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Archive for Saturday, August 15, 1992

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$1.49 FOR KINDERGARTEN?
August 15, 1992
People trying to get their youngsters ready to enter school for the fall term are likely to sigh plaintively at a “40 years ago” item in the Journal-World’s Old Home Town column. It reads: “City and county schools were trying to cut parents’ expenses with wider use of library books to minimize personal book purchases. The cost per pupil for kindergarten supplies was running $1.49. By the fifth grade, the cost had risen to about $14 each.”
ASKED AND ANSWERED
August 15, 1992
Questions about marital infidelity posed to both presidential candidates in recent months have some U.S. voters begging for a television show attorney to rise and say “Objection! The question has been asked and answered.” The idea is that the opposing attorney should quit badgering the witness about a question to which he or she has already responded. In other words, it’s time for the interrogator to move on to another subject.
HEARING SCHEDULED ON MURDER CHARGE
August 15, 1992
A 27-year-old man who was captured last spring in New York City on charges stemming from the 1989 murder of a 25-year-old Lawrence woman made a first appearance Thursday in Douglas County District Court. District Judge Jean Shepherd set a preliminary hearing for Monday for Tyrone Walker, who is charged with first-degree murder in the Oct. 31 or Nov. 1, 1989, death of Tamara C. Baker.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
In an effort to encourage young readers, a Kansas University professor is writing a book to help teachers make the most effective use of young adult literature. John H. Bushman, a professor in the School of Education’s curriculum and instruction department with an emphasis in English education, is completing “Using Young Adult Literature in the English Classroom,” which is due out in October. His wife, Kay Parks Bushman, an English teacher at Ottawa High School in Ottawa and instructor of the undergraduate young adult literature course at KU, is collaborating on the book.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
During his career, Thomas B. Allen has published his illustrations in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Sports Illustrated, Life, Time and others. But these days, he focuses on a much younger audience. Allen now works on children’s books. His first came in 1987: “In Coal Country,” which was written by Judith Hendershot, earned several awards. It’s what comes naturally.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
The word is out: If you want data on Kansas or its cities and counties, the Institute for Public Policy and Business Research is the place to call. Last year, the center’s librarian alone fielded 954 requests for information, said Tony Redwood, IPPBR’s executive director.
EDITSATURDAY COLUMN
August 15, 1992
Kansas University is about to begin its 127th academic year; final figures have been released concerning the highly successful $265 million Campaign Kansas capital fund drive to help improve the overall excellence of the university; the latest edition of the nationally known and respected guide to U.S. colleges and universities edited by former New York Times Education Editor Edward Fiske has just been released, and KU is ranked among the nation’s highest group of state universities; and more than 200 area residents gathered Thursday evening as part of a program to help develop the Horizon 2020 guide for future growth and development of Lawrence and Douglas County. Those attending this meeting were asked to describe what they consider the ideal town, ideal job, ideal industry for the city, and their vision of Lawrence’s future.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
The profound changes in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe have meant changes in Kansas University’s program that studies the history, culture and languages of that region of the world. First came the name change.
OWEN SERVICES
August 15, 1992
Services for Richard F. Owen, 40, Lenexa, will be at 2 p.m. Monday at Trinity Episcopal Church, 1011 Vt., with the Rev. John Macauley officiating. Burial will be in Memorial Park Cemetery. Mr. Owen died of natural causes Thursday, Aug. 13, 1992, at Humana Hospital, Overland Park.
G. VIRGINIA GIBSON
August 15, 1992
G. Virginia Gibson, 90, Lawrence, died July 28, 1992, at Colonial Manor in Lawrence. Inurnment will be in Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Ky. No services were planned.
FERN MIDDLEBUSHER
August 15, 1992
Services for Fern Middlebusher, 82, Olathe, will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Dengel & Son Mortuary in Ottawa. The Rev. Willard Neuman will officiate. Burial will be in Lincoln Cemetery near Lebo. Mrs. Middlebusher died Friday, Aug. 14, 1992, at Royal Terrace Care Center in Olathe.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
At a time of dwindling resources for many state universities, students and faculty of Kansas University’s School of Social Welfare are leaving the classroom for research and a hands-on education in social work. “What we’ve been most interested in is anchoring the school more firmly in the community,” said Ann Weick, KU’s dean of social welfare. “We believe we have the obligation to share the knowledge we have and to help other service agencies.”
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
A $92,000 grant from the National Science Foundation is helping fossil researchers at Kansas University and around the world embark on a scientific project that will give them a better understanding of life on Earth and patterns of extinction. “This is one of the most ambitious projects in science,” said Roger Kaesler, director of the KU Paleontological Institute, which received the NSF grant earlier this year. “I can’t think of any that are larger in scope.”
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Hiring more faculty and providing the latest technologies for labs are two top priorities of Kansas University’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences as officials scrutinize all department programs and goals. The university is in the midst of a review of all its academic programs, mandated by the Kansas Board of Regents.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
The mission of Kansas University’s new multicultural center will become focused this fall when a committee is formed to decide everything from a schedule of events to whether the building will be named. Sherwood Thompson, director of KU’s Office of Minority Affairs and chairman of the multicultural center’s committee, said he’s looking forward to a collecting a variety of ideas that would make the center a unique focal point of multicultural academic and social interaction on campus.
KU PLAYERS WALKED AWAY FROM WRECK
August 15, 1992
Kansas defensive linemen Kyle Moore and Gilbert Brown walked away from what easily could have been a tragedy on Tuesday and practiced with the Jayhawks on Friday. On their way from Detroit back to Lawrence, the pair were involved in a one-car accident in Chicago when Brown fell asleep at the wheel of his pickup.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
In an effort to encourage young readers, a Kansas University professor is writing a book to help teachers make the most effective use of young adult literature. John H. Bushman, professor in the education school’s curriculum and instruction department with emphasis in English education, is completing “Using Young Adult Literature in the English Classroom,” which is due out in October. Co-authoring the book is his wife, Kay Parks Bushman, an English teacher at Ottawa High School in Ottawa and instructor of the undergraduate young adult literature course at KU. She also is president of the national organization, Assembly of Literature for Adolescents National Council of Teachers of English (ALAN).
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
While walking through the halls of Kansas University’s Haworth Hall, many students pass by a room unaware that it may hold the secret to surviving biology. The Biology Teaching Resource Center, which first opened in 1980 at Snow Hall and moved to 1004 Haworth in 1985, is an ever-growing facility equipped with a variety of audio-visual and written materials designed to help biology students and instructors.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
The chief academic administrator at Kansas University has concentrated this year on a complex review of the university’s academic programs to identify areas of excellence. “It’s occupied a lot of our attention and time this past year,” said Del Brinkman, vice chancellor for academic affairs. “We’re looking at everything the university does and determining how central these things are to our overall mission, how cost effective they are and how the quality is.
REMEMBERING MUNICH MASSACRE
August 15, 1992
Why didn’t Germans let Israeli Mossad take immediate charge? NBC’s recent television special on the Munich Massacre at the 1972 Olympic Games caused me to focus on three items: (1) The disgustingly poor handling of the incident by the Germans; (2) the way the Munich experience changed cities’ preparations for the Olympics; (3) the enormous costs required for security against blood-lusting hell-raisers.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Occupants of Kansas University’s newest home for students say they’re the objects of some good-natured razzing. Amini Scholarship Hall is getting its first residents this weekend and the word is out that Amini is “luxury” housing.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
The new dean of the School of Allied Health at the Kansas University Medical Center in Kansas City, Kan., said she intends to foster a sense of teamwork among the school’s programs and encourage faculty research during the coming year. Lydia Wingate took over the helm in February after James Cooney left to head the allied health school at Georgia State University. She moved to Kansas from Boston, where she was director of post-professional programs and an epidemiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital.
DISABLED WOMAN TO LIVE ON HER OWN
August 15, 1992
What could have been a protest Friday turned into a victory rally when a local group learned that a woman with a disability would be allowed to move out of a nursing home. “I’m glad to be free,” Wylma Mortell said at the rally.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Sometime during the last 20 years, Abraham Lincoln fell off his pedestal as the venerable abolitionist and broke in two. In a book he hopes to finish this spring, Kansas University history professor Phil Paludan plans to stitch Lincoln back together again.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Kansas University researcher Charles Wood is studying a cattle virus, similar to human AIDS, that causes immune system disorders. The virus, called bovine immunodeficiency virus or BIV, only affects cattle and is not as lethal as the human virus. But because of the importance of cattle to the Midwest, BIV could be of economic importance, said Charles Wood, an associate professor of microbiology.
DR. RICHARD ROBERTS
August 15, 1992
Funeral services for Dr. Richard S. “Dick” Roberts, 73, Lawrence, are pending at Warren-McElwain Mortuary. Dr. Roberts died today, Aug. 15, 1992, at his home. He had cancer.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Kansas University’s department of educational services covers a lot of ground when it comes to meeting the needs of prospective, current and former students. W. Wes Williams, dean, explained that educational services encompasses eight offices all geared toward serving students. They range from the office of admissions to the office of new student orientation to the office of the registrar.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
While changes in the European political landscape have somewhat strained Kansas University’s relations with Yugoslavia, they have opened up new opportunities with Ukraine, says George Woodyard, KU’s dean of international studies and programs. Woodyard said the breakup of the Soviet Union has allowed KU to develop a new relationship with Ivan Franko University in L’viv, Ukraine.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Kansas University physicist Kai-Wai “Ken” Wong made headlines in November 1990 when he announced that he and fellow researchers had identified the fundamental structure of a wide range of superconductors, materials that conduct electricity without energy loss. Two years later, a Lawrence firm is carrying Wong’s research to another stage by striving to develop commercial applications related to his work. The firm, Midwest Superconductivity Inc., already has met with success, helping KU and three partner universities receive a patent on a superconducting material last October.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
About 150 students took a golden opportunity last year to help people get where they wanted to go at least those people looking for their seats in Kansas University’s Crafton-Preyer Theatre or Liberty Hall. These students were part of the Ambassador program, operated out of the Murphy Hall Box Office. These volunteers don white shirts and red bow ties and assist patrons of Concert Series and University Theatre events in finding seats, getting programs and figuring out where the bathrooms are. In exchange for these services, the ushers get a free seat to a performance depending on availability.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
John Hoopes, an assistant professor of anthropology at Kansas University, made a pretty big archaeological find in Costa Rica a couple of years ago. The sites he discovered are so rich with artifacts that they kept 16 KU students busy last spring and are guaranteed to keep archaeologists busy for some time to come. Hoopes said the discovery could result in a better understanding of the ecological impact of ancient cultures, as well as increased tourism for Costa Rica and a better understanding among natives in the region of how their predecessors lived.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Kansas University’s School of Education has been lauded for such things as its five-year teacher training program, its doctoral program in special education and the high caliber of students it attracts. However, says Acting Dean Richard Whelan, the school didn’t get to be one of the top institutions in the country simply by resting on its laurels, and Whelan thinks the school will benefit from a review of all academic programs under way at all state universities.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Kansas University architects and planners are scrambling to keep up with the hurly-burly pace of progress on nearly $100 million in KU construction projects. Allen Wiechert, KU director of facilities planning, said the high-dollar projects on the Lawrence campus are the $18 million reconstruction of Hoch Auditorium and the $14.3 million Lied Center for the Performing Arts.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Part-time Kansas University students in the Kansas City area will begin taking classes at the new high-tech Regents Center in January. KU has operated the Regents Center in an old elementary school in Overland Park since 1975, but the building never suited KU’s needs.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
As he looks forward to the coming year, Bob Jerry says there’s plenty of evidence that Kansas University’s School of Law is on solid footing. Jerry, who is beginning his fourth year as dean of the school, said that for the past three years the academic credentials of entering law students have been the strongest in the school’s history.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Everyone loves being involved in a success story, and the five presidents of the Kansas University Alumni Association who held office during Campaign Kansas are no exception. The fund drive, which began in July 1987, ended this summer by generating $262.9 million in donations for the university. The program was so successful that the original $150 million goal was reset and the second goal of $177 million was surpassed with $85.8 million to spare. Campaign Kansas finished as the most successful university drive in state history.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Campaign Kansas, Kansas University’s major fund-raising drive that concluded this summer, raised a total of $262.9 million. In preparation for the drive, university leaders, under the direction of Chancellor Gene A. Budig, identified nine general areas in which private funding could make the greatest impact on quality.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Behind the concerts, comedy acts, movies, trips and forums put on by Student Union Activities are 12 students who literally run the show. SUA’s student president, vice presidents and committee coordinators volunteer as many as 40 hours each week planning, negotiating and directing events targeted for student entertainment. This year’s SUA president is Todd Hatton.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Only a fraction of Kansas University students sign up for law classes. But that doesn’t mean students won’t get an introduction to the subject when they hit the Hill, says Jo Hardesty, director of KU’s Legal Services for Students office. “When they come here, a lease may be the first contract they’ve ever signed,” Hardesty said. “They don’t really realize it, but the law is everywhere.”
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
As the new president of the Kansas University Endowment Association, Jim Martin says the organization can’t rest on its record of success. “It would be a mistake to maintain the status quo, although by any measure the association has done very well over the past 100 years,” said Martin, who was named president of the endowment association in October 1991. Martin took over after the retirement of Todd Seymour, who worked for the association for 32 years and was president from 1974-1991.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
William Hougland helped lead the 1952 Kansas University basketball team to a national and Olympic championship and the 1956 U.S. Olympic team to a gold medal. As the first chairman of the board of directors of the KU Alumni Association, Hougland wants to move his alma mater’s 46,000-member alumni group to the top.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
The “freedom thing” in college tends to go a little too far for some students who have a less than ideal grades. Just ask Kent McAnally, a doctoral student who maintains a 3.99 grade-point average after two years of graduate school at Kansas University.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
As Chancellor Gene Budig sees it, two milestones at Kansas University clearly demonstrate how money can make a difference in the quality of higher education. In May, the state handed KU $18 million to rebuild Hoch Auditorium, a cherished landmark gutted by fire in 1991. Without it, Hoch could have sat empty for years and KU would have been without an important classroom facility.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
The joke in the halls of Kansas University’s public administration department is you need a master’s degree in public administration just to be a meter reader in Lawrence. That’s because sections of the department’s directory of graduates read like a “Who’s Who” of Lawrence city government, past and present.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Even if the cost of your tuition and books is covered, campus living isn’t cheap. For many Kansas University students whether they’re helping foot the bill for their living expenses or just want some extra pocket change to plug into residence hall vending machines or pay for a night on the town part-time employment is part of their college experience.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
When Jenny Reardon is not in a biology laboratory separating DNA strands as part of her genetic research, you might find her out riding a mountain bike. “Academics are important, but it’s very important to focus on other things,” she says. “If you focus on academics too much you’ll burn out.”
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Ever wanted to be in the military? Are you a good student, but don’t have the money to pay for your education at Kansas University? Do you want a college experience that is different? If so, you may want to consider the Reserve Officers Training Corps, the U.S. armed forces’ program that combines a college education, scholarships, and a taste of military life.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Kansas University’s Robinson Center is similar to a health club except for one thing KU students, faculty and staff get to use the facility for the low, low cost of free. “It’s very much like a YMCA,” said Allan Heinze, facilities director for Robinson Center. “But we are an educational facility first. That’s our first priority. Then we are a recreational facility.”
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Like most birds, Jayhawks usually find a permanent place to roost. However, every year several hundred Jayhawks travel in flocks to destinations as distant and diverse as China, the Danube River, Costa Rica and San Francisco. The trips are made possible through the Kansas University Alumni Association’s Flying Jayhawks program, which arranges special travel packages for KU alumni.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Success with tests is critical to getting good grades. But test success isn’t just a matter of knowing the subject matter covered on the exam. It’s also important to know how the exam will be conducted, says a Kansas University geology student who carries a 4.0 grade-point average. “Be familiar with how the instructor tests,” says Dean Keiswetter, a 26-year-old doctoral student who finished his master’s degree this spring with a 4.0 GPA.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Cliff Klaven, one of the characters featured on the television program “Cheers,” seems to know everything. In that regard, there is a Cliff Klaven at Kansas University at least the KU Information Center, which serves as the university’s source of general and specific information. Anyone can call KU Information and have just about any question answered from 7 a.m. to 2 a.m. The number to call is 864-3506.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
The Kansas University Alumni Association has scheduled a pair of events next spring, one aimed at those who are graduating from KU this year and one for those who have already graduated. The morning of commencement, the alumni association will host a breakfast for graduating seniors and their families at the Adams Alumni Center, 1266 Oread Ave.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Since learning represents an unending process, Kansas University’s Division of Continuing Education offers almost endless possibilities for people outside the campus setting. Through short courses, seminars and conferences offered on and off campus, continuing education fulfills what Dean Robert Senecal calls its mission to extend the university’s teaching and research “to audiences that don’t traditionally come to the campus for formal education.”
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Students looking for a way to get involved at Kansas University and learn about their school’s history can join the Student Alumni Association. The organization, which connects current students with the KU Alumni Association and also teaches students about their university, is open to any KU student, said Jodi Breckenridge, adviser to the student group.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Ali Nourbakhsh, a 19-year-old Kansas University sophomore, says beware of the party. There are times, he says, that study has to come first. “There’s only so much you can cram into your mind,” before a big exam, he said. “The less social events you can go to, the better off you’ll be.” Nourbakhsh, who has a 4.0 grade-point average in engineering, came with his family to the U.S. from Iran in 1976 and graduated from Lawrence High School. At KU, he has been a star performer in the classroom.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Brochures for the Kansas University study abroad programs claim, “Far Away Places Are Closer Than You Think!” And the study abroad office currently is developing several new programs to get the word out.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
As a White House fellow during the height of the Vietnam War, Deanell Tacha found herself in Southeast Asia and longing for familiar surroundings. “While checking into a Bali hotel in the middle of the night I saw a Jayhawk in the window. It was a tie to home that made me cry,” said the 1968 Kansas University graduate.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
A primary activity for the School of Pharmacy at Kansas University this year will be to find a new dean. For the second straight year, Ronald Borchardt will serve as acting dean, assisted by Jeremy Matchett. The two professors are filling in after former Dean Howard Mossberg moved over to the job of vice chancellor for research, graduate studies and public service. Mossberg will return to the school as a faculty member next year.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
You see ‘em on the court. You see ‘em on the field. And they’re always cheering on those Kansas University Jayhawks. But these days, there’s no telling where else the Jayhawk mascots are going to show up.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
High schools commonly recognize the achievements of their athletes with an awards banquet, but academically successful students outside the athletic arena might not always get the pat on the back they deserve. That was the idea that led to the formation of the Kansas University Alumni Association’s Kansas Honors Program, which annually honors the state’s top high school seniors.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Students attending Kansas University this fall will get the first glimpse of the Kansas Union’s new look, a look resulting from a $4 million renovation project. But while the union’s appearance will change, its purpose will not, said Jim Long, union director.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Interested in making a career change? Or have you had to re-locate because your spouse’s company has moved? The Kansas University Alumni Association might be able to help you find a new job with a new placement network.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Kansas University students don’t just stay on campus to get involved. Students, says the director of a local volunteer center, make up a significant percentage of the number of people who volunteer to help out at various social service agencies in Lawrence.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
The Hoch Auditorium fire last summer at Kansas University provided an unexpected opportunity for Historic Mount Oread Fund members to broaden their role in campus preservation efforts and to renew their dedication to the group’s purpose. Money has been earmarked for rebuilding Hoch, and its facade will be preserved. Now, fund members are focusing their attention on another historic campus building, Spooner Hall.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
With more than 100 majors to pick from at Kansas University, it’s not surprising that some students may have trouble deciding on a field of study. And as students advance through KU and learn more about their likes and dislikes, it’s not uncommon for them to change their minds and their majors.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Stretched to the limit. Absolutely full. Bursting at the seams. Pick one of the above phrases and you’ll have an accurate description of the enrollment picture at the Kansas University Medical Center’s School of Nursing in Kansas City, Kan.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
When classes start at Kansas University this fall, a new program aimed at preparing minority undergraduate students for graduate studies will be in full swing. The Dean’s Scholars Program pairs faculty mentors with minority undergraduates from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who are interested in pursuing advanced degrees in hopes of teaching.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Question: What’s 25 years old, white, female, single, hails from Johnson County, lives off campus and is enrolled in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences? Answer: The average Kansas University student, according to data compiled by KU’s Office of Institutional Research and Planning and reported in the January 1992 edition of “University of Kansas Profiles.”
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Although it may seem ironic that only about half the students who belong to a Kansas University entrepreneurs group are business majors, Curtis Marsh says that’s the way it’s supposed to be. Marsh, a KU senior and immediate past president of the KU chapter of the Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs, said ACE is designed to provide information about starting a business or marketing an idea to students who don’t have business know-how.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Kansas University Chancellor Gene Budig enters a new year as head of the state’s largest university more concerned than ever about the rising cost of higher education. “The cost of education, without question, will be the burning issue in the 1990s, one that will spur heated debate,” he said. “There is no doubt that the weak economy is forcing growing numbers of promising students to forego the college experience.”
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
A clearer, crisper chime from the bells in the World War II Memorial Campanile is still months away for Kansas University carillonneur Albert Gerken. Restoration of the 42-year-old carillon in the campanile will be delayed one year, said Don Whipple, assistant director with KU’s office of facilities planning.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Before the sun rises each weekday this fall, more than 30 silhouetted figures will march through Lawrence’s Burcham Park carrying their boats to the Kansas River. “Six o’clock’s early,” Rob Catloth, KU crew coach, said. “But it’s the varsity rowers that go in the morning. To be in those first boats they have to be dedicated.”
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
The demand to live in Kansas University scholarship halls continues to be high, despite the addition of a new men’s scholarship hall opening this fall. “We have large waiting lists for both women and men,” said Dennis Enslinger, acting assistant director of student housing system contracts.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
As the new chair of the nine-member Kansas Board of Regents, Shirley Palmer says the ongoing analysis of the mission, role and scope of the state’s six regents’ universities heads her list of board priorities. “The purpose isn’t to create a lot of paperwork. The purpose is to improve the system,” said Palmer, of Fort Scott.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Hundreds of parents are getting a taste of college life this weekend at least the part about moving in. For some, that means the aches and pains of helping sons and daughters get set up in a Kansas University residence hall.
S HEART IS
August 15, 1992
Chris Davis will be attending school and playing basketball at Pensacola, Fla., Junior College, but his heart is still at Kansas University. Davis, a Kansas basketball signee who failed to qualify academically under NCAA guidelines, decided Friday to attend Pensacola JC rather than pay his own way and sit out a year at KU.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
A Kansas University researcher who has studied AIDS for nearly 10 years says society may have to redefine its definition of a cure when it comes to the disease. Charles Wood, KU associate professor of microbiology, said that because scientists have been unable to come up with a drug or a regimen to treat the disease, the best way to eliminate the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome is for individuals to prevent themselves from contracting and spreading it.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Higher-than-expected enrollment and prospects of a hefty grant award to encourage students to become family practice physicians will highlight the coming academic year at the Kansas University School of Medicine. James Price, dean of the medical school, says KUMC like about half of the medical schools in the country has been caught offering more positions to students than they expected to fill.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Dr. Charles Yockey can reel off a long list of suggestions that would help keep Kansas University students out of his office at Watkins Student Health Center. But the list basically boils down to one simple thought: Use common sense.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Summerfield Hall may look the same but plenty of changes are afoot inside, says Joseph Bauman, dean of Kansas University’s School of Business, which calls Summerfield home. A year ago, Bauman recalls, a team of faculty began picking apart each of the school’s academic programs, weighing their strengths and weaknesses and outlining suggestions for improvements. Although it’s a continuing process, Bauman said the team already is leaving its mark on the school.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
The transformation of Hoch Auditorium a campus treasure at one time more suited for basketball than for class lectures will be easier than Kansas University officials once anticipated. “We always planned to renovate Hoch, but it was going to be difficult to design because all the old iron roof beams would extend down to the lower floors,” said Allen Wiechert, KU director of facilities planning.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
The arrival this fall of two Rockefeller Foundation postdoctoral researchers marks a landmark occasion for Kansas University’s Joyce and Elizabeth Hall Center for the Humanities. The center organized and pursued the effort that resulted in KU’s new designation as a Rockefeller Residency Site, explained Janet Crow, acting director. The researchers, Leos Jelecek, a senior historical geographer with the Czechoslovak Academy of Science in Prague, and Paul Hirt, a recent graduate of the University of Arizona, will be the center’s first participants in its “Program in Nature, Culture and Technology.”
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
John Hiebert holds a human skull and dreams of what could be. His musings are full of hope; his work directed at freeing people from the burden of deformities that can devastate the human spirit.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Kansas University’s Student Body President Brad Garlinghouse says students should get involved with student government for a simple reason: It enriches their experience at KU. “You can go through four years here and just be content,” he said. “Or you can get involved and make a difference so that when you leave, you’ll leave making a difference and it will be that much more special.”
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
There’s good news and bad news for international students attending Kansas University this year. The bad news is that new federal immigration laws make it more difficult for international students to arrange employment in this country.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
The K.S. “Boots” Adams Alumni Center has been under new management for the last year, but the operating philosophy hasn’t changed. Simply stated, the center strives to provide high quality service for its clientele. Kevin Carroll left the manager’s job last July and his responsibilities were divided between Mike Wellman, manager of the alumni center facility, and Brian Greve, who manages the Learned Club at the center. “We’re always concerned about providing the services that people have come to expect,” said Wellman.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Here is where children count most. Toddlers and pre-schoolers fill classes set up as model education programs. College students learn the ways of research into early childhood development and special education. Researchers design programs that take the fruits of their work to schools across the country.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Ed Meyen takes over as executive vice chancellor of Kansas University’s Lawrence campus at a time when higher education will come under increasing scrutiny. “Everyone knows higher education is being looked at. Everyone understands higher education must change,” said Meyen, who replaced Del Shankel in July.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
When describing the recent accomplishments of Kansas University’s School of Architecture and Urban Design, Dean Max Lucas uses a word associated with sound building skills and academic programs. The word is “solid.”
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Campaign Kansas is in the record books. Kansas University’s private fund drive, which officially ended this summer, is described as historic; its impact long-term.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Kansas University’s dean of libraries knows that the university’s huge library system can seem overwhelming for new students. But it doesn’t have to be.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
There’s no magic formula. But high standards, hard work and a strong will, combined with the right amount of blowing off steam, are important ingredients for academic success at Kansas University.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Resolved: Kansas University perennially features a strong debate team. Resolved: Arguing against the above statement would be a difficult task because KU debaters:
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Kansas University’s Student Assistance Center just may have the answers to a lot of students’ academic and social questions. “We have two themes,” says the center’s director, Lorna Zimmer. “Are the students getting as much out of the university as they can, both socially and academically; and are they getting it in a comfortable way?”
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Former Kansas University instructor Paula Gottdenker designated $151,000 from her estate for scholarships to women 50 years or older. Merrill Haas of Houston pledged $125,000 to support KU’s geology field camp in Canon City, Colo.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Two pivotal events during the past acadmic year let faculty in Kansas University’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication know exactly where they stand. Dean Mike Kautsch said the school came in for reviews of its programs by both the Kansas Board of Regents and the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications.
EUDORA PANEL STARTS CAMPAIGN FOR NEW HIGH SCHOOL
August 15, 1992
A steering committee here has launched an informational campaign aimed at securing voter approval this November of a $6 million bond issue to finance construction of a new high school. Bill Winkle, assistant chairman of the committee, addressed the Eudora school board on Thursday to explain the group’s organizational structure. He said the committee comprises five subgroups voter registration, speakers bureau, information central, community relations, and ways and means.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
When Mary Kelly returns to the Baltics this fall to teach sociology at a Lithuanian university, she’ll have one eye trained on her students and the other on her family roots. A sociology doctoral candidate at Kansas University, Kelly is half Lithuanian. She already has visited the country once to explore her roots, and when she returns this fall she hopes to collect data for a dissertation on people doing the same thing.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Kansas University students who make use of the medical services on campus this fall will find some changes at Watkins Health Center. The changes aim to improve services and address students’ major complaints about the health center, says James Strobl, director of the student health center.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Kansas University alumna Mildred Clodfelter vividly recalls the day in 1941 she joined fellow students to dig up dandelions along Jayhawk Boulevard. “Our class, the Class of ‘41, was known as the dandelion class,” said Clodfelter of Lawrence. “We even had a dandelion king and queen.”
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Anyone looking to meet new friends, develop leadership qualities and become an active member of a strong social and academic organization may want to consider the Greek system at Kansas University. “If you want to be part of the sorority experience, it’s open to anyone,” said Jennifer Zucco, vice president for public relations for the KU Panhellenic Assn.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
As a Kansas University freshman, Dustin Daugherty thought it would be a waste of time to put on a cap and gown and walk down Campanile Hill at commencement. “Now that I’ve seen my friends do it, I’m really excited about being in the procession,” said Daugherty, a fifth-year senior from Russell.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Ann Eversole will be the first to tell you that there’s more to student life than slinging a backpack over the shoulder and heading to class. “I think that whole out-of-class experience can be as meaningful as the in-class experience,” said Eversole, who is director of Kansas University’s Organizations and Activities Center.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Some have become television weather forecasters one even filled in for Willard Scott. Others have found jobs with the National Weather Service, working at offices from Florida to Alaska.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
A phenomenon is flowering in Lawrence just as it does every August: Teen-agers many of them fresh out of high school come to Kansas University and instantly age three or four years. One minute they’re 18; the next they’re 22 and standing in line at a nightspot. The proof is on the identification cards they display at local bars and to Lawrence police.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
A small enrollment and an emphasis on primary care are two of the drawing cards that attract students to the Kansas University Medical Center’s Wichita campus, The small number of students enrolled at the Wichita branch of the medical school allows faculty to provide more individual attention to students’ educational needs, says Dean Joseph Meek.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Kansas University wants high-ability students who enroll at KU to reach their full potential. One way to do it is through KU’s honors program.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
“The mission of the School of Engineering is to provide its students with the highest quality education experience possible, to generate and apply knowledge through research, development, and scholarly activity, and to serve society, the state and the engineering profession.” That statement, adopted by the school of engineering this year, suits the school’s dean, Carl Locke, just fine.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Daryl Evans says no one ever told him learning wasn’t supposed to be fun. “It is supposed to be fun,” he said.
KU EDITION
August 15, 1992
Two goals of the nation’s first umbrella organization for black men are being fulfilled with the staging of a national conference on black leadership and publication of the first scholarly journal devoted to black male issues. Jacob Gordon, chief executive officer and co-founder of the National Council for African-American Men Inc., the umbrella group, said the conference, which was held this week in Atlanta, sought to create a coalition of groups devoted to improving the condition of black people in America.