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Archive for Monday, July 1, 1996

Also from July 1

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KENNETH WHITE
July 1, 1996
Services will be held later for Kenneth Steele White, 73, Lawrence. Mr. White died Saturday, June 29, 1996, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
TRAILS CONFERENCE SCHEDULED FOR SEPTEMBER
July 1, 1996
The Glacial Hills Resource Conservation and Development Council will sponsor the first Kansas State Trails Conference Sept. 6 and 7 at Haskell Indian Nations University. The conference will help recreational enthusiasts and trail developers better understand the importance of trail development and the issues surrounding them.
S DOWNTOWN PLAN
July 1, 1996
Richard Gwin/Journal-World Photo The Winter block — property bordered by Seventh, Eighth, New Hampshire and Rhode Island streets — is targeted for demolition to make way for new commercial, residential and office development. Borders, a national bookstore, music and cafe chain, wants to locate a store at the northwest corner of the block, at Seventh and New Hampshire streets. Wint Winter Jr., a Lawrence attorney whose family owns the property, said he was “90 percent complete” on a deal to bring an unnamed national retailer to the property. The southwest corner of the property, at Eighth and New Hampshire, would feature mixed uses that likely would include a restaurant, Winter said. The property’s owners, known as Winter Inc., filed an application Wednesday for a demolition permit. The application is scheduled to be reviewed July 18 by the city’s Historic Resources Commission. Site plans for the project are expected within two weeks. Tuesday night, Lawrence city commissioners will review early work on a redevelopment plan for downtown properties. Mayor John Nalbandian said the plan was intended to give officials guidance on projects that include requests for spending tax money. Winter’s doesn’t. “I think it’d be hard for us to say no, you can’t do this,” Nalbandian said. “In my personal opinion, any downtown plan that we come up with should be able to accommodate a project like this.” Tuesday’s city commission meeting begins at 6:35 p.m. at city hall, Sixth and Massachusetts.
LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORT
July 1, 1996
Burglaries and thefts reported * A compound saw, air compressor and various items valued together at $2,182 were taken between 5:30 p.m. Thursday and 7 a.m. Friday from the 800 block of Westgate, Lawrence police reported.
WHAT IS AUTISM
July 1, 1996
Autism is a developmental disability, first described in 1943. It is not a mental illness, although some autistics are also mentally retarded.
WATERING HOLES
July 1, 1996
Word of mouth links unlikely Ask the longtime residents of a college town what you ought to see, and they’ll recommend a range of possibilities from the art gallery to the natural history museum, the arboretum, the great new restaurant, and so on. Ask a few students, however, and the choice narrows.
HOSPITAL REPORT
July 1, 1996
Births Katy and Russell Ingel, Lawrence, a girl, Sunday.
TRIATHLETE VIFIAN VICTORIOUS
July 1, 1996
Many of the professional triathletes competing in the Lawrence Memorial Hospital Triathlon at Lone Star Lake for the first time on Sunday couldn’t get over the event’s home-grown feeling. That goes double for Marcel Vifian.
WOODARD IS STILL IN THE GAME
July 1, 1996
Former KU women’s basketball player Lynette Woodard is playing the stock market game.
MCLOUTH WILL HOST ANNUAL THRESHING BEE
July 1, 1996
The 39th annual Steam Engine Show and Threshing Bee Reunion will be held Aug. 2-4 in McLouth. Steam engines, gas tractors, antique automobiles and trucks and antique aircraft will be on display.
SOUND OFF
July 1, 1996
What is Kansas’ most abundant mineral? Salt.
KU SIGNEE COLLECTED $695,000
July 1, 1996
Notes and quotes while hoping everyone enjoys a happy and prosperous fiscal new year … Damian Rolls, the Kansas City Schlagle infielder who rejected a Kansas baseball scholarship after being selected in the first round of the June draft by the Los Angeles Dodgers, has been assigned to Yakima, Wash. The Dodgers lured Rolls away from KU with a $695,000 signing bonus. Did you realize that if the Dodgers traded for Cardinals’ shortstop Royce Clayton they might one day have a Rolls and a Royce? …
NO BUDGET FREEDOM
July 1, 1996
City Manager Mike Wildgen’s recommendations for spending some of the city’s alcohol-tax revenues next year:
LISTENING SKILLS TURN INTO TOOL OF COMPASSION
July 1, 1996
The telephone rings loudly with impact on the first floor of this old, three-story house at 1419 Mass. Shervin Hashemy, a Headquarters volunteer, calmly picks up the phone and says, “Hello, Headquarters.” The caller is a woman threatening to commit suicide. Hashemy continues the scene, which occurred recently. “She was pretty hurt and scared of even thinking about suicide,” Hashemy said. “I just tried to be inviting and there for her. You can’t cheer up anybody, because if you’re down, that’s not what’s going to help you or feel supportive to you. People know what’s best for their situation. Sometimes they just need somebody to talk to and be there for them.” About two hours later, he heard from the woman again.
SEAT BELT USE CLIMBS WITH LAW
July 1, 1996
Only one in 10 people wore seat belts when a law requiring them in Kansas was passed. Today, more than five of 10 use them.
SOUND OFF
July 1, 1996
Any word on when “Mission: Impossible” will be coming to TV? ABC reportedly will pay as much as $20 million for a 1998 network debut of the spy adventure “Mission: Impossible,” starring Tom Cruise, according to the trade paper Daily Variety. Cruise, who turns 34 on Wednesday, co-produced the film.
SOUND OFF
July 1, 1996
What is a kangaroo rat and where does it live? The kangaroo rat lives in deserts. Measuring about 15 inches in length, the animal is so well-adapted to its dry surroundings that it does not need to drink water. Its front legs are short, and it has a large head and big eyes. Like a kangaroo, its powerful hind legs enable it to make powerful leaps.
STABBING
July 1, 1996
An 18-year-old Lawrence woman was arrested in connection with the stabbing of her sister late Saturday night, police said. A 20-year-old Lawrence woman was treated at Lawrence Memorial Hospital late Saturday night for a stab wound and released, authorities said.
CURB REPAIRS COULD BLOCK TRAFFIC
July 1, 1996
Watch out this week for crews replacing curbs along three streets south of Kansas University’s main campus. Vicki Cummiskey, the city’s communication coordinator, said curb-replacement projects were scheduled to begin Monday in the following areas:
PETTENGILL SERVICES
July 1, 1996
Services for Nathan W. Pettengill, 88, Lawrence, will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Rumsey-Yost Funeral Home. Burial will be at Memorial Park Cemetery. Mr. Pettengill died Saturday, June 29, 1996, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
SURVEY
July 1, 1996
Kansas is 26th in a new ranking of the most dangerous states.
LHS STUDENTS PLACE AT NATIONAL TOURNAMENT
July 1, 1996
Three Lawrence High School students competed last week in the National Forensics League National Speech and Debate Tournament in Fayetteville, N.C. All three students made it to the elimination rounds in their events.
SOURCE MATTERS NOT IN MUTUAL FUND RISK
July 1, 1996
Mutual funds, whether bought through brokerage firms or banking establishments, carry the same amount of risk.
ARSON SUSPECTED IN FAIRGROUNDS FIRE
July 1, 1996
A small trash fire Saturday night outside a Douglas County 4-H Fairgrounds livestock building led to a report of attempted arson, the Douglas County Sheriff’s Department reported Sunday. No arrests have been made in the blaze, which caused little damage and no injuries.
SOUND OFF
July 1, 1996
Does the Lawrence Arts Center’s director support taking Percent for Art money away from local artists to fund the arts center expansion? “No,” said Ann Evans, director of the arts center. “The Percent for Art was established to provide support for artists and artwork for public buildings.”
SOUND OFF
July 1, 1996
My friend and I were talking the other day, and somehow the Teapot Dome Scandal came up in conversation. What, exactly, caused the scandal? According to The New American Desk Encyclopedia, the Teapot Dome Scandal involved government malpractice during President Harding’s administration.