Entries from blogs tagged with “ku”

Cliff’s Notes: Turner Gill press conference, 10/18/11

Here is the Cliff's Notes version of Kansas football coach Turner Gill's comments at his weekly press conference today.

If you want to get live updates from each week's press conference, be sure to follow us on Twitter (@kusports).

Full audio has been posted.

Gill says his guys played with great determination and confidence against Oklahoma. The team played with great physicality. Gill thinks the team can build on last week's game, and he expects his guys to do that.

• Gill said linebacker Steven Johnson did a great job of being a leader and bringing the team together during the week.

• KU safety Keeston Terry is questionable for Saturday's game against Kansas State. Center Jeremiah Hatch is questionable. Running back Rell Lewis is out, while RB Brandon Bourbon will be ready to play.

• Gill says the key to the game is turnovers. KU has to win that battle to improve its chances to win.

The coaches are aware that it hasn't been playing as well in the third quarter. The coaches are evaluating a lot of things and have addressed the issue. Coaches have discussed for a few hours how to improve in that area.

No one can say how many years it takes to turn around a program. Gill doesn't have that magic number. But he believes in the plan the staff has at KU. You just have to stick with your plan and keep believing in it. Bill Snyder had enough time to put his plan together at Kansas State. In general, Gill says in life, people jump to certain things and tend to want change.

• Gill says his team can't allow itself to get hurt on special teams. Against Kansas State, the team at least needs to not get beaten in that category.

Center Jeremiah Hatch is excited to go. He's a little bit sore. Gill is glad that physically, he's going to be all right after his injury against OU.

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Jayhawk fan nominates Bill Self to lead the Fed

Sometimes – well, often, really – the Internet gives us a chance to chuckle at things that are serious. In the case of the Occupy Wall Street movement, where clarity about pretty much anything is lacking, one man at an Occupy Denver rally knows what he stands for.

He is a Jayhawk.

From the good folks at Deadspin we bring you the rantings of a man who is crazy. Crazy for Kansas basketball. He even nominates Bill Self for chairman of the Federal Reserve. And how many championships has Missourah won? Anyway, it's good for a chuckle.

Update: The fan is apparently the father of a Kansas University graduate, who was moving into a new home in Denver, if this blog is to be believed. The father is a banker, the family thought it would be funny to take pictures of him in the middle of the protest.

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Cliff’s Notes: Bill Self press conference, KU men’s basketball media day

Here is the Cliff's Notes version of Kansas basketball coach Bill Self's comments from KU men's basketball media day on Thursday.

Full audio has been posted.

Self is surprised that KU was picked to win the conference. He joked that often he says that coaches are smarter than the media, but that might not be the case this year. Self goes into this year with tempered expectations, which he believes should be accurate. He thinks being picked to win the league is fine, and he won't shy away from that.

This year's team will be different. KU won't score a lot of points, even if it plays fast. The Jayhawks will have to be very good defensively this year. Self believes this team has the potential to be good on defense.

• Self believes Tyshawn Taylor and Travis Releford have the potential to be the top defensive players in the Big 12 at their respective positions.

Self thinks the Big 12 is tougher because it's round-robin. The league is going to be good. Self picked Baylor to finish first in the league and Texas A&M second in his preseason poll. If a team goes 14-4 in the conference, it will have had a great year. Self thinks 18 conference games is too many. Any coach who says differently is lying. The 18-game conference schedule makes for a harder season and limits a coach's flexibility with scheduling in non-conference.

Thomas Robinson is a good player. Self loves his attitude and energy. His "try" level is off the charts. He's never carried the water before. If he didn't play well earlier in his career, Self could put the starters back in. Robinson is going to be the first guy interviewed after every game, whether he plays well or not. That's a different pressure.

Self thinks Tyshawn Taylor is ready for the leadership role. Self thinks he's going to have a great year. Tyshawn is ultra-competitive. He had a lot of success early, then labored a little later when he had expectations. Self thinks he's matured and grown up. All indications from the coaching staff are that he's ready to lead this year. Taylor is coaching guys as opposed to telling them what to do. He's doing a lot of things that natural leaders do.

• Kevin Young has the potential to be a starter. He's a hybrid player in that he can play inside and outside. He's a little like Julian Wright in that sense. He's a high-energy guy. He's a great kid. He just has to get comfortable playing for KU.

Thomas Robinson has to get into great shape. Fouling and negatives like that come from being tired. He needs to be one of the most well-conditioned players in the league. He should play between 32 and 35 minutes.

Last year, KU didn't protect the rim very well. Self thinks Jeff Withey has the potential to lead the Big 12 in blocked shots, if he gets enough minutes. Self never took Cole Aldrich for granted because he corrected bad defense. Withey has gained some muscle in the offseason.

KU is still waiting for clarification from the NCAA to see if Ben McLemore and Jamari Traylor can play at Late Night. They can't practice right now, but Self just wants the two to be with their teammates. KU should find out Friday if those two can participate in Late Night. Self thinks their final status will be decided soon.

Self thinks Releford is a perimeter guy that might allow KU to do different things. For example, there may be times when Releford can post up on a possession to allow Robinson to play on the perimeter to draw the defense away from the basket.

Self said it'd be nice to get 20 minutes per game from Withey, because he's going to foul. A lot of his minutes will be dependent on how well he defends. In a perfect world, he's a 20-minute-per-game guy. The staff thinks he's gotten a lot better. When he's playing well, he can cause a lot of problems for the opposition.

Elijah Johnson has a chance to blow up this year. He's been impressive to the coaches so far. He was a kid, even in high school, who never quite put it all together. This could be the year for him to put it all together. KU expects a lot out of Johnson this year.

Naadir Tharpe is going to play. Self says he's going to get minutes and hopefully be very productive. Tharpe reminds Self, personality-wise and how he plays, of Aaron Miles.

Merv Lindsay played well in some AAU events to impress KU's coaches. Some ACC schools were on him as well. He's a talented kid. He can shoot. Physically, he hasn't gotten strong enough yet. He's working hard. He's gained a lot of good weight.

Kevin Young is a smart kid. He wants to please. He's like a sponge. Self wouldn't be surprised if he becomes a coach someday.

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Cliff’s Notes: Turner Gill press conference, 10/11/11

Here is the Cliff's Notes version of Kansas football coach Turner Gill's comments at his weekly press conference today.

If you want to get live updates from each week's press conference, be sure to follow us on Twitter (@kusports).

Full audio has been posted.

Gill says there are a lot of positives through five games: 1. KU is No. 1 in the Big 12 net punting; 2. KU is No. 1 is least amount of penalties; 3. KU has 9.5 yards per passing attempt and 6.1 yards per play; some of these numbers compare favorably to Oklahoma's offensive numbers. Gill has been pleased with his team's offense and special teams this year.

• Running back Brandon Bourbon and safety Keeston Terry are both questionable for the Oklahoma game.

• Playing the top team in the nation is an opportunity not many teams get, and the Jayhawks are looking forward to it.

• The switch to the 3-4 defense has had ups and downs. KU hasn't been consistent with it. Part of the reason for the switch was to get more speed on the field.

• Gill says he's been up against the odds before in his life. He was against the odds when he became starting quarterback at Nebraska. He said that 98 percent of the people wouldn't have said he was going to earn that spot.

• Gill says KU can't turn the ball over. The defense has struggled, but the offense hasn't helped with the giveaways. Turnover margin is a big equalizer. KU has to improve in that area.

Quarterback Jordan Webb has only had a couple instances in the last two weeks where he's tried to do too much. But he's still played extremely well. He's very accurate. He's improved, and he's still only a sophomore.

Before college, the last two schools Gill chose between were Oklahoma and Nebraska. He said that made his first win as a player over OU a little more special.

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Cliff’s Notes: Turner Gill press conference, 10/4/11

Here is the Cliff's Notes version of Kansas football coach Turner Gill's comments at his weekly press conference today.

If you want to get live updates from each week's press conference, be sure to follow us on Twitter (@kusports).

Full press conference audio has been posted.

Gill says his guys were upbeat Sunday. The coach believes his team is making good progress, despite not getting wins lately. He listed a few areas of improvement:

  1. In the first three games, KU had three three-and-outs. KU's defense forced three three-and-outs against Texas Tech.

  2. KU has twice the pass breakups that it had a year ago at this time.

  3. KU is averaging 9.9 yards per pass attempt. The goal is six or seven yards per attempt, so that is exceptional.

KU has no significant injuries from the last game. The coaches anticipate running back Darrian Miller will be ready to go.

Oklahoma State's 13 turnovers forced was one of the statistics that jumped out to Gill when he was looking at their totals. KU will have to have good ball security.

KU has talked about halftime adjustments as a staff. The coaches have made a few changes and will try to be a little more specific with what they want from the players. The coaches also are going to try a few different things in practice to attempt to improve the team's play in the third quarter.

Gill would like to see improvement in both kickoff returns and punt returns. Gill said punt returns have been disappointing this year. Some of that has to do with blocking at the line of scrimmage.

Gill said when the other team is in the hurry-up, it's important to simplify the defensive calls. It needs to be one word or one symbol. Substitutions also can be challenging against fast-paced offenses. One key is to stop the offense before it gets a first down, as usually a first down triggers the faster pace.

• It's tough for a defensive coordinator when you don't have a spring practice to work with your guys. The players probably aren't adjusting to Vic Shealy's system as fast as the coaches hoped they would. Gill said when that happens, you have to take a step back as a staff and try to simplify things a bit.

• Keeston Terry switched from strong safety to free safety last week against Texas Tech. With the switch, he does not have to make as many defensive calls. Gill believes that helped him think less and play better. That also gives the responsibility of making calls to the more experienced (and older) Bradley McDougald.

Gill hasn't been surprised by his running backs' production, but he has been happy with their ball security this year.

Gill isn't using the fact that KU is a huge underdog to Oklahoma State as motivation for his team. That doesn't do any good. That's emotions. It comes down to execution.

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Cliff’s Notes: Turner Gill press conference, 9/27/11

Here is the Cliff's Notes version of Kansas football coach Turner Gill's comments at his weekly press conference today.

If you want to get live updates from each week's press conference, be sure to follow us on Twitter (@kusports).

Full audio has been posted.

Cornerback Isiah Barfield is questionable for the Texas Tech game with an ankle injury. The coaches will see how he does over the next two or three days. Gill thinks he will be available.

Gill says coaches have looked at personnel and schemes this week in trying to improve the defense. There could be personnel changes, with a few different guys getting more snaps.

• Getting defensive tackle Pat Dorsey back from injury will help KU. It adds depth and gives KU an experienced player.

• The receiver rotation should be more stable going forward. Six to seven guys should play a majority of the time. Four to five will get a majority of the repetitions.

Outside linebacker Toben Opurum has played well. Gill thinks he will make more plays going forward, as teams will be throwing more. Opurum has a good motor playing off the edge.

Gill says the KU coaches are still trying to best fit their schemes defensively to their personnel. The Jayhawks are still trying to find their identity defensively.

Quarterback Jordan Webb has done a great job with his footwork this year. His feet have been in position to make a good throw. He's improved on that this season. He's matured like the coaches hoped he would.

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Perry Ellis chooses KU

4:35 p.m. update

That's going to wrap up the live coverage of the event here. Be sure to check back to KUsports.com for full press conference video after we get it all uploaded this evening. Also be sure to check out Gary's full story later on KUsports.com or in Thursday's Journal-World.

4:13 p.m. update: By Gary Bedore

Wichita Heights senior forward Perry Ellis orally committed to Kansas University at 2:45 p.m. Wednesday at the Wichita Heights High School gymnasium. Ellis, who was seated at a table next to his dad, Will, and mom, Fonda, chose KU over Kansas State, Wichita State and Kentucky.

"I knew for so long. I've been there so many times. I felt so comfortable there," Ellis said. "It made me realize that was the school for me. All the schools were so great, but I was so comfortable there."

Ellis said he was looking forward to working with KU big-man coach Danny Manning, who he's developed a relationship with.

He cited the improvement of the Morris twins as an example of Manning's coaching ability.

Ellis — the 24th-ranked player in the class of 2012, according to Rivals.com — called the coaches of the four schools immediately before the news conference.

"I'm happy it (recruiting) is over with," Ellis said. "I'm really excited."

4:05 p.m. update

Here's the short video of Perry Ellis announcing that he's going to KU. We'll have more of the press conference coming in a video later.

4 p.m. update

Quick poll question: Do you think Perry Ellis will start at KU his freshman year?

3:50 p.m. update

Have some short video of Ellis' announcement coming shortly.

3:28 p.m. update

Here are two photos from Gary Bedore. Couldn't get too close to him during the presser, or he'd have blocked all the cameras.

Wichita Heights basketball player Perry Ellis stands after announcing his decision to attend Kansas on Wednesday, Sept. 21, in Wichita.

Wichita Heights basketball player Perry Ellis stands after announcing his decision to attend Kansas on Wednesday, Sept. 21, in Wichita. by Gary Bedore

Perry Ellis, center, sits with his father, Will, and mother, Fonda, during his press conference on Wednesday at Wichita Heights High School. Ellis selected Kansas over Kansas State, Wichita State and Kentucky.

Perry Ellis, center, sits with his father, Will, and mother, Fonda, during his press conference on Wednesday at Wichita Heights High School. Ellis selected Kansas over Kansas State, Wichita State and Kentucky. by Gary Bedore

3:20 p.m. update

Working on photos/video. Should have more posted shortly.

3:07 p.m. update

Here's what Perry Ellis was looking out at, just to give you an idea of the setting.

3:02 p.m. update

There were no hats for the Ellis decision. Actually, I thought he and his family handled it well. Very little self-promotion. Came in, announced, answered questions and didn't make this a circus.

2:58 p.m. update

Press conference has ended. Ellis just walked out of the gym with his parents.

2:57 p.m. update

Ellis: "Even going up there (to KU), you could see the tradition before the games. ... It's one of the top tradition programs, I would say. I'm proud to be a part of it."

2:55 p.m. update

"It's one of the happiest days (of my life)," Ellis said.

2:53 p.m. update

Ellis said he was looking forward to working with Danny Manning. He mentioned the Morris twins as a sign of how well Manning develops players.

Ellis also said KU coach Bill Self was the first one to come to his games freshman year. "That really impressed me and humbled me," Ellis said.

2:50 p.m. update

"All these schools are real close to me. They've been there for three or four years now. It was a tough decision."

2:48 p.m. update

Ellis hugged both his parents after making the decision.

"I just felt so comfortable there (at KU)," he said.

2:47 p.m. update

After thanking God, his parents and Wichita Heights, his coach and his trainer and all the schools that recruited him, Perry Ellis picked Kansas University.

2:45 p.m. update

He's coming out right now.

2:40 p.m. update

Just been told this announcement shouldn't be delayed and will take place at 2:40 p.m.

Here's a photo of all the mics to show you the media presence here.

Senior Perry Ellis is announcing his college decision at Wichita Heights High School on Wednesday.

Senior Perry Ellis is announcing his college decision at Wichita Heights High School on Wednesday. by Jesse Newell

2:35 p.m. update

Hey guys. We're here live at Wichita Heights High School, waiting the announcement for Perry Ellis, who will choose his college destination at 2:45 p.m. His final four schools are Kansas, Kansas State, Wichita State and Kentucky.

We arrived here about a half-hour early, and already, about 10 cameras were set up. This is announcement is drawing quite a media crowd, especially because the 24th-ranked player in the class of 2012 has three local schools left on his list.

Check back for more as we get closer to the announcement.

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25 interesting stats, facts and quirks about this year’s KU football team

Here are some numbers I found interesting about this year's KU football team.

All stats come from cfbstats.com or KUathletics.com.

KU is the only team in the nation that has played three games without recording an interception or throwing one. Only nine other teams haven't recorded an interception, while 11 others haven't thrown one. Utah State and Rice also have no interceptions offensively or defensively, but both have just played two games.

Kansas quarterback Jordan Webb throws over Northern Illinois defenders Tommy Davis and Joe Windsor during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011 at Kivisto Field.

Kansas quarterback Jordan Webb throws over Northern Illinois defenders Tommy Davis and Joe Windsor during the first quarter on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011 at Kivisto Field. by Nick Krug

KU's offense is sixth in the nation in third-down conversion (57.45 percent). The two Div. I teams that KU has played this season also rank in the top eight nationally (Georgia Tech, first; Northern Illinois, eighth).

KU is eighth nationally in punting, averaging 47.8 yards per boot. Ron Doherty doesn't make the national leaders list, though, because KU has not punted enough; a punter has to average 3.6 punts per game, and Doherty has 3.3.

Even with the defensive struggles, KU has more first downs than its opponents this year (74-73).

• KU's defense has allowed the most 20-plus-yard plays (24) of any Div. I team. The Jayhawks also have allowed the most 30-plus-yard plays (14) and 60-plus-yard plays (four). The Jayhawks are tied for second nationally in 10-plus-yard plays allowed (56).

KU has allowed 13 rushing plays of 20-plus yards this season. The second-most allowed by any Div. I team is eight.

KU's 44 points per game allowed is tied for second-worst nationally. The Jayhawks' 282 rushing yards per game allowed also is the second-worst mark in the nation.

Northern Illinois running back Jasmin Hopkins takes in the Huskies' final touchdown late in the fourth quarter on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011 at Kivisto Field.

Northern Illinois running back Jasmin Hopkins takes in the Huskies' final touchdown late in the fourth quarter on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011 at Kivisto Field. by Nick Krug

KU has allowed 550 yards per game, which is second worst in the nation next to North Texas (559 yards per game). As a side note, North Texas' defensive coordinator is former KU defensive coordinator Clint Bowen.

KU has allowed 7.49 yards per rush this season. That's almost a full yard more than the second-worst run defense in Div. I (North Texas, 6.56 yards per rush).

KU's opponents are averaging just 32.4 yards per punt.

KU has allowed five sacks in three games this year (1.7 per game). Last year, the Jayhawks allowed 37 sacks in 12 games (3.08 per game).

There have been only two 90-yard runs in Div. I this season: Oregon's LaMichael James' 90-yard run against FCS school Missouri State and Georgia Tech's Orwin Smith's 95-yard run against KU.

Opponents are averaging 8.5 yards per play against KU's defense.

• KU quarterback Jordan Webb has completed 39 of 59 passes this year (66.1 percent). The school record for best completion percentage is held by Todd Reesing, who completed 66.5 percent of his passes in 2008.

Kansas lineman Trevor Marrongelli congratulates quarterback Jordan Webb (2) after the Jayhawks' 42-24 win over McNeese State on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2011 at Kivisto Field.

Kansas lineman Trevor Marrongelli congratulates quarterback Jordan Webb (2) after the Jayhawks' 42-24 win over McNeese State on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2011 at Kivisto Field. by Nick Krug

On third down and 10 or more yards to go, Webb is 4-for-5 passing for 89 yards and two TDs. All four of his completions have gone for 15-plus yards.

Running back James Sims is averaging 5.3 yards per carry on first downs (27 carries, 143 yards).

Running back Darrian Miller averages 6.0 yards per carry in the first half (23 carries) and 3.3 yards per carry in the second half (11 carries).

Kansas running back Darrian Miller scores against Georgia Tech on Saturday, Sept. 17, 2011 in Atlanta.

Kansas running back Darrian Miller scores against Georgia Tech on Saturday, Sept. 17, 2011 in Atlanta. by Richard Gwin

• Linebacker Steven Johnson is second in the Big 12 in tackles (31, 10.33 per game).

• Receiver/kick returner D.J. Beshears leads the Big 12 in all-purpose yards per game (183.7).

KU's rushing offense (235 yards per game) is second in the Big 12 behind Missouri.

KU is one of only nine teams nationally to have at least 13 trips to the red zone and score on every one of them.

The Kansas Jayhawks celebrate a touchdown by receiver D.J. Beshears during the first quarter against Northern Illinois on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011 at Kivisto Field.

The Kansas Jayhawks celebrate a touchdown by receiver D.J. Beshears during the first quarter against Northern Illinois on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011 at Kivisto Field. by Nick Krug

KU has scored touchdowns on 84.62 percent of its trips to the red zone — the fifth-highest mark nationally for teams with at least 13 red-zone trips.

• KU's offense had eight, 70-plus-yard TD drives in 2010. The Jayhawks already have nine, 70-plus-yard TD drives in three games this year.

KU does not have a punt return yet this season.

KU's defense has allowed 28 points per second half and 18.3 points per third quarter this year.

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The Sideline Report with Keeston Terry

This week's Sideline Report is with Kansas sophomore safety Keeston Terry.

Kansas safety Keeston Terry gears up for practice on Monday, April 18, 2011 at the practice fields near Memorial Stadium.

Kansas safety Keeston Terry gears up for practice on Monday, April 18, 2011 at the practice fields near Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

Jesse Newell: What’s something interesting that not many people know about you?

Keeston Terry: I don’t think most people know that I was born in Lawrence, Kan. Both of my parents were going to school here. I was actually born at Lawrence Memorial Hospital. The week before, my dad played Colorado (in football). He played, and then they came back over here for my birth.

What else? I think one thing people don’t know about me is that when I was in elementary school, I participated in this thing called, “Circus Skills.” It was just all about juggling, a lot of clown stuff. So I learned how to juggle clubs, balls, scarves, basketballs, plungers. Pretty much anything you could think of.

JN: How does that work?

KT: Our teacher was big about juggling and hand-eye coordination. So in classes, we learned how to juggle and things like that. You come here in the morning, start basic with some scarves, maybe some balls.

Some people learn how to ride unicycles. You practice, practice, and then you get better at it.

JN: So who signed you up for that? Your dad?

KT: If you were interested, you’d just go ahead and do it. I liked juggling just because it was something that worked on my hand-eye coordination and was fun. Once I got good at it, I started doing other things.

JN: What’s the most you could juggle at one time?

KT: Probably the most I could juggle was four balls, five balls. That’s not a lot to some people, but once you get into other things ... I thought it was fun to do the plungers and the bowling pins. I kind of found that more fun than just juggling regular balls.

JN: That’s got to be really hard, juggling those things.

KT: Yeah, (laughs) it was kind of difficult at first. Frustrating. But once you get it, it comes easy.

JN: Do you ever show it off?

KT: Nah, I don’t think anybody knows that, except for maybe my mom and some of my friends. But I haven’t done it in a while, so I might be a little rusty.

JN: What’s a TV show that you’re embarrassed that you watch?

KT: Teen Mom.

It’s funny. It’s just interesting to watch how people live through the teen years. But it’s probably the most embarrassing.

JN: Are there times you watch it when you think you should be doing something else?

KT: Yeah. But I’m a TV guru. I just like watching MTV shows. My roommate watches it with me: the kicker Ron Doherty. We don’t see it as a big deal.

JN: What’s something interesting about living with him?

Kansas place kicker Ron Doherty (13) Monday, April 18, 2011, during spring football practice at the practice fields next to Memorial Stadium.

Kansas place kicker Ron Doherty (13) Monday, April 18, 2011, during spring football practice at the practice fields next to Memorial Stadium. by Kevin Anderson

KT: His dance. He has this little dance he does. He doesn’t like to show most people, but it’s quite interesting to watch.

JN: Describe it to me.

KT: You ever seen a marching band? You know how they march? (pumps arms in the air) That’s kind of like what it is. It’s kind of funny.

JN: When does he use it?

KT: (laughs) He tries to make fun of the kids on the team, because a lot of them might like to dance in the locker room, just on their free time. So he just tries to make fun of them. It’s not a good imitation at all. He just kind of made up his own dance after that.

JN: What was last year like for you?

KT: It was fun. Definitely a great experience, because not a lot of people get to experience playing as a true freshman. I definitely enjoyed it. It was crazy going out and playing in front of 40-thousand-plus fans and actually having some success out there.

Media and fans swarm coach Turner Gill after the Jayhawks upset Georgia Tech.

Media and fans swarm coach Turner Gill after the Jayhawks upset Georgia Tech. by Nick Krug

JN: What was the toughest part about your season-ending injury?

KT: Really getting into the flow of things. You feel like you had an opportunity towards the middle and end of the season to start, because people were going down with injuries and people were not always playing well. So I think that was the toughest part, knowing that you had the opportunity to do bigger and better things, but you get cut short.

JN: What about the rehab? What was the toughest part of it?

KT: Trying to come back, and you’re not really ready yet. Going through things and still feeling some soreness. You’re not sure if you’re really going to feel the same when you actually come back. Things like that.

JN: Do you feel the same now?

Northern Illinois receiver Martel Moore is tackled by Kansas safety Keeston Terry during the fourth quarter on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011 at Kivisto Field.

Northern Illinois receiver Martel Moore is tackled by Kansas safety Keeston Terry during the fourth quarter on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011 at Kivisto Field. by Nick Krug

KT: I don’t think I’ll ever feel completely the same after having that knee injury, but I feel like I’m close. Will I ever get back to where I feel like I’m 100 percent? I don’t know yet. But I feel a lot better than I was previously when I was hurt.

JN: Your dad played for the Chiefs. Do you remember anything about that?

KT: Briefly. I attended a couple games with my mom. We really didn’t watch out in the stadium that often. It was more inside with the other teammates’ families. I remember him always being gone a lot, things like that, but not too much about it.

JN: Did you meet any of the players?

KT: Yeah, I met some of the players. He was really good friends with Neil Smith, David Whitmore, Tracy Simien, guys like that. They were pretty close friends with him.

JN: What’s your goal for this year?

KT: I want to get opportunities to make plays and just help out my team as much as I can to get wins. Any personal accolades come after the season. I just really want to win. Three-and-9 is tough, and getting predicted to go 1-11 ... I just want to win games. That’s most important to me.

JN: You happy at safety?

The Jayhawk secondary, clockwise from center, are Isiah Barfield, Tyler Patmon, Keeston Terry, Corrigan Powell, Bradley McDougald and Greg Brown.

The Jayhawk secondary, clockwise from center, are Isiah Barfield, Tyler Patmon, Keeston Terry, Corrigan Powell, Bradley McDougald and Greg Brown. by Nick Krug

KT: Yeah, I’m happy. I think I’m happy. I don’t know. (smiles) I really enjoy playing receiver, but I want to do whatever they need me to do to help this team be successful. That’s what I’m going to do.

JN: Is there one time it’s hardest for you to not be a receiver?

KT: The hardest time is watching people when they drop passes or do things that you think you’re capable of doing. I think that’s the hardest time, but you’ve just got to brush it off and do your job.

JN: You remember the day you decided you were coming to KU?

Kansas safety Keeston Terry takes down McNeese State tailback Javaris Murray after a reception during the second quarter on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2011 at Kivisto Field.

Kansas safety Keeston Terry takes down McNeese State tailback Javaris Murray after a reception during the second quarter on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2011 at Kivisto Field. by Nick Krug

KT: Yeah. I know I had a previous commitment to Nebraska before I decommitted. I came up here a couple times. I really enjoyed the atmosphere of being around Lawrence, Kan. It really just wore on me throughout that time.

I finally decided to tell coach (Clint) Bowen, who was recruiting me at the time, that I wanted to be a Kansas Jayhawk. I was excited and happy about my decision. I still am.

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Comings and goings here at LJWorld.com

I'm very excited today to introduce you to Alex Parker, our new digital editor here at LJWorld.com.

Alex will replace Whitney Mathews, who you'll all remember left LJWorld.com and The World Company just before July 4 this year. It's taken us a little longer than we would have liked to replace Whitney, but it was important to us to have the right fit. Alex is the right fit.

Some of you may recognize Alex's names from his previous time at the World Company. He was our education reporter — coincidentally one of his clearest memories is reporting on the USD 497 decision to build new stadiums at its high schools — and then a reporter and web producer for our websites. One of the works I'll most remember from his time here was the multimedia story he did on a Fort Riley unit's preparation to deploy to Iraq.

Alex left us in 2009 and has worked for the Chi-Town-Daily News and the Chicago Reader before returning to Lawrence just this week. I'm really excited to be putting the LJWorld.com community in his hands.

With LJWorld.com in good hands, I feel like it's an appropriate time to announce news of my own. A few weeks ago, I let The World Company know I'd be leaving to take a new role at Public Radio International in Minneapolis, Minn. My last day is next Tuesday.

I've spent the past five years working here — and I've lived here for more than eight — and I cannot tell you all how thankful I am for all of the support and wisdom I've gained from working with the community here — both virtually on LJWorld.com and our other websites as well as in person in Lawrence. Leaving will be bittersweet for me; I'm sad to leave my friends and colleagues in Lawrence, as well as the community we have here, but I'm excited for the new opportunity.

So, thanks again, for being a fantastic community. And don't be surprised if you still see me lurking in the comments occasionally. There's a great community here and I just don't want to totally get away.

--Jonathan

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Cliff’s Notes: Turner Gill press conference, 9/13/11

Here is the Cliff's Notes version of Kansas football coach Turner Gill's comments at his weekly press conference today.

If you want to get live updates from each week's press conference, be sure to follow us on Twitter (@kusports).

Full audio has been posted.

Gill said KU's fans have been tremendous in the Jayhawks' two home games. He appreciates it, and his players and coaches do, too.

• Receivers Daymond Patterson and JaCorey Shepherd are out for the Georgia Tech game. Shepherd's injury is anticipated to be short term. The bye week after the Georgia Tech game could help KU in that respect.

This past offseason, KU's coaches evaluated everything in terms of conditioning. They put together a plan to try to get the players better.

Gill says the biggest key for his team against Georgia Tech's offense is to tackle well. Last year against Georgia Tech, KU's defense tackled well and created a few turnovers.

Linebacker Tunde Bakare is probable for the Georgia Tech game. Gill anticipates that he will play. The coaches feel good about Bakare's progress this season.

• Gill believes his team will be more prepared for its first road game this year. Many players are back from last year, and the coaching staff has been here more than one year now.

Gill says it's OK to call KU's running back as QB formation "The Wildcat." It's less confusing for people that way because it's the formation's common name. He's not concerned that the name is also the mascot of one of KU's biggest rivals.

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Cliff’s Notes: Turner Gill press conference, 9/6/11

Here is the Cliff's Notes version of Kansas football coach Turner Gill's comments at his weekly press conference today.

If you want to get live updates from each week's press conference, be sure to follow us on Twitter (@kusports).

Full audio has been posted.

• Gill says KU improved its speed and passion last week. "Passion" was the word of the week.

Gill was happy with his team's ball security offensively. The offense also got off to a good start.

Gill was pleased that his defense allowed just three points in the first half. He also was happy his defense tallied three sacks and held McNeese State to under 100 yards rushing.

KU's special teams won four out of six phases against McNeese State. KU did not win kickoff or kickoff return but won the other four.

Receiver Daymond Patterson is doubtful against Northern Illinois. Receiver Christian Matthews is out for violating team rules. Quarterback Jordan Webb is just fine and will play.

Gill says the keys against Northern Illinois are: 1) to be plus-two in turnover margin; 2) have a two-to-one ratio when it comes to 20-plus-yard plays; and 3) make sure KU wins four or more phases in special teams.

"Focus" is the word of the week. KU needs to key in on the small details.

• Running back Darrian Miller talked about committing to KU early, then backed off that for short time to weigh his options. He later gave his full commitment to KU. Gill says it's nice to have K.C. area players be part of Kansas football.

Gill thought linebacker Tunde Bakare showed his explosiveness against McNeese State. He made plays that some guys can't make. Gill also thought Darius Willis was steady.

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A fan first (in New Mexico), KU walk-on Shane Smith expected to play in first collegiate game Saturday

Kansas defensive tackle Shane Smith, second from right, takes instruction with the defensive line during practice on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011.

Kansas defensive tackle Shane Smith, second from right, takes instruction with the defensive line during practice on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. by Nick Krug

Shane Smith couldn’t keep his eyes open.

It was April 1, 1991. Shane — currently a sophomore Kansas University defensive lineman — was watching the men’s basketball national championship game between Kansas and Duke with his father, Terry, at their home in New Mexico.

There are times when Terry still blames his son for the loss. If only Shane wouldn’t have fallen asleep at halftime, the Jayhawks would have beaten Duke and won the title. Understandably, Shane never takes him too seriously.

“I was 5 months old,” Shane said with a smile. “He still likes to joke about it.”

Because of his dad — who grew up in Topeka — Shane was raised as a Jayhawk fan in Albuquerque, N.M.

On Saturday, Shane is expected to play in his first game for the school he’s always followed.

Smith, who has competed on KU’s scout team the last two seasons, has moved his way up the depth chart following some injuries on the Jayhawks’ defensive line.

The 6-foot-5, 280-pound defensive tackle played with KU’s first-team defense during its scrimmage on Aug. 20.

“I just want to be able to contribute,” Shane said. “That’s my goal: to get on the field and get some playing time in a Jayhawk uniform. Get my jersey dirty.”

So far in his career, he hasn’t gotten that chance.

After red-shirting his first season, Smith dressed out for home games last year but didn’t make it in for a single snap.

“You’ve got to keep the right mind-set is what it is,” Smith said. “If you’ve got the right mind-set, you’ll show up, you’ll put in the work and you’ll get something out of it.”

Smith's best attribute is his speed. Part of that stamina comes from playing for so long in the New Mexico altitude.

“I come down here, and I can run for days,” Smith said. “I just think that quickness factor is more my strength. I’m not the biggest, strongest, but I can move around a little bit.”

KU defensive coordinator Vic Shealy has praised Smith's improvement in the offseason, saying there have been times at practice he's impressed coaches by shedding a block then popping a ball-carrier in the hole.

For now, Smith will mostly be in during assumed rushing downs, as he projects more as a run-stopper.

He wouldn’t be the first KU football player on the roster to make the jump from preferred walk-on to contributor. KU senior linebacker and team captain Steven Johnson arrived at KU in 2008 without a scholarship before earning one prior to the 2009 season.

Smith admits that he recruited himself to KU after being named an all-state offensive lineman his senior year. He sent highlight tapes in to then-KU coach Mark Mangino, who offered him a spot as a preferred walk-on.

Though Smith had scholarship offers to Div. II schools and also interest from New Mexico, he picked the Jayhawks.

“I came up here and have been living the dream ever since,” Smith said.

As a child, Shane still remembers making a 5 1/2-hour trip to Lubbock, Texas, with his mother, Susan, to watch the Jayhawks’ basketball team take on Texas Tech.

Afterwards, Susan took Shane and his sister, Kaley, down to the locker room to where the Jayhawks were signing autographs.

A picture of Shane and former KU coach Roy Williams still hangs prominently in the Smiths’ house.

It’s not the only KU photo there.

Walk in the front door, and on the right side of a photo montage are pictures of Shane in his KU football uniform.

The left side has a photo from the day Terry and Susan's child committed to KU.

That side is Kaley’s. The high school senior is committed to KU’s soccer team; she’ll be joining her brother at KU next year.

“Everything about it up here just feels right,” Shane said. “That’s why I love it.”

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Cliff’s Notes: Turner Gill press conference, 08/30/11

Here is the Cliff's Notes version of Kansas football coach Turner Gill's comments at his weekly press conference today.

If you want to get live updates from each week's press conference, be sure to follow us on Twitter (@kusports).

Full audio has been posted.

• Gill's reasons that fans should be excited about this season: 1. Team speed and explosiveness; 2. More playmakers; 3. Being more physical.

Seven to 10 true freshmen will play in KU's first game. Gill later clarified and said that as few as six true freshmen could play in the first game, but at least eight will play in the first two to three games, based on different scenarios.

• Tight end Jimmay Mundine and receiver Erick McGriff have been suspended two games because of violation of team policies. Defensive end Tyrone Sellers has been suspended one game for violation of team policies.

Defensive tackle Pat Dorsey, linebacker Jake Farley and receiver Chris Omigie will be out the first game with injuries.

Darrian Miller has stood out the most out of the true freshmen. Gill won't list the other names just in case something changes between now and Saturday.

Freshman defensive end Pat Lewandowski will be available to play on Saturday. He suffered a leg injury on Aug. 9.

Gill said he's talked to his players about what they can learn from last year's North Dakota State loss. But the coaches have also shown the players on film how they have improved and how they are different from last year.

Receiver Kale Pick is a great example of how you would want a KU football player to be. He understands the game, is a team player and wants to be the best.

Gill said linebacker Toben Opurum is talking more this season. He sees now that he can make more plays. Gill likes his demeanor.

Kicker Alex Mueller is a guy that is consistent when he strikes it and gets the kick up quickly. He's been consistent. Ron Doherty might handle longer field-goal attempts. Coaches haven't determined who will handle kickoffs yet.

• Texas A&M and Big 12 speculation hasn't affected KU's football team. The biggest thing for Gill is that he has confidence in his chancellor and athletic director. He doesn't believe any potential changes in the conference would affect KU's recruiting.

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The Sideline Report with Jeff Spikes

This week's Sideline Report is with Painesville, Ohio, native and Kansas junior left tackle Jeff Spikes.

Jesse Newell: Do you remember the moment you decided to come to KU?

Jeff Spikes: I do. Actually I was on another recruiting visit, and a prior coach, Ed Warinner called me and he said, ‘I’ve made a transition to Kansas football, and we’re in the Big 12, and we’d like for you to come.’ At that moment, I realized, ‘Big 12 football is where it’s at.’ And that right there was when I decided to come.

JN: Where were you at? What visit were you on?

JS: I’d rather not say. (laughs)

JN: Just so they don't know that they failed, right?

JS: Oh no. They did a great job. It’s just, things seemed to fit better for me here.

JN: You remember your first day on campus?

http://www2.ljworld.com/photos/2010/aug/14/194071/

JS: I do.

JN: What was it like?

JS: I came a week later. In Ohio, we graduate a couple weeks after the southern schools. But everybody had friends, and I was just the weirdo. (laughs) The big weirdo.

I always talked on the phone. I had my little Bluetooth. And I just talked and talked and talked. Because I hadn’t been this far from home and was by myself with nowhere to swim, nobody close. So my first day on campus was foreign to me. And I was foreign to everybody else. I was different.

JN: So who talked to you first? Who friended you first?

JS: Isiah Barfield and Steven Foster.

The Jayhawk secondary, clockwise from center, are Isiah Barfield, Tyler Patmon, Keeston Terry, Corrigan Powell, Bradley McDougald and Greg Brown.

The Jayhawk secondary, clockwise from center, are Isiah Barfield, Tyler Patmon, Keeston Terry, Corrigan Powell, Bradley McDougald and Greg Brown. by Nick Krug

[Ed. note — Isiah's the one in the middle. And it's a cool pic by Nick.]

It was a break, and I couldn’t go home, because it was a short break and I lived so far away. But they were getting in this little bitty, old Mitsubishi car. A two-door car. And Isiah and Steve Foster were in there, and they were like, ‘Hey, yo. You want to go get something to eat?’ And I was like, ‘I ain’t got no friends. Why not?’ Ever since then, we’ve been good friends.

JN: Where’d you go?

JS: Steak 'n Shake.

JN: How was it?

JS: It was pretty good, but I haven’t been back since.

JN: So help me picture of this. You’ve got a big guy walking around campus. Did you have the Bluetooth on the whole time?

JS: I did. I had a Bluetooth on and I had my phone in my pocket, and I always tried to stay with my phone. I’ve got a big family. We’re very close. So talking to them just made me feel comfortable, even though I was in a foreign area. So, (my teammates) were just like, ‘Who are you talking to?’ but I was on the phone.

Or they were like, ‘You’re always talking on the phone and didn’t want to talk to anybody.’ I acted weird. I don’t think I did, but to them (I did). You know, everybody from here is either from Texas, Kansas or Oklahoma, and I was the only guy from Ohio — even the only guy from the northeastern area. So I just seemed weird to them. But we got past it. They understand me now, who I am and who they are.

JN: So you felt like an outsider for a while?

JS: Pretty much. I still kind of do, but I’m cool with myself. And I’ve got my little group of friends that understand me, so I’m not worried about it.

JN: What’s something interesting about you that not many people know about?

http://www2.kusports.com/photos/2010/apr/12/190177/

JS: I’m a very family-oriented guy. I’ve got four brothers and three sisters, an aunt. Without them, I don’t think I would be anywhere. I don’t think I would be happy without one of them in my life. That’s common to know I have that big of a family, but it’s crazy how close I am to them. I expect to talk to them every day, and if I don’t talk to them for a certain amount of time, it throws me off personally.

I try to talk to them every single day. I try to talk to my mother to see how her day’s going. I talk to my godfather. I talk to my brothers and sisters. I’m not the oldest one, but they do look up to me in that sense that I’m one of the older brothers, and I’m far away.

JN: Was it tough leaving your family in Ohio?

JS: It was definitely tough. I was really close. I am still close to them. It was just tough to know that I won’t be around to see them grow up. I knew that back then, but now, I really realize it.

They’re going to prom and junior prom and going to high school, and my sister started walking when I came. It’s just things I miss like that. I had a little nephew ... he cried the first couple times I would go home, because he was like, ‘Oh my God. This is the biggest dude I’m ever going to see.’ But we got past it, and I still try to stay close.

Every time I go home, I’m in the house. I make sure I’m there, so whenever somebody’s walking around, they’re talking to me or seeing me there. I want them to see my face.

JN: What was your favorite game since you’ve been here?

JS: The Missouri game.

We were down, and the pass from Todd Reesing to Kerry Meier was the best moment of my life. It was. It was like ... I don’t know. I couldn’t even explain it. It was like, maybe, the first time you’ve seen fireworks. It’s like, ‘Wow, this is real? Does it really exist? Does something this beautiful exist?’

And when that pass happened, it was like, ‘This is what we have practiced for every single day. This is what we live for.’ It’s that feeling. That feeling was amazing.

JN: Did you get to see it? Were you on the ground?

Kansas receiver Kerry Meier flashes a smile as he runs in what proved to be the winning touchdown against Missouri late in the fourth quarter Saturday, Nov. 29, 2008 at Arrowhead Stadium.

Kansas receiver Kerry Meier flashes a smile as he runs in what proved to be the winning touchdown against Missouri late in the fourth quarter Saturday, Nov. 29, 2008 at Arrowhead Stadium. by Nick Krug

JS: I was on the field, and I was blocking somebody. As soon as I saw the pass go up, and I saw he caught it and just ran into the end zone ... all I did was stop, throw my hands in the air and was like, ‘Thank you, Jesus. Thank you.’ It was an amazing feeling.

JN: Do you tell people that was your best moment ever?

JS: Oh yeah. That was the greatest moment ever. Like, the greatest moment, the greatest feeling. I was just happy to be a part of it, to be honest.

Kansas head coach Mark Mangino laughs with his team after its 40-37 win over Missouri Saturday, Nov. 29, 2008 at Arrowhead Stadium.

Kansas head coach Mark Mangino laughs with his team after its 40-37 win over Missouri Saturday, Nov. 29, 2008 at Arrowhead Stadium. by Nick Krug

There’s a lot of younger guys now who are like, ‘I watched that game,’ and it was exciting for them, knowing they were coming to Kansas. But to know that I was there and I was a part of it, and I was on the field at that moment, is just amazing. It was a great feeling.

JN: What was your favorite TV show growing up?

JS: Cartoons. Boomerang (TV channel). I would say Boomerang. The Cartoon Channel. I’ll watch Tom and Jerry, The Jetsons, the Smurfs. Everything. Looney Tunes. I just love cartoons.

JN: You still watch them?

JS: I do. Every day. I don’t really watch too much regular TV. You don’t have to focus, but it’s entertaining to me. Not in a kiddie way, but I still enjoy watching cartoons.

JN: Do people give you crap about it? Or are you too big?

JS: They can’t really do that. Because I know, one of my best friends, he still watches Dragon Ball Z.

And that’s Anthony Davis, No. 30.

Cornerback Anthony Davis watches as receiver Christian Matthews comes away with a pass for a touchdown during the Kansas Spring Game on Saturday, April 30, 2011 at Kivisto Field.

Cornerback Anthony Davis watches as receiver Christian Matthews comes away with a pass for a touchdown during the Kansas Spring Game on Saturday, April 30, 2011 at Kivisto Field. by Nick Krug

He’s got DVDs of Dragon Ball Z. I don’t have DVDs of cartoons, but I definitely watch them. Like I said, we know each other, and we crack on each other for everything. But they’re going to have to accept that.

JN: What’s the toughest part about KU?

JS: Originally, the toughest part was just learning the game of football, and then driving to get that mentality that you’ve got to play every play for that play. And I say that in two ways, in the fact that, if you messed up the last play, you’ve got to continue to fight through the next play. You can’t worry about the last play. Then you’ve got to also realize, this play right here, you’ve got to play like your last play.

For me, overall, that’s been the biggest thing is actually just learning the game of football and trying to play every play like your last play, or have that mind-set. And also trying to forget the last play so you can get better.

JN: What is the best meal that you can cook? Are you a chef?

JS: My family’s pretty much the chef. But I can cook. I can do a little bit of something. I’ve been learning to cook an omelet. I cook a mean omelet right now.

JN: An omelet?

JS: An omelet. I whip it up and put the meats in it and the cheese. I’m not a vegetable-eater, but I’ll put some green onions in there. Ham, turkey, bacon ... whatever I have. I really like spicy foods, so Polish sausage, things like that. Crack three eggs, cheese. Just whip it up.

JN: Did you have to tell the coaches about your Achilles injury in the offseason last year?

JS: Yeah. Whew, it was stressful. I don’t even know how to explain it. It’s like you broke your mother’s last China plate, and it was passed down from generation to generation. That’s how I felt. I was like, ‘I don’t know if I should tell them I was doing this or I told them I was doing that or I should tell them I’ll be OK.’ I didn’t know what to tell them. I just had to break the news, like, ‘I messed it up.’

JN: What are you most looking forward to this year?

JS: I’m looking forward to just playing the game. Like that feeling when we come out, we warm up, and the crowd is getting in the stadium. Then as we go in the locker room, we get our motivation. We look at each other in the eyes, like, ‘We’re about to bleed today. We’re about to grind today. We’re about to win today.’ Then we come back out, and the crowd is just ready to see us.

http://www2.kusports.com/photos/2009/oct/24/180014/

I’m looking forward to that moment, because it’s a goosebump feeling. Like Jake Sharp told me, after he left, he always came back to every game the season after he left. He was like, ‘I miss it so much, just playing in front of this many people and getting that feeling when you come out. It’s something you can’t find doing a 9-to-5. You can’t find it really doing any other aspect of your life, because this is what it is now.

I want to live that up as much as I can, because I know eventually, there will be a time that I won’t get that feeling. I’m just trying to learn to soak it in, because this is all we got. Twelve games, and trying to go for 13.

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Cliff’s Notes: Turner Gill at KU football media days, 8/9/11

Here is the Cliff's Notes version of Kansas football coach Turner Gill's comments at KU football media days today.

If you want to get live updates from each week's press conference, be sure to follow us on Twitter (@kusports).

Full audio has been posted.

Gill likes the speed he's seen on offense. He also likes the body language of his quarterbacks. That tells him that they have confidence.

Gill has seen more speed and physicality on defense.

There's been a better approach with the football team this year. The coach gives a lot of credit to the seniors, who have been leaders. KU only has 15 seniors, including walk-ons.

• On defense, Steven Johnson has stood out. He's running well from sideline to sideline. Bradley McDougald has stood out as well after five practices. He's been around the ball and has tackled well.

On offense, Tanner Hawkinson has stood out. He's a leader on the offensive line. D.J. Beshears has been good as well. He's moved more to the receiver position this year. He has good hands and is very fast.

Cornerback Dominic Foreman, originally from Coffeyville Community College, has been added to the roster to take D.J. Marshall's spot.

Coaches will have a better feel after Saturday's scrimmage of who might play as a true freshmen. Gill guesses that eight or nine true freshmen will play this year.

• James Sims is KU's best running back at this point in time.

Coaches and players have been a lot more relaxed in Year Two. A lot of coaches last year were waiting to see how Gill would respond to certain situations. Gill feels a lot less tension in the room.

• Gill says there's a definite gap between KU's top two quarterbacks (Jordan Webb and Quinn Mecham) and its next two quarterbacks (freshmen Mike Cummings and Brock Berglund).

• Gill repeated his stance on Brock Berglund, saying he is still a part of the football team. "When he's around, he's around," Gill said. Gill is going to let the court system play out.

(Note: I did see Berglund walk by today, so he's here now.)

Darrian Miller is right in the thick of the running back race. The coaching staff still needs to see if he will be able to take the hits, bounce back and get up for the next play. He has big-play potential.

Gill says he understands his football team a whole lot better. He also understands KU and the fans a lot better.

After five days of practice, Gill would say that KU is a better offensive team than defensive team. It depends on the day, though. Part of that, too, is because new defensive coordinator Vic Shealy is still working on implementing some of his defensive schemes.

The coaches anticipate that freshman defensive lineman Pat Lewandowski will be available for the first game following his injury.

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Congratulations to Meghan Kinley, 100 Degree Contest winner!

It's hot. There's no denying it.

In fact, according to the AP, Kansas was home to the hottest place in the country on Sunday.

No, it wasn't Lawrence.

But we did top 100 degrees for the first time all year, and that means it's time to announce the winner of our Ron King Agency Guess the First 100-Degree Day contest.

As it turns out, according to the National Weather Service, the arbiter of all things temperature and precipitation, we officially hit 100 in Lawrence at 4:15 p.m. (We topped out at 101 at 6 p.m., they said).

So, that means it's time to announce our winner. We had hundreds and hundreds of entries and out of all of them, our winner was just 45 minutes off.

Meghan Kinley of Lawrence guessed we would hit 100 degrees at 3:30 on July 10. Well, it was 4:15, but that's close enough to win the prize.

So, congratulations Meghan! Meghan claimed a prize package that included:

• Four tickets to a T-Bones game • Over-the-shoulder bag cooler • Giant beach towel • 16-inch flying disk toy • Toy sand shovel and molds • Neutrogena spray-on sunscreen • Roll-up picnic blanket tote • EZ-Freeze water bottles • Fruit Burst drink syrup

Special thanks to Ron King Agency for being the presenting sponsor for our contest, and also to the Kansas City T-Bones for the baseball tickets.

Also, if you'd like to get severe weather information via cell phone or email, sign up for our severe weather alerts.

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‘Coach’ breaks down KU’s wide receiver screens, gives out grades

After talking with new/old Kansas receivers coach David Beaty in the spring, I could tell one area that he especially wants to stress is blocking.

Kansas University wide receivers coach David Beaty, right, delivers instructions to KU wideout D.J. Beshears on April 18 at the KU practice field. Beaty rejoined the Jayhawks’ staff after serving as offensive coordinator at Rice last season.

Kansas University wide receivers coach David Beaty, right, delivers instructions to KU wideout D.J. Beshears on April 18 at the KU practice field. Beaty rejoined the Jayhawks’ staff after serving as offensive coordinator at Rice last season. by Kevin Anderson

In Beaty's two previous seasons with KU in 2008 and 2009, much of the Jayhawks' success offensively came because of well-executed wide receiver screens.

For this blog, I wanted to get a little more into wide receiver blocking, an area many of us overlook while watching the games because we tend to follow the football.

I once again have consulted a Div. II offensive assistant coach, someone we'll just call "Coach" in this blog.

After going through film, I pulled out each of the Jayhawks' wide receiver screens from last year's Colorado and Missouri games and also this year's spring game.

I then had Coach grade each play.

With his receivers, Coach reviews film of every play, giving a grade of either 0, 1 or 2.

Here's a look at how Coach would have graded each of KU's receivers on the following seven plays. Use the video clip above each breakdown to follow along with Coach's assessment.

Coach's words: "No. 83, the receiver on the outside (Chris Omigie), he doesn’t initially take a very good angle to make sure and cut off the cornerback. You see how he lets the cornerback get inside of him right there? He’s really pretty lucky that that cornerback didn’t really get a big hit on his slot receiver right there.

"Now obviously, this slot receiver (Daymond Patterson) doesn’t do a good job of catching this ball on the first try. But really, that wide receiver, No. 83 up there, needs to step inside first to protect against the inside from this corner right here. Then, if the corner does come back outside, then he can get back and return to his original aiming point. Footwork first."

Grades: "I’d probably give them both zeroes, No. 83 (Omigie) for his technique, and then the slot receiver (Patterson) for a drop."

Coach's words: "This is an outside receiver screen right here. The two inside receivers (Tim Biere and Patterson) both do a pretty good job of keeping two of the defenders away from their outside receiver right here. They both go to cut, and neither one of them actually gets their guy down on the ground, but they do an OK job at occupying them long enough to give their other receiver time enough to make a good catch and get a first down here.

"If you’re going to go cut a guy, you definitely want to get them down on the ground. Some keys to a cut block are making sure you don’t try to cut too early. You need to have very little space between you and the defender.

"And a lot of times, you’ll see guys making mistakes in cutting. They try and cut down around the shins or down around the ankles when really their aiming point when they go to cut should be at the thigh level. And (they need to) run through their cut, not just dive at them and dive straight down into the ground — really run through when you go to cut. Now eventually, you will dive and end up on the ground, but you really want to have a lot of momentum going so that you can take their legs out from under them."

Grades: "I would grade all those guys ones right there. There was nothing spectacular that really went on, but they all pretty much got the job done and they ended up getting a first down out of the play."

Coach's words: "No. 86 (Biere), he’s the one on the line. He initially doesn’t do a great job right there. Notice how he kind of takes too wide of a step with his first step and allows that defender to go directly inside of him right there? That could have caused a big problem for KU if that defensive back would have looked up and saw the ball. He could have had an easy interception and return for touchdown right there. He almost overruns the play.

"He needs to be a little more patient and let the guy come to him so he can keep him covered up right there. Now, he does come back and gets a nice knockdown on the play when No. 17 reverses his field. That’s good.

"The No. 3 receiver, the slot receiver (Kale Pick), when he goes to cut this guy, he doesn’t really run through it. He kind of just dives down at the guy’s ankles.

"See, he needs to continue to run his feet and run through his cut right there and really try to work to get the guy down on the ground. Now, he does occupy the guy long enough, so if the ball would have been caught, he would have technically had the guy blocked. He kind of just stuffs his face right down into the ground."

Grades: "The outside receiver (Chris Omigie) is going to get a zero for a drop. I’d probably end up giving (Biere) a one on that play, just because he comes back and makes a nice play and gets a knockdown. I’d probably give (Pick) a one. If the outside receiver makes the catch there, he probably would have had long enough to run by that corner."

Coach's words: "81 (Johnathan Wilson) probably just could have ran through his hit a little bit harder. See how when he goes to hit him on the 20-yard line how his feet get stuck in the mud right there? He could have really ran his feet and shot his hands through the guy’s chest and really just continued to run his feet, instead of having his feet and hands kind of go dead right there. See how he kind of gives him the chicken wing instead of putting his hands right into his breastplate and really running his feet?"

Grades: "(Colorado's) No. 3 doesn’t make the tackle, and 81 (Johnathan Wilson) does a good enough job to allow 15 (Daymond Patterson) to get upfield a little ways, so I’d give him a one right there.

"I would have given 15 (Patterson) a one right there. Probably would have given him a two if he would have ended up getting by ... see how he makes No. 19 miss originally and then No. 19 comes back in and makes the tackle? If he would have been able to get away from him and get 5 or 10 more yards, I probably would have given him a two for a great move, but that’s pretty much a one.

"I expect most of my guys to be able to make that move right there. He didn’t stand much of a chance, obviously, because there were two or three defenders out there. That was an overall productive play right there, though, by the receivers."

Coach's words: "Really good job by 81 (Johnathan Wilson). See how No. 81 has a nice aiming point and basically has his nose on the corner’s outside number? And really, No. 15 should continue to chase the numbers, see, because 81 has the corner blocked.

"81 has a nice aiming point. He’s using his hands well.

"If No. 15 continues to chase the bottom of the numbers to the outside here, they’re probably going to have a lot bigger play than what they ended up having, because he cut back into trouble.

"You teach your guys on bubble screens like this to chase the numbers and really continue to work outside, because all the defense is coming from the inside. And he cuts right back into trouble here. Trust your outside receiver to continue to work this guy up the field and go outside and try to get some big yards here."

Grades: "81 could do a little better job. See how he’s giving a bunch of ground right here?

"He could really drop his butt and try to drive this corner back more and give 15 a better angle to run, but he really does a good enough job right here. I’d give both receivers a one."

Coach's words: "The No. 2 receiver, 43 (Ted McNulty), does a good job. He gets his hands on the defensive back. He could have his butt down a little more and drive his feet a little bit harder.

"Again, with the No. 3 receiver (Pick), he could do a better job with his cut. See how he dives at the defender’s ankles right there? He could really do a better job, take two more steps upfield, and make sure that he’s trying to cut the guy at thigh level instead of just trying to cut his ankles right there."

Grades: "I’d probably give (Pick) a zero right there. I’d probably give the slot receiver (McNulty) a one. I’d give the outside receiver (Omigie) a one. Overall, pretty productive by the No. 1 and No. 2 receivers right there."

"I believe it’s No. 46 right here (Jimmay Mundine), his guy makes the play.

"The No. 1 receiver (Erick McGriff*), I think he’s doing an OK job here. I think he realizes that the defense is playing man-to-man, and he’s just going to run the corner off, which is totally fine as long as the corner continues to run with him. See how the corner turns a man turn to him?

"A man turn is turning toward the receiver. Zone turn would be turning to the inside of the field. The cornerback doesn’t take a zone turn; he takes a man turn to that receiver. And the receiver just runs him off.

"If you can tell the guy’s going to play man-to-man by reading the coverage and reading the defense, then yeah, just go ahead and run the guy off."

* — It's hard to tell which receiver this is from the film, though it looks to me like it's McGriff.

Grades: "That’s a good job by the No. 1 (McGriff). I’d just give him a one right there.

"(Mundine), zero. His man makes the play. The No. 2 receiver (Connor Embree), I’m going to give him a one, because he really didn’t stand a chance because his No. 3 receiver didn’t get it done for him right there."

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San Diego State sources fire back at KU, Kevin Young

Kevin Young is still making headlines in San Diego.

Kevin Young watches the alumni scrimmage during the Bill Self basketball game on Wednesday at Horejsi Center.

Kevin Young watches the alumni scrimmage during the Bill Self basketball game on Wednesday at Horejsi Center. by Richard Gwin

The 6-foot-8 forward, who originally signed a grant-in aid with San Diego State eight months ago, reconsidered and committed to Kansas University on Friday.

Evidently, people close to SDSU are still fuming.

On Tuesday, the San Diego Union-Tribune posted another story about Young, this time disputing KU coach Bill Self's assertion that Young decommitted from SDSU before taking a campus visit to KU.

The story is definitely interesting. Here's part of what the Union-Tribune's Mark Zeigler wrote:

Two sources close to the situation, speaking on the condition on anonymity, say it went like this:

The SDSU coaches got wind about Young’s trip to Kansas the week before and phoned him to confront him about it. And even then, the sources said, Young never formally decommitted from SDSU before taking the trip — wanting to keep his options open.

Zeigler also makes mention of Young’s AAU coach, Elvert “Kool-Aid” Perry, saying he "is believed to have been influential in the decision behind the switch."

Don't think we'll ever know exactly what happened with Young's recruitment, but so far, that hasn't stopped both schools from trying to convince others that their version of the story is correct.

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In case you missed it … Morris twins, KU football player videos sweeping Internet

If you're a KU fan, you'll probably want to check out these videos featuring Jayhawk athletes that first appeared online Wednesday.

The first video is of Marcus and Markieff Morris on ESPN's Sport Science set. The brothers have their basketball skills broken down scientifically and also have their skills compared to some current NBA players. Definitely worth a look.

The next video from KU Athletics, featuring football players Daymond Patterson and A.J. Steward challenging the KU soccer team to a shootout, evidently is so good that it's going to be featured on ESPN's SportsCenter.

I'm not going to ruin the surprise, but let's just say, you'll want to watch until the very end.

DP & AJ TAKE ON KU - WOMENS SOCCER from Kansas Jayhawks on Vimeo.

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