his bald pate, round wire-framed glasses and fierce, tight-lipped glare, James Ellroy looks more like the dour, pitchfork wielding farmer of Grant Wood’s “American Gothic” than the self-proclaimed “Demon Dog” of America Noir.
HAS ALREADY SPUN OFF THREE HIT SINGLES.
July 23, 1998
The Washington Post Washington — After a childhood career in assorted television series that allow the world to watch you grow up, and after a couple of failed records, you hook up with sentient producers who help you find your voice.
GROWING FRUSTRATIONS
July 23, 1998
Next time you grouse about how difficult it is to keep your lawn or garden in good shape, think of the courage and dedication it takes to pursue such a course every day as a farmer. The Journal-World recently has carried a number of articles about various ways to protect lawns, gardens and other vegetation from the ravages of weather, insects, varmints and other villains. Taking care of a cultivated area gets a lot of attention, from many sources, this time of year and with good reason.
AFTER RECENTLY BEING CUT BY THE KANSAS CITY CHIEFS, FORMER KU FOOTBALL PLAYER JIM MOORE IS PONDERING HIS FUTURE.
July 23, 1998
Former Kansas University tight end Jim Moore has gone from hitting the weights to weighing his options for the future. Moore, who played for the Jayhawks in 1993-96, recently was waived by the Kansas City Chiefs after they had signed him during the past offseason.
July 23, 1998
A Lawrence band is teaming up with a Lawrence label, but neither parties are limiting their goals to a local scale.
POETRY BOUNCES IDEAS OFF LITERARY WORKS
July 23, 1998
This poetry was springboarded from a close reading of a classic work of literature, in other words the poets were challenged to convert prose to poetry. The poetry was written by students in Joy Clumsky’s creative writing class at Lawrence High School. The Forgotten Mother
I WAS WONDERING IF YOU COULD SUPPLY THE FREQUENCY THE DOUGLAS COUNTY TORNADO SPOTTERS USE. LISTENING TO THE SPOTTERS AND WATCHING TV NEWSCASTS IS THE ONLY ADVANCE WARNING WE HAVE.
July 23, 1998
The frequency the spotters use is 155.760, said Paula Phillips, director of Douglas County Emergency Management.
SHOW SPOOFS LAWRENCE
July 23, 1998
Summertime is for laughs, and you’ll find them at “The Victor Continental Show: Where the Hell Are the Singing Cats!?,” the latest Card Table Theatre production playing at The Varsity, 1015 Mass. The two-hour show is a series of comedy sketches that spoof all things Lawrence — from downtown to Kansas University to some of our lovable, kooky townsfolk.
THE PRAIRIE ROOM: TASTY FOOD AND QUICK SERVICE
July 23, 1998
Located in Kansas Union, the Kansas University restaurant makes lunch quick, cheap and easy.
HOSPITAL REPORT DISMISSALS
July 23, 1998
Annalise M. Albrecht, Lawrence. Sherry Lynn Reed and baby girl, Lawrence.
LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORT
July 23, 1998
Burglaries and thefts reported * An orange 1982 Oldsmobile Omega sedan was reported stolen from the 2100 block of Clinton Parkway between 11:30 p.m. Monday and 4 p.m. Tuesday. The car was valued at $1,000.
RURAL DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS GET NEW LOOK
July 23, 1998
Rural developments would be playing under a new set of rules, judging by proposed text amendments being studied by the Lawrence-Douglas County Planning Commission.
CONCEPT
July 23, 1998
Rezoning property at Sixth Street and Wakarusa Drive for commercial uses is fine, as long as the details put on paper are deemed acceptable, planning commissioners decided Wednesday.
SIDE
July 23, 1998
The brothers’ current image as a suave duo contrasts sharply with their rough pose as half of the new-jack swing quartet Jodeci, which has been dubbed the “bad boys of R&B.” The Washington Post
KANSAS UNIVERSITY STUDENTS WHO WORK AT THE LIED CENTER BOX OFFICE CAN STUDY IN THEIR FREE TIME AND ALSO GET TO ATTEND THE SHOWS.
July 23, 1998
It seems simple enough: People want tickets, you sell them tickets. The Lied Center Box Office only wishes it were that easy.
?
July 23, 1998
You can write to the actress in care of the Gersh Agency, Box 5617, Beverly Hills, Calif. 90210.
S TENNIS COACH IS JENNY GARRITY, THE SISTER OF JAYHAWK SENIOR NETTER KRIS SELL.
July 23, 1998
Jenny Garrity, the 1998 Atlantic Coast Conference Coach of the Year, has been named women’s tennis coach at Kansas. Garrity, 27 and sister of current KU senior Kris Sell, worked the last five years at her alma mater, North Carolina State. She was the Wolfpack’s head coach the past three seasons.
UTILITIES TRY TO BEAT HEAT
July 23, 1998
A break in a recent heat wave means relief for municipal electric companies and their customers.
JOAQUIN CORTES COMBINES FLAMENCO, THE ANCIENT DANCE OF THE SPANISH GYPSIES, MODERN DANCE AND BALLET IN HIS CHOREOGRAPHY.
July 23, 1998
Associated Press Writer New York — As dance sensation Joaquin Cortes nears the end of his frenetic flamenco performance in “Gipsy Passion,” his face and bare chest dripping with sweat, you can tell he’s on the edge of exhaustion.
LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORT
July 23, 1998
Burglaries and thefts reported * An orange 1982 Oldsmobile Omega sedan was reported stolen from the 2100 block of Clinton Parkway between 11:30 p.m. Monday and 4 p.m. Tuesday. The car was valued at $1,000.
OUR TOWN SPORTS
July 23, 1998
Best Nails Hole-in-One: Bud Best of Lawrence used a wedge to ace the par-3, 119-yard No. 4 hole at the Orchards last week. Witnesses were Larry Holuba, J.D. Moore and Roger Pfeifer. *
LAWRENCE HIGH GRADUATE LEE STEVENS TOTALED 21 HOME RUNS AND 74 RBIS WHILE HITTING .300 FOR TEXAS LAST SEASON, BUT HAS ENDURED A TWO-MONTH SLUMP THIS YEAR.
July 23, 1998
With the dog days of summer quickly descending on American League baseball parks, Lee Stevens would like nothing more than for Texas manager Johnny Oates to throw him a bone. Stevens, a 1986 Lawrence High graduate and first baseman/designated hitter for the AL West-leading Rangers, has seen his playing time dwindle of late in the wake of a loathsome two-month slump. After a stellar 1997 campaign and solid start this spring, Stevens entered this week’s three-game set with Kansas City with just five hits in his last 42 at-bats — a .119 clip over 18 games.
WRITER CHRONICLES KANSAS CITY INSTITUTION
July 23, 1998
“Sanderson’s Lunch” is a tribute to the endurance of a recovering alcoholic, a restaurant and a host of hard-luck characters.
THE SIGNATURE TENANT FOR 52 ACRES NORTHWEST OF SIXTH STREET AND WAKARUSA DRIVE WOULD BE AN EXPANDABLE HEADQUARTERS BUILDING FOR THE WORLD CO., WHICH OWNS THE JOURNAL-WORLD AND SUNFLOWER CABLEVISION. T
July 23, 1998
* Some office and sales operations for the Journal-World. * Office, retail and some television studio operations for Sunflower Cablevision.
LIST
July 23, 1998
The statewide nonprofit corporation wants to alert citizens to historical resources in peril and to remind property owners that they have a responsibility to preserve Kansas history.
SUGGESTED READING
July 23, 1998
To find out more on Fanny Kemble, the following books are recommended sources: * “Fanny Kemble, Leading Lady of the Nineteenth-Century Stage,” by J.C. Furnas.
U.S. MARKETS DRAW FOREIGN FUNDS
July 23, 1998
America’s stock markets are making a gravity-defying run for gain and glory this summer. They have shaken off falling U.S. exports, a spreading strike against General Motors and a continuing wave of job-threatening mergers to post new record highs. Among the explanations for this summer of investor bliss: It pays to have the world’s best-run casino.
SENIOR SERVICES BOARD TO HOLD MEETING
July 23, 1998
Douglas County Senior Services will hold its monthly board of directors meeting at 3 p.m. Thursday at the Lawrence Senior Center, 745 Vermont. The meeting is open to the public.
S 10 MOST ENDANGERED HISTORIC PLACES IN KANSAS:
July 23, 1998
1. The Kansas River. 2. The Bartell House, Junction City.
S ONE-WOMAN SHOW
July 23, 1998
The story of a 19th-century actress and abolitionist will be portrayed by a Lawrence actress.
NEW CLASS COMBINES ARTDESIGN
July 23, 1998
A Lawrence High School Industrial Design will bring student ideas to life.
A LAWRENCE MUSIC LAWYER ADVISES BANDS TO BE TRUE TO THEMSELVES AND TO BE CAUTIOUS WHEN ENTERING THE RECORD INDUSTRY MARKETPLACE.
July 23, 1998
When a band signs to a record label, it can count on at least two things, according to Steve Nearenberg. The label will see a profit before the band does, and the band probably won’t find overnight success. Nearenberg, a Lawrence resident and 1990 Kansas University Law School graduate, practices music law.
U.S. HOUSE CANDIDATE SEEKS RESPECT
July 23, 1998
A self-employed Overland Park businessman is running a low-dollar, high-idea campaign to represent Lawrence in Congress.
MARSHALL ALLEN
July 23, 1998
Services for Marshall Allen, 84, Ottawa, will be at 10 a.m. Friday at Dengel and Son Mortuary, Ottawa. Burial will be in Lane Cemetery, Lane. Mr. Allen died Monday, July 20, 1998, at Ransom Memorial Hospital, Ottawa.